Low buck projects- Let's see 'em! - Page 95 - SailNet Community
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post #941 of 1411 Old 01-07-2014
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Re: Low buck projects- Let's see 'em!

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The best treatment for "outdoor" edges on ply is to trim them back a smidge and edge them with solid hardwood.

Makes a much better "running" surface for them to slide on as well.
I don't think I have the skill, or the tools, to do that. My workspace is an apartment balcony and a set of Ryobi rechargeable tools...
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post #942 of 1411 Old 01-08-2014
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Dehumidifer with large reservoir

I bought one of those peltier dehumidifiers to keep the moisture at bay when I am away from the boat. I live in NC, so ... well .. it can get humid.

Amazon.com - Bionaire BDQ01-UC Mini Dehumidifier - Mini Dehumidifers Amazon.com - Bionaire BDQ01-UC Mini Dehumidifier - Mini Dehumidifers



This one has a removable tank and an auto shutoff when the tank is full. It holds a few cups of water ... less than a quart.

But I found that, in the summer, the unit could fill that little tank in less than a week. I decided to modify the thing with larger capacity but still retain the auto off feature.

I ordered 2 of these:
Amazon.com: 1/2'' UNISEAL Flexible Tank Adapter (bulkhead): Pet Supplies Amazon.com: 1/2'' UNISEAL Flexible Tank Adapter (bulkhead): Pet Supplies



A plastic storage box with lid ($10 at target)

A timer ($5 at target)

and a 4" piece of scrap 1/2 PVC.

It can easily run for weeks on end without filling up the tank, and the shut off feature is retained. The container has tight lid so the moisture removed does not return to the cabin. It significantly increases the amount of moisture the humidifier can remove. Now I can rest assured that the little humidifier is doing its job even when I am away from the boat for 2 or 3 weeks at a time (which sadly I am sometimes)




used a forstner bit to drill the hole, though its probably not the best choice for plastic. (it's what I had)
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post #943 of 1411 Old 01-08-2014
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Re: Dehumidifer with large reservoir

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Originally Posted by bristol299bob View Post
I bought one of those peltier dehumidifiers to keep the moisture at bay when I am away from the boat. I live in NC, so ... well .. it can get humid.

Amazon.com - Bionaire BDQ01-UC Mini Dehumidifier - Mini Dehumidifers

This one has a removable tank and an auto shutoff when the tank is full. It holds a few cups of water ... less than a quart.

But I found that, in the summer, the unit could fill that little tank in less than a week. I decided to modify the thing with larger capacity but still retain the auto off feature.

I ordered 2 of these:
Amazon.com: 1/2'' UNISEAL Flexible Tank Adapter (bulkhead): Pet Supplies

A plastic storage box with lid ($10 at target)

A timer ($5 at target)

and a 4" piece of scrap 1/2 PVC.

It can easily run for weeks on end without filling up the tank, and the shut off feature is retained. The container has tight lid so the moisture removed does not return to the cabin. It significantly increases the amount of moisture the humidifier can remove. Now I can rest assured that the little humidifier is doing its job even when I am away from the boat for 2 or 3 weeks at a time (which sadly I am sometimes)
Impressive work, but why not just run a hose to a sink drain? Then it can pull out lots and lots of water.
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Last edited by miatapaul; 01-08-2014 at 06:58 PM.
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post #944 of 1411 Old 01-08-2014
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Re: Low buck projects- Let's see 'em!

> Impressive work, but why not just run a hose to a sink drain? Then it can pull
> out lots and lots of water.

I close all below waterline seacocks, including sink drains, when I leave the boat. That was my motivation behind increasing the capacity (guess I should have mentioned that important detail)

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Last edited by bristol299bob; 01-09-2014 at 10:34 PM.
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post #945 of 1411 Old 01-09-2014
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Re: Low buck projects- Let's see 'em!

