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-   -   Any experiance with the CDI mainsail reefing system? (http://www.sailnet.com/forums/gear-maintenance/51340-any-experiance-cdi-mainsail-reefing-system.html)

jgsteven 02-09-2009 04:49 PM

Any experiance with the CDI mainsail reefing system?
 
Hello,

Does anyone have any experience with the CDI mainsail furling/reefing system?

You can view the specs online at:
CDI

I was looking at adding Lazyjacks, and came across this is an alternative. I don't currently know anyone who uses the system, but it looks interesting. Does anyone have any experience with it?

Thanks,

Joe

jgsteven 02-10-2009 05:40 PM

looks like 'no'...
 
Quote:

Originally Posted by jgsteven (Post 445713)
Does anyone have any experience with the CDI mainsail furling/reefing system?

Looks like the answer is 'no'. :p Its an interesting system, but I wonder how it would stand up to strong winds, since it is almost certainly less secure than the mainsail track on a mast.

--
Joe

Mc51 02-10-2009 09:27 PM

It looks like an easy to operate system, but I don't think I would want to give up having battens in my main sail. We have lazy jacks on our old Cal and they work great when we're bringing the main down. We leave them stowed on the mast when we raise sail and put them in place after it's up, If they are attached to the boom the battens always hang up on them when raising the main.

knothead 02-11-2009 08:22 AM

The benefits and drawbacks of behind the mast furlers have been discussed in other threads. You may want to search for them if you are considering going this route. Here's one: Behind the mast roller furling - SailNet Community

Briefly, the pros are ease of handling the cons are loss of performance.
One primary difference in the CDI system is that they are using a CDI furler.
Pretty much any furling system can be used for the purpose.
I do like the fact that they have compiled a complete package including the parts needed to modify the gooseneck and backstay attachment. And for a pretty decent price too.
I wonder about the durability though. I have a feeling that this system would work best on smaller, (25' to 30') boats. On the ones that I have installed we modified the gooseneck rather than simply mount the drum assembly above the boom on brackets.
It would probably take a rigger a good 8 to 10 hours for the installation I would guess.

JohnRPollard 02-11-2009 09:13 AM

Joe,

I have logged a fair number of miles on a boat with a behind-the-mast mainsail furling system. It was not a CDI -- can't remember the make.

It definitely is a convenient way to set and reef the mainsail. If convenience and low-cost is a priority, I can see why some folks might choose this approach.

I however would not. The loss of performance was simply not worth the trade-off for how I like to sail. It's not just that the mainsail area is less due to lack of battens and negative or at best neutral roach in the leech.

The other issue is that when sailing hard on the wind, the luff of the sail tends to deflect quite a bit from the vertical, much like a genoa luff will if the headstay tension is too soft. Knothead might be able to comment further, but I think that a fair bit of deflection is inevitable because of the nature of the beast.

Again, if convenience, cost, and simplicity are your priority rather than optimal upwind performance, maybe this would be a good system for you. My feeling is that upwind is the biggest challenge for any sailboat, so why handicap it further?

knothead 02-11-2009 11:00 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by JohnRPollard (Post 446499)
The other issue is that when sailing hard on the wind, the luff of the sail tends to deflect quite a bit from the vertical, much like a genoa luff will if the headstay tension is too soft. Knothead might be able to comment further, but I think that a fair bit of deflection is inevitable because of the nature of the beast.

John, You are exactly correct. No matter how much you tighten the wire, there is really no way to prevent the deflection of the luff. And the problem that I can see with the CDI system is that when the wire is tightened all that load is transferred to the fasteners holding the bracket on. As I said earlier, there is a stronger way to do it by modifying the gooseneck and bringing the wire down to a proper termination like a tang somewhere below the boom. But you will still have a lot of deflection in the foil.


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