A painting question.... - SailNet Community

   Search Sailnet:

 forums  store  


Quick Menu
Forums           
Articles          
Galleries        
Boat Reviews  
Classifieds     
Search SailNet 
Boat Search (new)

Shop the
SailNet Store
Anchor Locker
Boatbuilding & Repair
Charts
Clothing
Electrical
Electronics
Engine
Hatches and Portlights
Interior And Galley
Maintenance
Marine Electronics
Navigation
Other Items
Plumbing and Pumps
Rigging
Safety
Sailing Hardware
Trailer & Watersports
Clearance Items

Advertise Here






Go Back   SailNet Community > General Interest Forums > Gear & Maintenance
 Not a Member? 
  #1  
Old 10-12-2008
Perithead's Avatar
Montgomery 17
 
Join Date: Nov 2007
Location: S/E Alabama
Posts: 384
Thanks: 0
Thanked 1 Time in 1 Post
Rep Power: 7
Perithead is on a distinguished road
A painting question....

I am at my girlfriends house browsing the web looking at different sailboat refit blogs and such. I just found 2 that contradicted each other when it came to painting the hull.

One of them just cleaned and lightly sanded the hull and the other sanded the heck out of it. I mean sanded down to nearly the fiberglass. It took him a very long time to sand the whole boat. He also sanded under the waterline very extensively.

So, do you really HAVE TO sand it very thoroughly or will just getting it smooth and roughing up the surface do well enough?

Tell me what you guys think and if you ahve tried it both ways or know of someone who has.
__________________
Small is beautiful, simple, cheap, and easy......

To view links or images in signatures your post count must be 10 or greater. You currently have 0 posts.

Sailing Videos, Woodworking Videos and More!
Reply With Quote Share with Facebook
  #2  
Old 10-12-2008
NOLAsailing's Avatar
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Sep 2006
Location: Mandeville, LA
Posts: 504
Thanks: 0
Thanked 0 Times in 0 Posts
Rep Power: 8
NOLAsailing is on a distinguished road
It depends on what the existing coating is and how well it's adhered. If it's a compatible paint and in good shape, a fairly light sanding is all that's necessary. If not, then it all has to come off.
__________________
-Jason

To view links or images in signatures your post count must be 10 or greater. You currently have 0 posts.
Reply With Quote Share with Facebook
  #3  
Old 10-12-2008
Perithead's Avatar
Montgomery 17
 
Join Date: Nov 2007
Location: S/E Alabama
Posts: 384
Thanks: 0
Thanked 1 Time in 1 Post
Rep Power: 7
Perithead is on a distinguished road
Ok interesting. Now this may be a difficult one to answer. How can you tell what the existing coat is and how well it's adhered.

I know I ask ALOT of questions but that is how I am learning and I appreciate it.
__________________
Small is beautiful, simple, cheap, and easy......

To view links or images in signatures your post count must be 10 or greater. You currently have 0 posts.

Sailing Videos, Woodworking Videos and More!
Reply With Quote Share with Facebook
  #4  
Old 10-12-2008
artbyjody's Avatar
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Jan 2008
Location: Bellingham, PNW
Posts: 3,146
Thanks: 0
Thanked 0 Times in 0 Posts
Rep Power: 10
artbyjody is just really nice artbyjody is just really nice artbyjody is just really nice artbyjody is just really nice
Are you strictly talking above the waterline?

Most sand the heck out of fiberglas and gelcoat when they get blisters and it is below the waterline. Then they fill and fair and prime and paint.

Above the waterline sanding enough to not remove the gelcoat but remove the oxidation and scratches and prep the surface for primer / eopxy. I painted my C-27, it was a light sand on the hull to apply the primer then paint (all above waterline). You really do not want or should go to the fiberglass if you have a gel coat present (above waterline).
__________________
-- Jody

S/V "
To view links or images in signatures your post count must be 10 or greater. You currently have 0 posts.
" -
1983, Barberis Show 38! or
To view links or images in signatures your post count must be 10 or greater. You currently have 0 posts.



To view links or images in signatures your post count must be 10 or greater. You currently have 0 posts.







