What kind of anchor snubber? - Page 2 - SailNet Community
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post #11 of 52 Old 12-15-2008
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One other thing I put three feet of vinyl hose on mine for chafe. I use 1" hose on my 5/8 snubber. To prevent the hose from running I use a hot spike to put a hole in it and thread a small line through the hole. When you're all set tie the line to the snubber and it won't run.

Rick I
Toronto in summer, Bahamas in winter.

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post #12 of 52 Old 12-15-2008
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Quote:
Originally Posted by ANCORALATINA View Post
First beware of « Wichard chain hooks » as their breaking strength is quite low.
Joăo,

True. The chain grip I use is rated at only 1000# working load. When heavy weather is imminent I shackle directly to the chain. If you have a more effective solution I would be pleased to hear it.

sail fast, dave
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post #13 of 52 Old 12-15-2008
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SVA-

The best chain snubber hook I've seen is a flat stainless steel plate that is about 4" x 6" x 1/2" with two holes in it and a short slot cut into it. The slot slips around the chain, the two holes are for shackles that are attached to a snubbing bridle.

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—Cpt. Mal Reynolds, Serenity (edited)

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post #14 of 52 Old 12-15-2008 Thread Starter
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Hmmmm....I can't say I'm really much less confused, but at least I have some good ideas. It seems like there are a lot of different schools of thought.

Here's a dumb question: how does a chain hook work? It seems like it would/could fall out unless tension is maintained on the chain.
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post #15 of 52 Old 12-15-2008
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soul...tension IS maintained by hauling on the snubbers till there is significant slack on the chain between the hook and the boat. But the fact that the hook CAN fall off (usually in totally benign conditions...never when there is a load on) is a good reason to use a chain stopper on deck as well to prevent strain on the windlass.

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post #16 of 52 Old 12-16-2008
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BTW, the chain stopper, if you have one, should have a damn big backing plate on it.

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You know what the first rule of sailing is? ...Love. You can learn all the math in the 'verse, but you take
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her going when she oughta fall down, tells you she's hurting 'fore she keens. Makes her a home.

—Cpt. Mal Reynolds, Serenity (edited)

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post #17 of 52 Old 12-16-2008
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We religiously use snubber lines while anchoring on chain rodes. However, my primary purpose is to reduce the amount of wear and tear on deck hardware, as well as to dampen chain noise belowdecks, rather than to try and rectify any real or perceived shortcomings of inelastic anchor rodes with regard to overall holding power of the anchor.

Fortunately, protecting deck hardware from inelastic shockloading by chain rodes only requires a modest amount of elasticity. Just think of the clear difference between dropping a ceramic plate on a wood floor instead of a concrete floor. The wood floor must only have moved a few thousands of an inch...

Although it may be tempting to go to longer, stronger and more elastic snubber lines -- as evident from the discussions in this thread -- we should try to avoid creating what is know as a "kinetic rope" (more precisely a kinetic energy recovery rope - KERR) in the world of offroad wheeling and caterpillaring.

The purpose of a KERR, typically made of the same elastic nylon rope used for snubber lines, is to transfer kinetic energy delivered by the towing vehicle while the rope stretches, into potential energy that is going to be ADDED to the energy that the towing vehicle can deliver as soon as the rope is fully stretched.

There are some You tube videos, I believe, that show the awesome power of the KERR technique, e.g. when extracting battle tanks from the mud. The forces created should be intimidating to anyone who realizes that KERR ropes have at times pulled vehicles from the mud while leaving their wheels and axles behind. Also, a second belay line needs to be used in case the KERR line, or one of its hooks/shackles or attachment points break, since the resulting whiplash has at times catapulted hooks or shackles straight through radiators or even imbedded them in engine blocks.....

Perhaps you might argue that circumstances at anchor are very different. But, are they really.....? Some of us have probably experienced being trapped in an anchorage with substantial waves rolling in, or even breaking around us, with the bow of our vessel being driven back with great force. I submit, that under such wave-generated impact conditions (or even impacts generated by sailing wildly at anchor), the boundaries between KERR snatching and anchor snubbing are likely to be vague at best and nonexistent at worse.

If so, what practical consequences are there to be distilled for sailors?
IMHO:
(1) the elasticity of a snubber line (or an elastic anchor rode itself) is at best a two-edged sword; under certain conditions the destructive forces on anchor and deckware are likely to be amplified instead of reduced;
(2) therefore the minimum amount of elasticity necessary to control shockloading on deckware is likely to be the optimum choice; and
(3) under dynamic load conditions snubber lines should be treated with the same respect off-road recovery specialists treat their KERRs (i.e. one should keep one's distance and the rope should be replaced regularly).

Have fun!

Flying Dutchman
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post #18 of 52 Old 12-16-2008
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Quote:
Originally Posted by SVAuspicious View Post
If you have a more effective solution I would be pleased to hear it.
S/V Auspicious
I've been using this very simple hook, during YEARS of full time living aboard



This is the type described by Sailingdog, it NEVER have fall of.

Note the small hole at the corner opposite to the slot, you can attach there a small line and remotely remove the hook (with the chain under tension)

Happy anchoring

Joăo

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post #19 of 52 Old 12-16-2008
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Here's what happens when your snubber is too short. Took this picture of a Gulfstar anchored behind me a couple of years ago. Snubber snapped. His jib sheets are a bit slack too. Chain hook's hanging in good though.


Rick I
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Last edited by Vasco; 12-16-2008 at 07:59 AM.
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post #20 of 52 Old 12-16-2008
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vasco-

His snubber didn't snap, more likely it was chafed through by the CQR anchor sitting on the bow roller...
Quote:
Originally Posted by Vasco View Post
Here's what happens when your snubber is too short. Took this picture of a Gulfstar anchored behind me a couple of years ago. Snubber snapped. His jib sheets are a bit slack too. Chain hook's hanging in good though.


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You know what the first rule of sailing is? ...Love. You can learn all the math in the 'verse, but you take
a boat to the sea you don't love, she'll shake you off just as sure as the turning of the worlds. Love keeps
her going when she oughta fall down, tells you she's hurting 'fore she keens. Makes her a home.

—Cpt. Mal Reynolds, Serenity (edited)

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