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Go Back   SailNet Community > On Board > Gear & Maintenance
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  #11  
Old 10-07-2008
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I agree..

Quote:
Originally Posted by artbyjody View Post
I find boatlife very watery. Anytime I squeeze it out of the tube more watery substance than actual substance (caulk). It also takes a long time to cure. It is effected alot by heat as well. I used it to treat wet repairs (leaks as they happened) and was not to happy about the outcome. Just my anti - life caulk rant, I prefer the 3m products.
I agree 3M 101 is a better & thicker polysulfide and it handles UV better. As dog said DO NOT use polysulfide on plastics unless you know for certain it's compatible!
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Last edited by Maine Sail; 10-07-2008 at 09:57 PM.
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  #12  
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It sounds like you are using boatlife liquid caulk....the one to use is the regular



Not this


Quote:
Originally Posted by artbyjody View Post
I find boatlife very watery. Anytime I squeeze it out of the tube more watery substance than actual substance (caulk). It also takes a long time to cure. It is effected alot by heat as well. I used it to treat wet repairs (leaks as they happened) and was not to happy about the outcome. Just my anti - life caulk rant, I prefer the 3m products.
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Boatlife will not "ATTACK" plastic. It may discolor it slightly after a long time.

Quote:
Originally Posted by sailingdog View Post
Just be aware that you shouldn't use POLYSULFIDE sealants with plastics, as they're generally not compatible. POLYSULFIDE sealants will attack most plastics. BoatLife LifeCaulk is a polysulfide sealant.
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  #14  
Old 10-07-2008
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GBurton-

I am curious why you think it is okay to use Polysulfide sealants with plastics when even BoatLife says that LifeCalk shouldn't be used with plastics...
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  #15  
Old 10-07-2008
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i am really liking the idea of butyl. What say ye Mainesail?
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Depends on what you're bedding... if you're bedding chainplates, butyl might be a good one to go with...not too sticky, not too strong, but stays soft and seals very, very well. It's also good for genoa rails and fixed ports.
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You know what the first rule of sailing is? ...Love. You can learn all the math in the 'verse, but you take
a boat to the sea you don't love, she'll shake you off just as sure as the turning of the worlds. Love keeps
her going when she oughta fall down, tells you she's hurting 'fore she keens. Makes her a home.

—Cpt. Mal Reynolds, Serenity (edited)

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  #17  
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I have used LifeCaulk on plastic boats for over 20 years with great results. It is a bedding compound (i.e. a sealant) not an adhesive. I use it where there is a mechanical method of holding something in place and the interest is in sealing the junction to avoid leakage. The Lifecaulk flows well when first applied and stays flexible (so it doesn't crack) for many years. A prime example would be bedding a lifeline stantion. For bedding applications good adhesion can be a disadvantage since one assumption is that the attachment is not permanent.
Lifecaulk does not "attack" plastic, it just doesn't adhere well to it in all cases, and it can discolor some transparent plastics.
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My boat...

Quote:
Originally Posted by jackytdunaway View Post
i am really liking the idea of butyl. What say ye Mainesail?
My boat was built at the factory using butyl. It's the only boat I've never owned where almost 85% of the fittings are still original and have not needed re-bedding. Even the hull to deck joint is butyl as well as the aluminum toe rails. The boat does not leak one drop..

Here's a 30 year old genoa cleat that I removed look at the elasticity!

And the 30 year old BONE DRY core..


These days I use butyl for just about everything..

P.S. GBurton has a "red square" for reputation for a reason.

Talk to the folks at Beckson, the port light company, and they will tell you EXACTLY what Dog said. Polysulfides will ATTACK and make many plastics brittle. It does a LOT more than just turn it yellow!!

Oh, and the venerable Don Casey apparently knos less than Mr. Gburton too:

Don Casey Article on Sealants (LINK)


Here's a direct quote from Don Casey on polysulfides and plastics:

"However, the solvents in polysulfide sealant attack some plastics, causing them to harden and split. Specifically, you must not use polysulfide to bed plastic windshields or plastic portlights--either acrylic (Plexiglas) or polycarbonate (Lexan). Don't use it to bed plastic deck fittings either, including plastic portlight frames. Plastic marine fittings are typically ABS or PVC, and polysulfide will attack both."
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Last edited by Maine Sail; 10-07-2008 at 10:32 PM.
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  #19  
Old 10-07-2008
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On deck, you can build a small dam out of modeling clay or beeswax (sold cheaply as toilet bowl ring seals) so the water will not run into your work area, then just arrange something over that so rain can't fall directly in it. An alcohol wash (isopropanol) should remove any surface moisture from the working surfaces.
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Quote:
Originally Posted by gc1111 View Post
Lifecaulk does not "attack" plastic, it just doesn't adhere well to it in all cases, and it can discolor some transparent plastics.
Please try to be more careful in what you say or type as some might actually believe what you say and ruin an expensive part. Please check your "facts" before you post them!

Overview of Life-Calk Caulk Sealant - White, 2.8 OZ.

From the WM Site

"Versitile adhesive sealant
One-part, thiokol-based polysulfide sealant cures to a positive waterproof seal. Resists oil, brine, gas, water and most chemicals. Bonds to wood, fiberglass, metal and glass. No priming required except on oily woods such as teak.
  • Formulation: One-part polysulfide caulking/sealant
  • Recommended Usage: Fiberglass, wood, metal, glass; above and below water
  • Material Incompatibilities: Not recommended; glass to vinyl, ABS/Lexan, plastic hardware to fiberglass/wood
  • Adhesion Rating: Tensile: 80 psi; ultimate elongation 200%
  • Cure Time: Tack free: 24 hrs; complete cure: 10 to 20 days
  • Cleanup: Life-Calk Solvent, Model 139592
  • Removal: Mechanical remova"
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