Sailing in the winter in Long Island Sound - SailNet Community
Reply
 
LinkBack Thread Tools
post #1 of Old 10-18-2008 Thread Starter
Senior Member
 
davidpm's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2007
Location: Madison
Posts: 3,893
Thanks: 218
Thanked 58 Times in 50 Posts
Rep Power: 8
 
Sailing in the winter in Long Island Sound

We have always just hauled the boat for the winter but the yard is offering wet storage cheaper than dry storage now.
We have had such mild winters the last couple of years. Last December for example we had several days in the 40's.
Assuming the harbors don't freeze what is involved in extending the season?

The head can be winterized and just not used.
The fresh water system can be winterized and not used.

I live about 20 minutes from the slip.
How cold does it have to get for how long before I have to worry?
Would a elect heater in the engine compartment be enough?
Maybe I could just get good enough at running anti-freeze though the engine every time I used it.
If I was willing to spend the 5 bucks every trip how would I go about it?

In other words until it just got too miserable so it wasn't fun anymore what can work and how do you do it?
And is anyone else a winter sailer around these parts?

I asked about this last year: Winter Sailing

but never did anything about it as we had hull problems last year. Any new advice.

Last edited by davidpm; 10-18-2008 at 09:47 PM.
davidpm is offline  
Quote Quick Reply Share with Facebook
Sponsored Links
Advertisement
 
post #2 of Old 10-18-2008
Senior Member
 
paulk's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2000
Location: CT/ Long Island Sound
Posts: 2,602
Thanks: 4
Thanked 26 Times in 25 Posts
Rep Power: 15
 
We went out sailiing today. Beautiful, sunny, 17-knot breeze - it was delightful. Until we needed to head into the wind, which was blowing from the North and was at about 50. The water was warmer than the air was, so the spray wasn't too bad. In December, however, the water will not be so nice to have spraying over you. Wearing ski clothes or drysuits might make it more comfortable, but sailing in winter is also more dangerous.
There are no other boats around help if you should need it. The water is cold! If you or one of your crew falls in - and your heavier clothing is going to make you clumsier - hypothermia begins in seconds, rather than minutes. Systems like your fuel pump, that worked happily in the warm summer months might decide that cold, thick diesel fuel was too much for it to put up with any more. Ditto batteries. It would be a shame to go out for a sail and not be able to re-start the engine to get back in before the sun set and it started to get even colder.
Some people do keep their boats in their slips and do go out on nice days during the winter. They tend to be quite careful, and plan thoroughly for any contingency. Your post is a good indication of the careful approach that should be taken to the subject.
paulk is offline  
Quote Quick Reply Share with Facebook
post #3 of Old 10-19-2008 Thread Starter
Senior Member
 
davidpm's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2007
Location: Madison
Posts: 3,893
Thanks: 218
Thanked 58 Times in 50 Posts
Rep Power: 8
 
Quote:
Originally Posted by paulk View Post
The water is cold! If you or one of your crew falls in - and your heavier clothing is going to make you clumsier - hypothermia begins in seconds, rather than minutes. Systems like your fuel pump, that worked happily in the warm summer months might decide that cold, thick diesel fuel was too much for it to put up with any more. Ditto batteries. It would be a shame to go out for a sail and not be able to re-start the engine to get back in before the sun set and it started to get even colder.
Some people do keep their boats in their slips and do go out on nice days during the winter. They tend to be quite careful, and plan thoroughly for any contingency. Your post is a good indication of the careful approach that should be taken to the subject.
Exactly, I thought of those things too.
I have to triple check but I've heard that SeaTow operates during the winter but may have to launch their boat which can take an extra hour or more.
davidpm is offline  
Quote Quick Reply Share with Facebook
post #4 of Old 10-21-2008 Thread Starter
Senior Member
 
davidpm's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2007
Location: Madison
Posts: 3,893
Thanks: 218
Thanked 58 Times in 50 Posts
Rep Power: 8
 
The way I understand it all you have to do is:
Shut off the through hull.
Remove the hose and put the end in a bucket of antifreeze.
Run engine until antifreeze comes out back of boat.
Put hose back on through hull.
The engine is now re-winterized assuming you changed the oil and freshwater anti-freeze at the beginning of the winter season.

If the hose is too short I suspect I can rig an extension hose with a barb fitting that will fit and can be clamped down?
The bucked can be on the cabin sole as the engine can suck up the liquid. IE it doesn't have to be squirted up?
Is this going to kill my impeller. It will be dry for a couple of seconds more than if seawater is being forced up the hose.

Last edited by davidpm; 10-21-2008 at 12:05 AM.
davidpm is offline  
Quote Quick Reply Share with Facebook
post #5 of Old 10-21-2008
Senior Member
 
tommays's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2008
Posts: 4,295
Thanks: 1
Thanked 30 Times in 30 Posts
Rep Power: 7
 
Running antifreeze overboard even low-tox is just not right and if you read the MSDS it is a haz-mat spill

STEPS TO BE TAKEN IN CASE MATERIAL IS SPILLED OR RELEASED: This liquid is biodegradable but large spills may contaminate public waters. Prevent flow to sewers/public waters. Restrict clean up water use. Notify water supply environment authorities. Impound/recover large land spills. Soak up small spills with absorbent material. Use suitable disposal containers. High biodegradability can stimulate algae growth. Dispose residue to reduce possible aquatic harm.
WASTE DISPOSAL METHOD: Consult with local sewer, municipal, state and/or federal agencies to determine appropriate current disposal option


And that is from no-tox


Most winter sailing is done in small boats with DRYSUITS and anything orginized will have a crash boat on hand

The big issue is what the winter will do to and uncovered boat ,water gets into all kind of places and freezes and cracks ,cockpit drains get ice dams and fillup ect

1970 Cal 29 Sea Fever

To view links or images in signatures your post count must be 10 or greater. You currently have 0 posts.

