Anchors; Plow v. Claw v. Delta v. Fluke - Page 2 - SailNet Community

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View Poll Results: What type anchor do you use most often?
Plow 33 28.21%
Claw 33 28.21%
Delta 28 23.93%
Fluke 34 29.06%
Multiple Choice Poll. Voters: 117. You may not vote on this poll

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  #11  
Old 03-10-2009
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Here we go again ......

you searched and didn't find many discussions on anchors ???? That's because everyone here is 100% in agreement on what to use.

Seriously tho, there is lots of info on anchors and anchoring. I researched for over 6 months on what to buy and how to use the anchor properly. I've seen 35 knots sustained for a couple of hours on one set and on another, gusts to 52 knots on a short scope, bad set, 100 deg. wind shift and did not budge either time.

BTW, you left out a few anchor types in your survey.
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Old 03-10-2009
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Quote:
Originally Posted by scottbr View Post
Here we go again ......

you searched and didn't find many discussions on anchors ???? That's because everyone here is 100% in agreement on what to use.

Seriously tho, there is lots of info on anchors and anchoring. I researched for over 6 months on what to buy and how to use the anchor properly. I've seen 35 knots sustained for a couple of hours on one set and on another, gusts to 52 knots on a short scope, bad set, 100 deg. wind shift and did not budge either time.

BTW, you left out a few anchor types in your survey.
There were discussions about anchors but no definative answers. My obsessive research has lead to more questions than answers. All the test data from mfg's say theirs is the best over the others. The independent tests I've read conflict with one another. I've looked at anchors being used by cruisers and liveaboards in marinas, the ones being hauled out, because otherwise they are on the hook. I left out "new generation" and a few others due to the availability to buy one on the fly. The market is full of the 4 basic anchors, new or used, if I needed to find one outside the US. Most tests say the "Spade" is the best, but I only left it out due to cost, however, if it is the "best" I'd buy it and be done. Some say Rocna, but I'm not sold on the rollbar concept. I've wondered if any of the rollbar anchors have ever landed upside down and not rolled over, only to set itself against rocks on the rollbar, then breakout, or worse get lodged and not breakout. SD, maybe you could explain how you arrived at a Rocna?

I'm sure this debate stirs up some dust. Its like the endless "cambelt change" debate among Ferrari owners. Nobody really knows, we just do what we think is best. That is why I started this, for real world experiences. I like everyones comments. Keep them coming...
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  #13  
Old 03-10-2009
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Hi Talisman66--you're right that when you search on this topic you sometimes find as many questions as you do answers! There are many threads, because there are no definitive answers due to the nature of the topic. Even the anchor tests differ because it all depends on so many variables--was the test done in sand, soft mud, hard mud, mud over sand, sand over rock, rock, etc.? How much chain was used, how much rode?

To some extent, and this is just my opinion, I think you have to read what's available on Sailnet and other resources, and then ultimately go with your gut. That's what I did. The boat we purchased a couple months ago only had one anchor, so we really had to buy another. The existing anchor is a Fortress, which I think is a good second anchor, but I wanted a non-danforth style anchor as our primary.

So I read what I could read, searched as much as possible, and listened to what folks said on this board. Then I just made a gut call on it. For what it's worth (which probably isn't much), I just purchased the Rocna (sailingdog will be happy to know).

Good luck on your anchor quest...
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Old 03-11-2009
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I use a 50lb CQR copy and a Bruce and danforth backup. I know there is newer technology out there but these have worked well for me. I do have 350' of all chain on a 33' boat so this likely helps a lot. I used to have the Bruce as my primary anchor but I noticed it held poorly in a weed bottom so I switched and the CQR seems to hold in more of a variety of bottoms and high winds.
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Old 03-11-2009
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Talisman66 View Post
...Some say Rocna, but I'm not sold on the rollbar concept. I've wondered if any of the rollbar anchors have ever landed upside down and not rolled over, only to set itself against rocks on the rollbar, then breakout, or worse get lodged and not breakout. ....
Really, have a look at the Bulwagga. It's design ensures that no matter what angle it lands at, it digs in (when I first got it, I had to learn the hard way to be ready for it to seemingly set instantly, and if I had too firm a grip on the rode, it'd nearly pull me over the bow ;-)

And when shifting, it resets very quickly.

Bulwagga Marine Anchors, the world's most dependable boat anchor

(note: I have no affilliation with the manufacturers, other than as a very satisfied customer)

FWIW, I also have a Fortress and collapsible claw/grappling hook anchors as backups or occasional stern anchor...
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  #16  
Old 03-11-2009
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I'm not a big fan of the Bulwagga anchor. First, it is far harder to stow due to the three fluke design. Second, the third fluke, which doesn't bury is liable to snag the rode, and might prevent the anchor from resetting if that happens. Third, the mechanical connection between the stock and the flukes seems to be a weak point IMHO.