Reply With Quote Share with Facebook
  #5  
Old 10-12-2008
Faster's Avatar
Just another Moderator
 
Join Date: Sep 2005
Location: New Westminster, BC
Posts: 14,390
Thanks: 63
Thanked 160 Times in 157 Posts
Rep Power: 10
Faster has a spectacular aura about Faster has a spectacular aura about Faster has a spectacular aura about
If it's original gelcoat then simply sanding lightly and filling any nicks is all you need prior to applying the primer. If the boat is already painted, then you have the hassle of determining, as Jason said above, how well it's on there, and as/more importantly will there be a compatability problem with the coating you're planning to use. This can require doing a small test area and let it sit to see if the new paint attacks the old.

If the boat is faded and chalky looking chances are it is original gelcoat, but that's not a guarantee. The safest course of action, esp on a larger boat or when you're using expensive paint, is to get right down to the original glass/gelcoat and start over from there.

Chemical removers will leave less work behind as far as filling and fairing goes - it's difficult to uniformly sand all the paint off and leave a fair surface.
__________________
Ron

1984 Fast/Nicholson 345 "FastForward"

".. there is much you could do at sea with common sense.. and very little you could do without it.."
Capt G E Ericson (from "The Cruel Sea" by Nicholas Monsarrat)
Reply With Quote Share with Facebook
  #6  
Old 10-12-2008
Perithead's Avatar
Montgomery 17
 
Join Date: Nov 2007
Location: S/E Alabama
Posts: 384
Thanks: 0
Thanked 1 Time in 1 Post
Rep Power: 7
Perithead is on a distinguished road
Thanks jody, well I didnt clearify if I was talking about above or below the waterline. I wasnt specifically talking about one.

Here I will give my two instances one above and one below the water line.

Above: The old paint is there and I think there is still some gellcoat on it but not much(although Im not very qualified to judge). I am thinking I can just sand those parts then prime and paint. But, there are numerous chips in the paint also. They go through the layer of paint and that is all. I think I just need to figure out how to fill them. So, what is best to fill them with?

The bottom: This is a trailerable boat and the bottom is in excellent condition as far as blisters go. I think just a decent sanding will do for the bottom.

What do you guys think about my mediocre plan?
__________________
Small is beautiful, simple, cheap, and easy......

To view links or images in signatures your post count must be 10 or greater. You currently have 0 posts.

Sailing Videos, Woodworking Videos and More!
Reply With Quote Share with Facebook
  #7  
Old 10-12-2008
artbyjody's Avatar
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Jan 2008
Location: Bellingham, PNW
Posts: 3,146
Thanks: 0
Thanked 0 Times in 0 Posts
Rep Power: 10
artbyjody is just really nice artbyjody is just really nice artbyjody is just really nice artbyjody is just really nice
Keep it simple. You can fill using the primer and adding a bit of silica to it to make it a paste - and fill in the spots that have the gouges and sand it after it dries. One doesn't haven't have to go extremes with it with expoxy / bondo fillers. You'll want to have at least two coats of primer and if you mix a ratio of 1/3 of the epoxy paint to primer - when doing the primer phase, it will reduce the number of coats to get a good solid color when aspplying the topcoats. I learned the hard way and for the red I painted my C-27 , it took nearly 6 coats to get a uniform glossy color.
__________________
-- Jody

S/V "
To view links or images in signatures your post count must be 10 or greater. You currently have 0 posts.
" -
1983, Barberis Show 38! or
To view links or images in signatures your post count must be 10 or greater. You currently have 0 posts.



To view links or images in signatures your post count must be 10 or greater. You currently have 0 posts.







Reply With Quote Share with Facebook
  #8  
Old 10-13-2008
Perithead's Avatar
Montgomery 17
 
Join Date: Nov 2007
Location: S/E Alabama
Posts: 384
Thanks: 0
Thanked 1 Time in 1 Post
Rep Power: 7
Perithead is on a distinguished road
So, not only do I need primer and the final color paint but I also need some epoxy paint?

Im new to painting but I am learning.

Im guessing primer is just that, primer, nothign to get it confused with correct?
Then epoxy paint, does it come in color or is it just that, epoxy paint?
Then the final coats, what kind of paint would that be?
__________________
Small is beautiful, simple, cheap, and easy......

To view links or images in signatures your post count must be 10 or greater. You currently have 0 posts.

