Confusing plumbing configuration -- thoughts? - Page 2 - SailNet Community

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  #11  
Old 12-30-2008
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I may be wrong, but it seems to me the output from the tank can lead to a T rather than a diverter. One side of the T leads to the macerator pump and then to a seacock/thruhull. The other side of the T leads to the deck pumpout fitting. When pumping out via macerator, the macerator will suck waste from the tank and not suck air thru the pumpout fitting because the deck fitting will be closed. When waste is being sucked out thru the deck fitting, there shouldn't be any back flow thru the macerator because the seacock will be closed. The diverter valves have been prone to failure in my experience. A T fitting is simpler and more reliable. KISS!
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Old 12-30-2008
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First I wanted to say K.I.S.S.

Many have given the "Keep it simple Simeon"

I just wanted to take a stab at what the previous owner "may" had in mind here.

This looks to be an attempt at the "Maceration Re-Macerator Flabergastor"

What I am thinking, where the macerator pumps back toward the head.

This supposed to be manipulated in a way that the pump recirculates the holding tank contents from holding tank and then back into the holding tank!

This provides a fine chop to the holding tank and maybe additional aeration???

This is just a guess to help provide some insights as to previous owner thoughts.

But, I think some parts may be missing to work correctly.
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Old 12-30-2008
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The main reason I generally recommend using a diverter valve, rather than a Y or T splitter, is that when you're in an NDZ, the authorities will want to see the handle locked to the deck pumpout fitting.

Also, if you have a splitter rather than a diverter valve, and you leave the discharge seacock open when you go to pump out, you'll suction water up through the macerator pump and that may make it take a much longer time to empty your holding tank as well as damage the macerator pump.

The diverter valve also makes it less likely that you'll siphon water through an open seacock back into the holding tank.

Quote:
Originally Posted by jbondy View Post
I may be wrong, but it seems to me the output from the tank can lead to a T rather than a diverter. One side of the T leads to the macerator pump and then to a seacock/thruhull. The other side of the T leads to the deck pumpout fitting. When pumping out via macerator, the macerator will suck waste from the tank and not suck air thru the pumpout fitting because the deck fitting will be closed. When waste is being sucked out thru the deck fitting, there shouldn't be any back flow thru the macerator because the seacock will be closed. The diverter valves have been prone to failure in my experience. A T fitting is simpler and more reliable. KISS!
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Am I not OK with the authorities as long as I locked the waste-out seacock handle? The rest has to do with diligence.
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Old 12-30-2008
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That should do the trick too...
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Originally Posted by jbondy View Post
Am I not OK with the authorities as long as I locked the waste-out seacock handle? The rest has to do with diligence.
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Old 12-30-2008
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Quote:
Originally Posted by bubb2 View Post
I am wondering if it is plumbed this way as a way to rinse the holding tank after it was pumped. I could see that it would work if the holding tank was below the water line.
I agree, looks like a way to flush the holding tank either offshore or at the pumpout
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Old 12-30-2008
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I agree with Sailingdog - head direct to tank, tank out to a Y-valve to either the deck or the discharge pump which goes overboard.

I wonder if the pump is attached to the discharge leg of the current setup, rather than the head leg. If it were, and the Y valve was set for head to tank, the pump would be set up to go overboard.

I cruise on Canada's West Coast, where overboard discharge is still allowed except in specific areas, and the advantage of always sending waste to the holding tank is that I can pick when and where I discharge the tank, which allows me to avoid sensitive areas and spread my impact over a larger volume of water.
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Old 12-30-2008
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I love the macerator being set up to push INTO the head, and the option to have the holding tank used as a water SUPPLY for the head.

Surely, that's an April Fools diagram?
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I know this is academic since you are rebuilding the system, but I had another thought. Perhaps the PO set this up to empty holding tank. With the system as I understand it you could use the head pump as an overboard discharge device if the macerater pump failed. By flushing the head with the holding tank contents and the discharge seacock open you could bypass a failed direct over board discharge system. This would be nasty, but would be a way to empty the holding tank if all else failed. I am not saying pumping raw sewage open to the cabin via the head bowl is a good idea, but it might work.
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Old 12-30-2008
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Quote:
Originally Posted by hellosailor View Post
I love the macerator being set up to push INTO the head, and the option to have the holding tank used as a water SUPPLY for the head.

Surely, that's an April Fools diagram?
Wish it were, but I assure you it's no joke. With the diverter on the discharge leg set to the discharge thru-hull, waste is pumped overboard -- with the valve set to the tank, then it's effectively a closed loop. Holding tank as a water supply to the head is gross, but as some have suggested, could be used to rinse the tank after a pump-out.

This is effectively going to be a do-over, and something to thank the PO for (that and the half-filled holding tank -- nice touch).
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Last edited by CLucas; 12-30-2008 at 08:29 PM.
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