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post #81 of 87 Old 10-02-2008
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We don't have a day tank in our application. We have a low pressure pump plumbed in to the main fuel supply line after the Racor filter. It's convenient. I don't worry about how to manually transfer fuel from one container to another. I still spill milk at the dinner table when filling my glass so a day tank for diesel wouldn't work for me.

SteveCox's suggestion sounds interesting too, depending on how often you run your motor.

Ray
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1983 Fraser 41
La Conner, WA


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Boating for over 25 years, some of them successfully.
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post #82 of 87 Old 10-02-2008
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Originally Posted by Hartley18 View Post
Aside from the risk of water getting in (assuming the reason you're using the heater is that it's wet and cold), I'd think re-filling the day tank from the comfort of a warm and cozy cabin would be much more pleasant.
We're talking the Pardeys...their ideas about convenience aren't necessarily the same as yours and mine. I view their DVDs as part "great ideas!" and part cautionary tale.
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post #83 of 87 Old 10-02-2008 Thread Starter
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I might have as many stoves in my garage as Mainsail has anchors in his by the time Im through with this...
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post #84 of 87 Old 10-02-2008
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Quote:
Originally Posted by SteveCox View Post
I have seen some diesel day tanks plumbed to the return from the engine to the tank. The return line goes from the engine to the tank and when it is full there is a return line to the main fuel tank that way the day tank is filled every time you run the engine. It seemed pretty convenient to me.

Installing it this way will mean you don't have to bleed this system. This is the preferred way to install an oil heater in a home.

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post #85 of 87 Old 10-02-2008
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Originally Posted by Freesail99 View Post
Installing it this way will mean you don't have to bleed this system. This is the preferred way to install an oil heater in a home.
I'd worry about doing this on a boat though.. it means you have pressurised fuel lines (not much pressure, but still some) running within the cabin.

Any sort of leak is not only the mess it would be at home - in the confined space of a yacht it could empty your fuel tank (leaving you stranded someplace) and be a lethal fire risk if mixed with the wrong sort of automatic electric bilge pump..

Cameron

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post #86 of 87 Old 10-02-2008
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Originally Posted by JohnRPollard View Post
Unless you spilled!

Therein was the only real downside to bulkhead/cabin mounted diesel/kero heaters from our perspective: Potential odor from unburned or spilled fuel.
Kero wouldn't be too bad - after all, that's what they use for dry-cleaning.

Diesel would be problem though.. particularly on nice new cushions!

Cameron

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post #87 of 87 Old 10-02-2008
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Quote:
I'd worry about doing this on a boat though.. it means you have pressurised fuel lines (not much pressure, but still some) running within the cabin.

Any sort of leak is not only the mess it would be at home - in the confined space of a yacht it could empty your fuel tank (leaving you stranded someplace) and be a lethal fire risk if mixed with the wrong sort of automatic electric bilge pump..

To be honest with you I don't think it is really pressurised at all. I can't recall ever even hearing a hiss or the fuel spraying in any way if I had to remove a line from the system and broke a seal. All it is, is a loop. You'll get more spill and smells without it.

S/V Scheherazade
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