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-   -   How tight should my Stays be? (http://www.sailnet.com/forums/gear-maintenance/50797-how-tight-should-my-stays.html)

lapworth 01-24-2009 03:58 PM

How tight should my Stays be?
 
I have a 24' sloop and I'm not trying to push the limits on my rigging. Is there a general rule on how tight your stays should be? Thanks

Giulietta 01-24-2009 04:08 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by lapworth (Post 437401)
I have a 24' sloop and I'm not trying to push the limits on my rigging. Is there a general rule on how tight your stays should be? Thanks

Lap, welcome to Sailnet..

Please read this thread here

sailnet.com/forums/gear-maintenance/42542-adjusting-your-rig.html


The info is very good, and its easy to follow..I know the idiot that wrote it.

He is an idiot, but is a good guy..

But normally it should be around 20% of the breaking load of your wire

Alex

Giulietta 01-24-2009 04:12 PM

somehow, I can't post the link ,as it breaks.

Go to the search bar, and type "loos".

when you do it shows a whole bunch of threads, select the one called "adjusting your rig".

I am going to bump the thread for you, so you can see it in the begining.

MoonSailer 01-24-2009 04:39 PM

Just tight enough to prevent the leeward wire from sagging under normal sailing conditions. Fiberglass is not rigid and you can actually bend your hull with too much tension.

lynger1 01-24-2009 06:00 PM

i don't agree with 20% having a few sailing boat since 1972
Like mainsail said
i have mine set to around 40 % to give it some relieve from full tensions witch extenuate life if cables by years.never had fr-ailing of woven s/steel cable
and it acts like shock absorber
But like many boats most rigging is done for a price .when you start replacing stays increase the cable load capacity by min 50% and set to max 40% load
You Will have a rigging that last for a long time and saving you maintenance

Dick Pluta 01-24-2009 06:16 PM

I used to agonize over this and was scared to death of breaking my boat. A friend with an Islander Bahama 30 would regularly kick the butt of my Pearson 30, something that just shouldn't happen. I was reading an article on rig tuning that said the if a big ultralight with a hydraulic backstay doesn't bend how much damage do you think that you and an end wrench can do. I reefed down as much as I could on the backstay and picked up at least a full knot. That was about 25 years ago. I just saw the Pearson this afternoon and she's still straight.

Dick PLuta
AEGEA
Nassau, Bahamas

lynger1 01-24-2009 06:22 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Dick Pluta (Post 437433)
I used to agonize over this and was scared to death of breaking my boat. A friend with an Islander Bahama 30 would regularly kick the butt of my Pearson 30, something that just shouldn't happen. I was reading an article on rig tuning that said the if a big ultralight with a hydraulic backstay doesn't bend how much damage do you think that you and an end wrench can do. I reefed down as much as I could on the backstay and picked up at least a full knot. That was about 25 years ago. I just saw the Pearson this afternoon and she's still straight.

Dick PLuta
AEGEA
Nassau, Bahamas

Proves my point
Lynger1

Giulietta 01-24-2009 06:33 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by lynger1 (Post 437428)
i don't agree with 20% having a few sailing boat since 1972
Like mainsail said
i have mine set to around 40 % to give it some relieve from full tensions witch extenuate life if cables by years.never had fr-ailing of woven s/steel cable
and it acts like shock absorber
But like many boats most rigging is done for a price .when you start replacing stays increase the cable load capacity by min 50% and set to max 40% load
You Will have a rigging that last for a long time and saving you maintenance


You are for sure joking, recommending someone to tension the stay to 40 and 50%?? Unless your 40 and 50 is not percentage of wire breaking load..which is how we measure.

I'm outta here...

To the original poster, make sure you note who said it, ok?? Wasn't me. Just in case.

By the way, google around some of the shroud and stay manufacturers web sites, you will CLEARLY read in all of them NOT to exceed 25% of the breaking load.

lapworth 01-24-2009 07:50 PM

Hey you are all great help thanks for all the info. I was looking for something like Moonsailor explaned but I believe Giulietta gave me alot to think about.

T34C 01-24-2009 08:55 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by lynger1 (Post 437428)
i don't agree with 20% having a few sailing boat since 1972
Like mainsail said
i have mine set to around 40 % to give it some relieve from full tensions witch extenuate life if cables by years.never had fr-ailing of woven s/steel cable
and it acts like shock absorber
But like many boats most rigging is done for a price .when you start replacing stays increase the cable load capacity by min 50% and set to max 40% load
You Will have a rigging that last for a long time and saving you maintenance

OK, this is really wrong in a number of ways. First, there absolutly no point in replacing your stays with bigger so as to "increase the cable load capacity by min. 50%" While you would have stronger cables, you wouldn't have stronger pins that conect the cable to the boat, stronger chainplates, or a stronger boat. Just to use some nice round numbers, if your boats stays have a capacity of 1000# and you increase that by 50% you would have cables with a capacity of 1500#. 40% of 1500# is 600#, or 60 percent of the original cables. Your boat wasn't built for that kind of prolonged static load. I'm pretty sure the Naval Architech that designed you boat spec'd it to have the cables it does for a reason.

Do a bit more research and I'm sure you will find G-'s recommendation of 15-20% is correct.


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