Sealing my shrouds - Page 2 - SailNet Community
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post #11 of 19 Old 12-24-2008
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One challenge with some types of butyl tape is that they have a relatively low melt point, as low as 105 degrees fahrenheit. Not a big deal on a light coloured hull in northern lats, but it could be a problem on a warmer teak deck. Check the spec sheets on the tape you are thinking of using, and look for a tape with a melt point above 200 F. It will also generally be a more durable tape, with a higher elasticity rate.
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post #12 of 19 Old 12-24-2008
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If you get it from an automotive glass shop, it usually has the higher melt point, since automotive interiors get far hotter than most boats do.
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One challenge with some types of butyl tape is that they have a relatively low melt point, as low as 105 degrees fahrenheit. Not a big deal on a light coloured hull in northern lats, but it could be a problem on a warmer teak deck. Check the spec sheets on the tape you are thinking of using, and look for a tape with a melt point above 200 F. It will also generally be a more durable tape, with a higher elasticity rate.

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post #13 of 19 Old 12-24-2008 Thread Starter
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OK, I'm not familiar with this material. Is it a tape that I apply like a caulking after I've filled most of the cavity with epoxy?


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post #14 of 19 Old 12-25-2008
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After reading your deck problems I thought this idea might be kewl.

6x1-- 1/2 inch thick teak with a 1/4 inch slot and round the top sides and ends with 1/2 round router.

Screws on both ends and seal with whatever.

Rick
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post #15 of 19 Old 12-25-2008
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another option if the core is dry is to use a flexible epoxy to fill the gap, it should hold much better than a caulk. i found 1 that has a 50 percent flex, with a 600 psi strength. i would think it would hold and seal real well.
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post #16 of 19 Old 12-25-2008
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Pretty bad idea... removing it will be hellacious... and you really don't want to use epoxy on stuff you may have to remove or replace if you can avoid it.
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another option if the core is dry is to use a flexible epoxy to fill the gap, it should hold much better than a caulk. i found 1 that has a 50 percent flex, with a 600 psi strength. i would think it would hold and seal real well.

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post #17 of 19 Old 12-25-2008
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Ya, epoxy it, call me when you wanna get it out! Bring your VISA!

Why, why, why?
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post #18 of 19 Old 12-26-2008
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I believe you should ignore ALL the advice about closing up the gap with any kind of cover plate, on the top or on the bottom! Cover plates are what CAUSE the leaks! They shear the sealant, no matter what kind, right off the chainplate as it moves. What you really want is that 1/2" thick soft sealant all around the chainplate that is able to move with the chainplate and not be stressed. That will last for the life of the sealant. Do it right and it probably won't need to done for another 20 years!

You want to pour that gap full of sealant starting at the bottom if you can so no air gets trapped. I'd seal around the bottom of the chainplate with nothing more than some putty. Duxseal, used by electricians and sold in Home Depot would probably work fine. Stick the nozzle of the caulking cartridge right down to the putty and fill the gap from top to bottom, leaving a bead higher than the deck when you are done so the water will naturally tend to run off. When the sealant has curred remove the putty and you are good to go.

You can also get the foam backer strip sold for this purpose that the guys who put store front windows in use.

Note I haven't mentioned water in the core, that's a different issue you may need to deal with.
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post #19 of 19 Old 12-31-2008
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What Mike says resonates with me.

This winter, as I enter my 2nd year of ownership, I’m tracing leaks. One of which was a chain plate.

I used the butyl caulk/tape (grey in 1/2” width is available at the local home depot) around the deck entrance. It worked!

Additional notes: One of the screws that holds the cover plate does not hold; so I used a larger/longer SS screw; when thing warm up I’ll address the rotted wood issue. (Oh, that to-do list grows longer over the winter instead of shorter because I’ve been supposed to have been doing something recently).

Charlie Lincoln • Cathlamet, WA • Islander 28 #108
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