I think this is a low buck project because it is replacing my inboard engine. I made a yuloh. The inboard had too many issues that would of taken too much time and money to repair. I am putting it in low buck thread to response to several guys in barefootnavigator`s thread about living on $500 a month, but didn`t want to disturb his thread. He has also made a yuloh and there were others that started asking about it and if there was someone who had information about it. It took me $300 in material, 2 years of research, emails, web searching, building, experimenting, and re-building to build mine, so here is my 2 cents. I`ll get pictures out as soon as I get my lazy a$$ off the couch.
I know there are those that would rather have oars and if they work for you, great. This isn`t an argument for either or. They are better for close quarters manuevering , lighter displacement boats, or crewed boats, but my need is for long distance with the minimum of ease, singlehanded, on a heavy displacement boat.
Several sources of information were used courtesy of the internet. What a great invention…sometimes.
Slieve who runs the junkrigassociation.org wrote an indepth and excellent article titled “Some Thoughts on the Yuloh” analyzing it. It is found on his sight or just by googling “Slieve yuloh”. He admits to never have built one, but he is spot on in his thoughts and very helpful to answer any questions by email.
Ben Fuller on woodenboat forum and a handful of other members were also helpful as a sounding board. Ben`s description of the yuloh is that it is like low gear in a truck. Slow, but strong to move a big load. Yuloh in their search window will give you a lot to read.
Another good start to make the size can be found both with Slieve and within Larry Pardey`s book “The Self Sufficient Sailor”. He states that it isn`t really a matter of length of the boat, but of the freeboard height. I used his book suggestions because our boats are 95% similar in dimension. I first had a oar like his, but to impart the twist needed over a long distance wore me the HE// out, so I started to look for better ways.
Of course youtube has a load of videos, but you have to search for “Yuloh, Zhujiajiao,China” to get an original view. Don`t rely on the many western copies also found on youtube. They are just hybreds anyway. The Chinese videos are the ones to watch over and over and over and over and over and over again and again and again. Watching different ones gives clues into different details one video has over the others. A key point to look for is the pivot point between boat and yuloh. You`ll figure it out.
Lastly as luck or providence would have it, I found ($3 in a fleamarket) G.R.G Worcester `s book “The Junks & Sampans of the Yangtze”. It`s a fascinating book in and of itself, but for me it had many .examples, tips and tricks of the yuloh in action back in the day and life of a chinese waterman. That is a cool book for reference. If you can get a copy, it`s worth it, but not necessary to have to build one.
In the end, after measuring once and cutting twice with a lot of cohogitating, I have a yuloh I am confident in even though I think its 30cm too long in its shaft and slightly over built, but better overbuilt than underbuilt. Sound all this like overkill to you? Maybe, but that`s what makes it fun messing about in boats.
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post #946 of 1411 Old 01-09-2014
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Re: Low buck projects- Let's see 'em!

I really look forward to pictures, maybe even a short video? My boat is 24' but I have a dedicated engine well that would have me standing no closer than two feet from the back edge of the transom. I'm not sure if a Yuloh is feasible...
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post #947 of 1411 Old 01-09-2014
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Re: Low buck projects- Let's see 'em!

Somewhere, if I recall, in this list of links, are some yuloh resources…

The Mother of All Maritime Links: Page 1 of 47

Yuloh linx
sculling....wow

http://www.simplicityboats.com/yulohpage.html

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post #948 of 1411 Old 01-13-2014
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Re: Low buck projects- Let's see 'em!

Custom cutting board/backsplash for the sink/stove.

Custom Cutting Board - TKRonaBoat


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post #949 of 1411 Old 01-13-2014
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Re: Low buck projects- Let's see 'em!

Nice. Triple duty pieces - I like that.

You better never lay your spreaders in the water, or worse with that armoury loaded beside the sink - the cabin would look like a dartboard.

I, myself, personally intend to continue being outspoken and opinionated, intolerant of all fanatics, fools and ignoramuses, deeply suspicious of all those who have "found the answer" and on my bad days, downright rude.
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post #950 of 1411 Old 01-13-2014
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Re: Low buck projects- Let's see 'em!

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Nice. Triple duty pieces - I like that.

You better never lay your spreaders in the water, or worse with that armoury loaded beside the sink - the cabin would look like a dartboard.
LOL. Good pickup Jon but if you look closely you will see that the knife block uses a clamp onto the SS pole. It gets put in a cabinet when sailing in less than ideal conditions.

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