Re-bedding jib car track - SailNet Community
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post #1 of 13 Old 10-14-2008 Thread Starter
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Re-bedding jib car track

I'm re-bedding the Jib car tracks on my Yankee 30. I'm going to fill and re-drill the bolt holes in the deck. I'm thinking of drilling oversize holes and filling with thickened epoxy. The hardware covers the holes, so I'm not concerned about maintaining the gel coat on the deck. The "bent nail" trick has never worked very well for me. I'm never confident about how much core I've removed, or that I'm bonding to solid, dry core. In addition, I've got a lot of holes to fill. If I wet the hole with epoxy, then fill it with thickened epoxy, I'll need to buy a case of syringes! Any reason oversize holes with a beveled
recess on the deck won't work as well?
Secondly, the track sits on a quarter inch (thick) by five eights inch (wide) strip of teak to allow space for the bottom of the cars. The back of the track is mounted in a fairly tight radius. The track is a straight piece of stainless, and I couldn't believe what tension it was under when I removed it! The old teak strip broke when I removed it, will the new teak strip comply with the radius, or will I need to use a trick such as steaming, etc. (I haven't worked with teak much).
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post #2 of 13 Old 10-14-2008
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Quote:
Originally Posted by L124C View Post
I'm re-bedding the Jib car tracks on my Yankee 30. I'm going to fill and re-drill the bolt holes in the deck. I'm thinking of drilling oversize holes and filling with thickened epoxy. The hardware covers the holes, so I'm not concerned about maintaining the gel coat on the deck. The "bent nail" trick has never worked very well for me. I'm never confident about how much core I've removed, or that I'm bonding to solid, dry core. In addition, I've got a lot of holes to fill. If I wet the hole with epoxy, then fill it with thickened epoxy, I'll need to buy a case of syringes! Any reason oversize holes with a beveled
recess on the deck won't work as well?
IF you're going to drill the holes oversized to fill them with epoxy, I would recommend using a forstner bit, since it will leave the bottom laminate fairly intact if used properly. You don't need to use a new syringe for every hole, since the syringes are reusable once the epoxy has dried. The only reason the bent nail approach is preferable is that it tends to leave both sides of fiberglass laminate fairly intact, and that is probably a bit stronger than using just an epoxy "plug". That said, you can also use a router to "core" out the fastener holes, and I'd recommend that over using the massively oversized drill bit, since it will probably yield a stronger fix.

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Secondly, the track sits on a quarter inch (thick) by five eights inch (wide) strip of teak to allow space for the bottom of the cars. The back of the track is mounted in a fairly tight radius. The track is a straight piece of stainless, and I couldn't believe what tension it was under when I removed it! The old teak strip broke when I removed it, will the new teak strip comply with the radius, or will I need to use a trick such as steaming, etc. (I haven't worked with teak much).
Ideally, you'd steam the new piece to match the curvature...but if you're bolting down the track over it... you might be able to get away without doing that... especially since the piece of teak in question is only 1/4" thick. Make sure to use a good bedding sealant and countersink the fastener holes.

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post #3 of 13 Old 10-15-2008
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I agree with Dog..

I have seen failures of "through drilled" epoxy plugs.

End grain Balsa is meant to be adhered to on the end grain NOT the longitudinal grains you hit by over drilling. It offers very little strength when you've removed either the top and bottom skin or just the top.

Try using a Dremel to carve out the Balsa from between the cores! It works much better than a bent nail.. I also duct tape my shop vac to the underside of the deck so it self clears the debris..

Here is a photo of a 100% over drill that failed. Notice the fracture line in the plug closest to you.. Again try to leave the skins as intact as possible!!

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post #4 of 13 Old 10-15-2008
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Bent nails have not worked well for me, I use allen wrenches instead. They are much stronger and last longer. Using the short end as the router, I cut it to the length that I want to remove, sometimes using a two step process with two allens of different lengths. Getting it started is the hardest part, that's where the very short "router" helps. It's difficult to start with an allen that is much longer than the diameter of the hole so start with an allen cut to 1/4" if the hole is 1/4", then you can go up to 1/2" if that is what you want to take out. Once you get the hang of it it's pretty easy. We tape off the bottom hole and vacuum from the top using a very skinny funnel end duct taped onto the vacuum hose.

good luck, John

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post #5 of 13 Old 10-15-2008
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I've had some success with these new roto cutters (drywall trimmers -sort of "mini routers".) Torquey little buggers and can be hard to control at times, but for larger holes you can mount a rabbiting bit and use the shank on the hole edge as a guide. It can take a couple of passes depending on the width of the bit vs the thickness of the core. This idea requires a hole large enough for the bit to pass through in the first place, though.

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post #6 of 13 Old 10-18-2008 Thread Starter
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Dremel works well

I have an update on this project. First of all, thanks for all the suggestions. I thought I had a balsa core in this section of deck, but it must be concrete! It laughs at bent nails and Allen wrenches! Guess it can't be too soft! The good news is, I found a "high speed cutter" (Dremel #199) in my Dremel to be very effective. I drilled the oversize hole with a 3/8" forstner bit wich allowed me to keep the bottom skin intact. I then hogged out the core with the Dremel and a shop vac. I found that if I used the shop vac with the Dremel, I could watch the dust and control how high or low I went (not to mention, control the mess). When I saw white dust (firberglass), I would stop. The Dremel bit would get hot and smoke a little, but I was able to do about 30 holes per bit. The result was uniform holes in the core, a 1/4" larger than the hole in the deck (1/2" overall"), with minimal impact on the upper and lower skins.

Last edited by L124C; 03-04-2010 at 12:38 AM.
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post #7 of 13 Old 10-18-2008
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Forstner bit?

How did yo center the Forstner bit, to get it started over an existing hole, without wandering??

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post #8 of 13 Old 10-18-2008
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MS-

It is pretty easy to do... just get a piece of wood that has a hole the size of the forstner bit in question in it... clamp it so the hole is centered over the existing hole...and use it as a drill guide for the forstner bit. Did that earlier this year to replace drain plugs on a Javelin.

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Quote:
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MS-

It is pretty easy to do... just get a piece of wood that has a hole the size of the forstner bit in question in it... clamp it so the hole is centered over the existing hole...and use it as a drill guide for the forstner bit. Did that earlier this year to replace drain plugs on a Javelin.
I've made bungs before because it's hard to clamp to a deck. I was more wondering how the OP went about it..

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Bungs would work too, if you have the proper size plug cutter. I didn't have a 1" plug cutter.

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You know what the first rule of sailing is? ...Love. You can learn all the math in the 'verse, but you take
a boat to the sea you don't love, she'll shake you off just as sure as the turning of the worlds. Love keeps
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—Cpt. Mal Reynolds, Serenity (edited)

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