Sailing Videos, Woodworking Videos and More!
Reply With Quote Share with Facebook
  #9  
Old 10-13-2008
tommays's Avatar
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Sep 2008
Posts: 4,041
Thanks: 1
Thanked 13 Times in 13 Posts
Rep Power: 6
tommays will become famous soon enough
Anything that is going to hold up in dirrect sun will be a two part paint SYSTEM i dont know if epxoy is the correct word BUT they all have part A part B and a thinner


The agressive nature of the solvents in the paint requires useing the correct primer or it will LIFT and ruin the job


Even doing the final coat of paint can cause problems if you dont follow the recoating times
__________________
1970 Cal 29 Sea Fever

To view links or images in signatures your post count must be 10 or greater. You currently have 0 posts.

1981 J24 Tangent 2930
Tommays
Northport NY


If a dirty bottom slows you down what do you think it does to your boat
To view links or images in signatures your post count must be 10 or greater. You currently have 0 posts.
Reply With Quote Share with Facebook
  #10  
Old 10-13-2008
US27inKS's Avatar
Midwest Puddle Pirate
 
Join Date: Feb 2005
Location: Gardner, KS
Posts: 2,160
Thanks: 0
Thanked 0 Times in 0 Posts
Rep Power: 11
US27inKS has a spectacular aura about US27inKS has a spectacular aura about
The steps you take to do the paint job depend on what color you paint it, and how picky you are about the look when you're done. If you are painting a dark color, you need to be very particular about the prep work. If you're painting white, you can get away with a few imperfections.

The prep work that you do for the topsides (above the waterline, but not the deck) is different from the prep work that you'll do for the bottom. If you're sure that that topsides have been painted before, you need to either remove it all, or properly identify the paint. Some of the less expensive paints will go over just about anything, but epoxy paint (and epoxy primer) will eat cheaper paint. I recommend epoxy paint such as Interlux perfection. I used it on my boat, and after 2 years of hitting the dock (I rarely use fenders) and getting hit once while racing, I don't have a single scratch.

Once you have either identified the old paint or decided to remove it, you need to pick out your paint. Once you know what kind of paint you're using and what color, you know how much prep work is ahead.

You need to fill any deep scratches or gouges, and may have to grind out any cracks. For filler, I used epoxy with phonelic microballoons for filler. I found that this mix will sand about like gelcoat and doesn't shrink later.

Then comes the primer. Always use the primer that matches the paint. If you use enamel primer, then put epoxy paint over it, plan on stripping the boat and starting over. The primer will act as a filler for minor imperfections. When I say minor, I mean really minor. Don't expect primer to fill deep scratches. After you prime, you have to sand. When I got done sanding each coat, the boat had a bit of a shine to it. Kind of like a lightly oxidized gelcoat. I primed and sanded 4 times until I couldn't find the imperfections that I knew were there.

Now paint. Since I painted a dark color, it took 5 coats of paint before I was happy. I followed the instructions on the paint can, except the last 2 coats I thinned slightly more than recommended to get it to flow out a little better. It also made it really easy to run, so be careful if you do this. Between coats I wet sanded with 600 grit paper.

In all it was a huge amount of work, but I think it turned out well. BTW as soon as I saw this pic, I jumped in and scrubbed the bottom.
__________________

To view links or images in signatures your post count must be 10 or greater. You currently have 0 posts.
John USYacht 27 "Cora Lee"
Reply With Quote Share with Facebook
Reply


Currently Active Users Viewing This Thread: 1 (0 members and 1 guests)
 
Thread Tools

 
Posting Rules
You may post new threads
You may post replies
You may post attachments
You may edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is On


Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
Painting question wcjkinston Gear & Maintenance 10 08-01-2008 02:04 PM
Painting deck - Primer question Finallybuyingaboat Gear & Maintenance 21 10-31-2007 09:04 PM
Question about Deck Painting Procedure for 2 part paint??? 66luders Gear & Maintenance 13 08-24-2007 08:12 AM


All times are GMT -4. The time now is 08:57 AM.

Add to My Yahoo!         
Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.7
Copyright ©2000 - 2014, vBulletin Solutions, Inc.
SEO by vBSEO 3.6.1
(c) Marine.com LLC 2000-2012