1981 J24 Tangent 2930
Tommays
Northport NY


If a dirty bottom slows you down what do you think it does to your boat
To view links or images in signatures your post count must be 10 or greater. You currently have 0 posts.
tommays is offline  
Quote Quick Reply Share with Facebook
post #6 of Old 10-21-2008
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Jul 2001
Posts: 272
Thanks: 0
Thanked 0 Times in 0 Posts
Rep Power: 14
 
Where are you?

I'm lazy, so I didn't do any research to see where you are, but I have been sailing in the winter on the Potomac River for the last three years. I only day sail, so nothing is used but the engine, and that is winterized as you described by running non tox antifreeze through it. You should install a y valve near the raw water sea ****, and when you are finished sailing you simply flip the valve, put the free end of hose in the bucket of anti freeze, and run the engine for a few seconds. Very simple, and extends the season.
drynoc is offline  
Quote Quick Reply Share with Facebook
post #7 of Old 10-21-2008
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Nov 2002
Location: New York
Posts: 5,826
Thanks: 0
Thanked 18 Times in 17 Posts
Rep Power: 15
     
David, I keep my Boat north of New York city and the Hudson river. I used to keep my boat in over the winter. I did find out however, you will do little sailing in January and February. Something about the wind chill factor. I started debating with myself If it was worth the extra wear and tear on the sails and rigging to keep the boat in the water. My decision was to haul late and launch early and I found a marina 15 miles north of me who does accommodates that.
bubb2 is offline  
Quote Quick Reply Share with Facebook
post #8 of Old 10-21-2008
Senior Member
 
jimmalkin's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2004
Location: MVY
Posts: 232
Thanks: 0
Thanked 0 Times in 0 Posts
Rep Power: 11
 
I'm with Bubb - haul in Dec and splash in March. Those crystal clear, breezy winter days of Dec-March, although tempting, are bitterly cold with the temps and the windchill. And once the sails are up and you're flying along on a nice beam reach, there's nothing to do but stand or sit; despite all the fiber and layering, you'll be awfully cold and numb after a while. And - as mentioned - if you fall in, you're dead.


To view links or images in signatures your post count must be 10 or greater. You currently have 0 posts.

White Rabbit
Vineyard Haven
jimmalkin is offline  
Quote Quick Reply Share with Facebook
post #9 of Old 10-21-2008 Thread Starter
Senior Member
 
davidpm's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2007
Location: Madison
Posts: 3,893
Thanks: 218
Thanked 58 Times in 50 Posts
Rep Power: 8
 
Quote:
Originally Posted by jimmalkin View Post
And - as mentioned - if you fall in, you're dead.

Point well taken. But at least you might have 15 minutes:
What you need to know about Hypothermia
davidpm is offline  
Quote Quick Reply Share with Facebook
post #10 of Old 10-21-2008
Senior Member
 
tommays's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2008
Posts: 4,295
Thanks: 1
Thanked 30 Times in 30 Posts
Rep Power: 7
 
You might have 15 minutes but your hands will be useless in 2 minutes

1970 Cal 29 Sea Fever

To view links or images in signatures your post count must be 10 or greater. You currently have 0 posts.

1981 J24 Tangent 2930
Tommays
Northport NY


If a dirty bottom slows you down what do you think it does to your boat
To view links or images in signatures your post count must be 10 or greater. You currently have 0 posts.
tommays is offline  
Quote Quick Reply Share with Facebook
Reply

Quick Reply
Message:
Options

Register Now



In order to be able to post messages on the SailNet Community forums, you must first register.
Please enter your desired user name, your email address and other required details in the form below.
Please note: After entering 3 characters a list of Usernames already in use will appear and the list will disappear once a valid Username is entered.


User Name:
Password
Please enter a password for your user account. Note that passwords are case-sensitive.

Password:


Confirm Password:
Email Address
Please enter a valid email address for yourself.

Email Address:
OR

Log-in









Human Verification

In order to verify that you are a human and not a spam bot, please enter the answer into the following box below based on the instructions contained in the graphic.




Currently Active Users Viewing This Thread: 1 (0 members and 1 guests)
 
Thread Tools
Show Printable Version Show Printable Version
Email this Page Email this Page



Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
Long Island Sailing School Offers Fractional Sailing - PR Web (press release) NewsReader News Feeds 0 04-16-2007 04:15 AM
Cruising Multihull Sail Trim Kevin Jeffrey Buying a Boat Articles 0 10-05-2004 08:00 PM
The Joy of Night Sailing Sue & Larry Seamanship Articles 0 05-31-1999 08:00 PM
Are the Kids on a Sabbatical? Micca Hutchins Learning to Sail Articles 0 04-04-1999 08:00 PM

Posting Rules  
You may post new threads
You may post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is On
Trackbacks are On
Pingbacks are On
Refbacks are On

 
For the best viewing experience please update your browser to Google Chrome