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Go Back   SailNet Community > General Interest Forums > Gear & Maintenance
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  #1  
Old 10-20-2008
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Project boat progress

I am getting to the end of my 3-th sailing/boat owning/fixing season.
3 summers ago I've found an dirty, full of rainwater, mold and slime
Puma 23 at the end of boatyard. The owner (actually, his wife) wa willing to give it away for free. The accumulated storage payment (do not even know for how long...) and any other expenses where the bad news.
The survey was performed by the friend of mine, more experienced sailor and boatowner. His opinion was "if it keeps the water in, it will keep the water out, plus, there is a set of sails stored inside". The next good news was, the boat yard obviously, needed the spot wor a paying customers, and were open to negiotiations when I offered to get the boat out. And after more that fair sum for the coat of bottom paint, they were happy to drop it into water for me. The 9.9 Yamaha outboard and VHF I've got from the owner's wife for a very reasonal money again. After I've put the battery and rigged some wires to get the nav lights working, my first own boat was ready for the seas!
(The boatyard was really in a hurry to get rid of me, they called me to tell that the boat is ready at the dock and I have to come and get it, so I had to plan a night delivery from Long Island to NJ.)
Lucky for me, the delivery went smoothly, 5 am ride trough the hells gate and by Manhattan was unforgettable experience.


So after 3 years, to summarize the experience
- thick coats of old bottom paint sanded off, barrier coat at the bottom, topside painted, deck still waiting
- new portlights frameless smoked lexan
- new bulkheads lightcoloured plywood, not teak, give the boat more modern "Euro" style (more appropriate I think for the design)
- new dropboard same colour
- halyards run to the cockpit
- new lexan front hatch with solar vent
And some stuff I've learned:
- Minwax varnish from Homedepot is not good enough for exposed marine environment
- barrell bolt installation of portlights in not the pritiest from inside - rough fiberglass is too exposed
and, the most important,

all the projects take the valuable time from sailing!!!

Now while getting ready for winter storage, I am making the to do list based of wisdom gained so far.
Riggging:
- halyards run back worked only so-so. lazyjacks, reefing and possibly, some downhaul lines plus the friction at the masthead needs to be fixed, now I have to pull the mainsail down, almost impossible to singlehand in a stronger wind
- outboard bracket shoud be lowered more, now even in a light waves not moving at all, when not moving means not steering. Hit the bridge twice, rt 35 last year, GSP yesterday (Morgan Marina is a really F*%*&d place to keep a boat especially for novice, but the learning curve is very fast).
- working the hank on sail in a breeze with no bowrail is uncomfortable even for a reasonably fit person

and many more.
Once I have her on hard, will plan for the winter and for the next season!
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Old 10-20-2008
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Sounds like a plan. Not sure how long the outboard is but probably better to look at either a longer one or a stand for the outboard rather than structural work on the boat. And yes, Minwax is not much good for anything... Sometimes you can find 'spar varnish' some places which should be better since it is made for that and shouldn't be too expensive.
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Old 10-20-2008
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Quote:
Originally Posted by vadimgo View Post
I am getting to the end of my 3-th sailing/boat owning/fixing season......
You realize none of this counts without pictures to back it up!!
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Vadimgo,

Hey, PUMA 23 is a way cool boat, I had one as my first boat some 35 years ago. It is a good example of a boat worth any level of repair and investment because it such a great design...I look back with great fondness on what a wonderful learning experience mine provided...when you're ready to move up, look around for a PUMA 26 which has all the nice qualities of the 23 but wrapped in a much prettier package, topsides with perhaps the most tumblehome in town. Enjoy and enjoy, that is one sweet boat...but what happened to the bow pulpit, mine came with railings front and back and lifelines all around?
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All I have is the stern. No lifelines, no bow. There are mounting boltheads glassed at the places for stanchions. Apparently they where screwed onto them, which makes it easyer if you have the stanchions with the inside tread same size. Have no idea how I could find a replacement. The lifelines are not a priority right know, but the bowpulpit would make it a bit more safer.
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Old 10-21-2008
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Here we are, first days at new home
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Old 10-21-2008
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Here in addition to the Brooklyn Bridge, you could see the "plastic improvisations" by PO on the top. Now I have light wood in place, thinking about stainless instead

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Old 10-21-2008
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Originally Posted by vadimgo View Post
All I have is the stern. No lifelines, no bow. There are mounting boltheads glassed at the places for stanchions. Apparently they where screwed onto them, which makes it easyer if you have the stanchions with the inside tread same size. Have no idea how I could find a replacement. The lifelines are not a priority right know, but the bowpulpit would make it a bit more safer.
The stanchions were SS tubes withthreaded bottoms, the bolt secured them from the underside. they were not very sturdy, I broke one fairly easily, but fixed it just as easily. You should have a local fabricator make a bow rail, or you might measure the rails for other higher-volume boats andf see if you can get a close fit. They the fabricator can just bend to fit...
Your pictures bring a big smile to my face, I loved how the 23 sailed, very stiff for a small boat...
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"all the projects take the valuable time from sailing!!!"


You ain't just whistling dixie.

Keep in mind that you can eat from tin cans, sleep on the cabin sole and drink warm beer, but what makes it a sailboat is the rig.

I haven't lived aboard my boat for years, I spend weekends occasionally but that's been about it for years now. Most of my sailing is single handing a little daysail in the bay or maybe a few miles out into the Gulf periodically. I've sailed more miles doing deliveries in the past decade than I've sailed on my own boat.

My refrigeration is shot, my cushions are nonexistent save for the v berth and I have to confess, my brightwork looks like crap down below.
But the rigging is sound, the engine is reliable, I have two manual and one electric bilge pumps and lots and lots of ground tackle. I don't have insurance and never will until the State forces me to.
I have an epirb that I bought in '92, (like that'll work), and a 100 dollar hand held GPS.
The boat is doing what I need it to do right now. When I am ready to go cruising again, then I'll invest in all the other stuff. Because if I buy it all now, It's just going to sit there doing nothing most of the time and then the first time I want to use it, it won't work.
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Old 10-29-2008
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Plumbing and water tank issues

The sink and faucet you can see are going to garbage. Already have replacement sink and footpump and new faucet. The problem is water tank. It looks like the original configuration was with watertank under the Vbert.




I do not like it, afraid it would affect trim. I used an old booth strip as a reference when I put the new outboard bracket this spring. Now she floats really high. At first, when she was dropped in the water, it looked good with me sitting right at the stern. However, when a friend of mine walked to the bow to take off the dockline, outboard jumped out of the water (since I am 5’3 and would like to loose some weight rather than gain, this would be a concern every time there is anything or anybody at the bow). I intend to lower the outboard anyway, but …

Does anybody have an educated opinion about this issue???
Any comments/suggestions please!
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