Got a picture of a storm srysail mounted on separate mast track? - Page 2 - SailNet Community

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Go Back   SailNet Community > General Interest Forums > Gear & Maintenance
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  #11  
Old 12-21-2008
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I'm not sure where the clew was sheeted from the pix. Is that a track outside the cockpit?
On my boat I'd have to take the bimini off.

So why don't you sheet to the boom?
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There's an article on sailnet on them here:

Sailing Under the Storm Trysail
as to how they are set the quote is:
"For the clew, either a ring or a strop is used to attach two sheets, port and starboard, which are in turn led aft through snatch blocks on the rail to winches for trimming. Because the angle from the mast to these sheet turning blocks is fairly broad, the set up is not ideal for trying to go to windward. On Blue Yankee, we modified the rig to attach the clew strop to the main boom, thereby allowing us to use the main traveller to bring the sail closer to centerline. Having two sheets on the sail is important, both for tacking (if that's necessary), and as a safety in case the primary sheet breaks from either load or chafe."
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Thanks Cam. That's a lot of sail to raise in a wind, and on a little track. It's doesn't look feasable.

I see why everyone seems to be saying to put a 3rd reef in instead. Everything is already setup then.
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Yep...just make sure it is a deep 3rd reef and that you get extra reinforcement at the 3rd tack and clew...ALSO make sure you can actually put the 3rd TACK in the hook with the rest of the sail bundled below...You may need to rig a separate hook or other arrangement for that third reef point. Try it before you need it!!
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I always thought the idea of a storm sail was it is built much heaver then a standard cruising main and therefore can handle 50+ knots for extended periods of time.
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Old 12-22-2008
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Bubb—

I doubt most boats would have any sails up in 50+ knots. They'd generally be under bare poles and a drogue or sea anchor at that point. The mast and rigging is generally enough windage to provide drive at that point.

To paraphrase Webb Chiles from his book Return to the Sea, if the boat is being driven at seven knots under bare poles, it should probably be under bare poles. Most boats would need to be under bare poles by that definition.
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Originally Posted by bubb2 View Post
I always thought the idea of a storm sail was it is built much heaver then a standard cruising main and therefore can handle 50+ knots for extended periods of time.
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Old 12-22-2008
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Dog, Try going to weather under bare poles. If down wind is a lee shore, bare poles will not work.
If you want steerage you got to have sail up, other than running with the wind.

Last edited by bubb2; 12-22-2008 at 02:07 AM.
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Quote:
Originally Posted by camaraderie View Post
Yep...just make sure it is a deep 3rd reef and that you get extra reinforcement at the 3rd tack and clew...ALSO make sure you can actually put the 3rd TACK in the hook with the rest of the sail bundled below...You may need to rig a separate hook or other arrangement for that third reef point. Try it before you need it!!
I tie the tacks down, that's a more secure scheme, and only takes a few seconds longer. I do this because the tack sometimes shakes loose. This is not my idea, but something that Hal Roth wrote about in length IIRC. I've adopted it, and feel that it works well. Lead the line through the tack twice and then tie it as best as you can around the boom
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Very true, but if you're in a storm with 50+ knots and facing a lee shore, you've done some pretty piss poor planning somewhere along the line. Most storms that have sustained winds of 50+ knots are forecast days in advance, and you should have done something to avoid the lee shore situation two or three days prior IMHO.

Quote:
Originally Posted by bubb2 View Post
Dog, Try going to weather under bare poles. If down wind is a lee shore, bare poles will not work.
If you want steerage you got to have sail up, other than running with the wind.
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Quote:
Originally Posted by sailingdog View Post
Very true, but if you're in a storm with 50+ knots and facing a lee shore, you've done some pretty piss poor planning somewhere along the line. Most storms that have sustained winds of 50+ knots are forecast days in advance, and you should have done something to avoid the lee shore situation two or three days prior IMHO.
Dog, It has nothing to do with "piss poor planning." Pop up thunder storms can roll in one behind the other. We do not have to be talking about named storms here. I once watched a wall cloud coming for 2 to 3 hours. When it finally got to me there was one gust of 70+ and the winds for the next 8 hours ranged between 25 and 55 kts. There were one line of T-storms right behind the other. The forecast was for "chance of T-storms." It was a pop up thunder storm system. This all happen between 4pm and midnight on a summer afternoon. I was only 40 miles offshore. I really was wishing I had a storm stay sail on that boat as I was not sure the scrap of the roller furling head sail I was flying was going to hold together. Once you get them rolled up they don't do much good anyway. Had I had the option, I would have rigged storm sails as that wall cloud was as dark as night and took up the entire sky. I knew we were going to get hit.

I was not facing a lee shore as I was sailing North and it was due west and the storm came out of the ESE, however if I decided to run under bare poles. I could have picked a 30 mile strip of shore on to which to crash the boat , as your only going to sail 15 degrees either side of DDW under bare poles.

Having sail up also is more comfortable than running under bare poles because you roll allot with no sail up in a storm. Having sail up means you can quarter your seas to weather and make things less "chancy."

I have never understood why many sailors will spend all kinds of money for spare engine parts to go off shore, but never think of extra sails or storm sails.

Last edited by bubb2; 12-22-2008 at 07:16 AM.
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