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Go Back   SailNet Community > On Board > Gear & Maintenance
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  #11  
Old 01-25-2009
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Splicing double braid nylon is not much more difficult that splicing 3 strand. Go get the appropriate fid from the local guy and give it a whirl. You find it easier than you thought.

Watch this video to see exactly how fast it can be done. I am sure he slowed down to allow for his commentary and explanations. Although he is doing a becket spllce, just make the eye larger for a mooring line.

YouTube DoubleBraid Becket Splice
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  #12  
Old 01-25-2009
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Dock Lines

Nylon will stretch more, but usually it is the nylon lines that become harder as they shrink over time, whereas polyester lines tend to stay softer, and hold up to rubbing much better, as noted previously.

There was a good article on lines in general when I first joined Sailnet. Try the link here:

Understanding Cordage

I prefer Polyester at least in fresh water, although I have both types on the boat.
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  #13  
Old 01-25-2009
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Patrick Rea, many thanks for Youtube video. I've the fid from Samson but just don't know how to start. This video is very helpful indeed.
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  #14  
Old 01-25-2009
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Pdean, thanks for the link. Good info.
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  #15  
Old 01-26-2009
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Trantor,

Assuming that your lines were relatively new, you should not have chafed four lines in a short period of time. As you know, chafing is almost always the mode of line failure and something appears to be accelerating this in your case. While double braid may chafe a little faster than 3 strand, either should work well in normal docking, even in rough harbors. It seems you may need the extra shock absorbing of the more stretchy 3 strand over the characteristics of double braid, but if you went through four lines in short order on double braid, you're likely to have some problems with 3 strand. Examine exactly where the lines failed. If there is a rough spot or sharp edge, even a very small one, it will cut through a line that is flexing in a short time. A smooth round head stanchion bolt did the job for me once. Are you using proper chafing gear at the contact points?...not plastic hose. How are the other boats of comparable size and exposure to the waves in your marina handling the situation. IF something is working for them, it'll probably work for you. Did the loose cleat bolt figure in on the chafing by contacting the line...why did it become loose? Any boat supply store will know what kind of line that they are selling, so you can go there and see what the manufacturer has marked on the reel of line or on the boxes for the line. Good luck.
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Old 01-26-2009
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NCC320, my lines broke at near mid point betw dock cleats and boat cleats. These instances it definitely shocking load that snap the lines although I do see chafing betw ropes on the boat cleats but that are just sign and not too serious ...for now. I'm not the only one having broken lines. The marina mechanic advised that I tigthen all docklines to prevent shocking-loads. He said that way, my boat will move up and down with the berth and with very little side movement to stress the lines. I'm doing that now.
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  #17  
Old 01-26-2009
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Trantor,

Yours is indeed a puzzling situation. Three strand and keeping the slack to a minimum in the floating marina should help. Three strand 1/2 inch Nylon generally has a breaking strength of ~5,700 lbs. or greater. Assuming a safe working load of say10%, two lines on a cleat should handle 1140 lbs. of tensile force. That's a lot of pull unless you are in hurricane conditions. If the lines are breaking in the middle, then, if it were my boat I'd go to larger lines...maybe 2 x 3/4 inch. There is some point where the line size will be sufficient to prevent line being pulled apart in the middle. Just a thought....are you sure that the lines are either 100% polyester or 100% nylon? Recently, I was in one of the building supply stores and I saw something I have never seen before....a mixture of polypropylene and polyester. The line was three strand and white. Also, in our marina, I recently saw a good size motor cruiser tied up with polypropylene (this one was blue and white, I've seen it in stores, so I know that's what it was). Polypropylene generally doesn't have good stretch characteristics and looses its strength quickly in sunlight.
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Old 01-27-2009
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sailaway21 is just really nice sailaway21 is just really nice sailaway21 is just really nice sailaway21 is just really nice
trantor,
Dacron is of virtually the same strength as nylon.
Nylon stretches 40% over original length at parting. Dacron, or polyester, about 70% of nylon. In my book, that's plenty enough elongation, especially if you're trying to keep your boat from horsing around. Another words, given the same strain on a properly sized mooring line dacron will stretch about 30% less than nylon under the same load. (People often mistake stretch for strength.) Dacron is worth it just for it's superior abrasion resistance. I'd use a laid line versus a braided one for the same reason; superior abrasion resistance.
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Old 01-28-2009
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ok how does dacron rope looks like ? I don't think rope suppliers here is knows anything beyond nylon and polyester.
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  #20  
Old 01-28-2009
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sailingdog is just really nice sailingdog is just really nice sailingdog is just really nice sailingdog is just really nice sailingdog is just really nice
Dacron is a name-brand of polyester, like Lexan is a name-brand of polycarbonate.

Quote:
Originally Posted by trantor12020 View Post
ok how does dacron rope looks like ? I don't think rope suppliers here is knows anything beyond nylon and polyester.
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