A one piece anchor with no moving parts is more reliable with greater durability. That's why I went with the Rocna. The Manson Supreme is supposed to be almost as good, at least according to Maine Sail, who owns both. I chose the Rocna because I thought the design and construction was a bit better, even though it did have a pretty steep price premium.

Rocna claims that the Manson Supreme is a copy of their anchor, and I'm likely to agree. If you consider that three of the anchors Manson makes are definitely copies, it seems likely that their fourth one would be too. Ray=Bruce, Plough=CQR, Sand=Danforth ===> Supreme=Rocna.

I'm also not a big fan of keeping your "storm" anchor down below. IMHO, it makes much more sense to size your primary big enough to deal with a storm if one comes up. Most people have undersized primary anchors and have to resort to storm anchors, tandem anchoring or some other method when the weather gets nasty... if the primary is properly sized, then you don't have those worries.
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Old 03-11-2009
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Quote:
Originally Posted by sailingdog View Post
I'm not a big fan of the Bulwagga anchor.
Folks can be very passionate about anchors, and certainly everyone has different requirements and expectations, and I certainly do not have the experience that you and others have, so I'm not wanting to get into a major debate about them, but still wanted to comment on your impressions of the Bulwagga, just to offer an alternative viewpoint...

Quote:
First, it is far harder to stow due to the three fluke design.
Agreed. It's also rather ugly IMO, and can "bite" your fingers if you're not careful. It definitely needs to be kept on a bow roller (but on a bow roller, it's no more difficult to store than any other anchor).

Quote:
Second, the third fluke, which doesn't bury is liable to snag the rode, and might prevent the anchor from resetting if that happens.
Well, given its design, and having handled one alot, I can't see how it would. There's nothing really to snag that the rode wouldn't easily pass over it if/when the anchor shifted around and tension was put on the rode. I don't see snagging as a real possibility (not sure I could even get it to snag if I tried).

Quote:
Third, the mechanical connection between the stock and the flukes seems to be a weak point IMHO.
Maybe. Though I don't share that impression, and have never heard of one breaking. Any anchor can have its limit exceeded, so you have to have the right size for your boat (same as any other type).

Quote:
A one piece anchor with no moving parts is more reliable with greater durability.
I think that depends on what you mean by "reliability" and "durability". I find the Bulwagga design to be the most reliable I've used, or seen used (i.e. sets reliably and in every type of bottom, resets reliably and quickly, holds well) and it seems more than durable enough (again, if sized properly for the boat).

In fact, the sliding shaft is good insurance if it gets hung up, and thus can provide more reliable retrieval. So it's certainly a matter of perspective whether a one piece anchor is necessarily more reliable or durable.

Quote:
That's why I went with the Rocna.
Rocna was my second choice, and I think it's a really good looking anchor. I'd much prefer to have that hanging off my bow than the Bulwagga, but in the end, it's not about form, but function. I'd rather have an ugly anchor if I can rely on it more.

Quote:
...

I'm also not a big fan of keeping your "storm" anchor down below. IMHO, it makes much more sense to size your primary big enough to deal with a storm if one comes up. Most people have undersized primary anchors and have to resort to storm anchors, tandem anchoring or some other method when the weather gets nasty... if the primary is properly sized, then you don't have those worries.
Agreed. Other than occasionally just tossing out a lighter anchor from the stern when stopping briefly, I use the Bulwagga for all "real" anchoring, and then don't have to worry about any surprises.
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Old 03-11-2009
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I wouldn't recommend Fortress or any fluke-type anchor in a reversing current/wind situation.
Everyone says that but my experience so far does not bear this out. In any case, there are other ways to deal with significantly reversing winds/currents - however setting ability and holding power of Fortress (and the fact that I can actually lift even the largest one, and it does not break off my anchor roller either while sailing ).
I would rather not have anything weighting over 50lbs with sharp ends and not bolted down on the bow of my boat.
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Quote:
Originally Posted by patrickstickler View Post
Folks can be very passionate about anchors, and certainly everyone has different requirements and expectations, and I certainly do not have the experience that you and others have, so I'm not wanting to get into a major debate about them, but still wanted to comment on your impressions of the Bulwagga, just to offer an alternative viewpoint...

Agreed. It's also rather ugly IMO, and can "bite" your fingers if you're not careful. It definitely needs to be kept on a bow roller (but on a bow roller, it's no more difficult to store than any other anchor).

Well, given its design, and having handled one alot, I can't see how it would. There's nothing really to snag that the rode wouldn't easily pass over it if/when the anchor shifted around and tension was put on the rode. I don't see snagging as a real possibility (not sure I could even get it to snag if I tried).

Maybe. Though I don't share that impression, and have never heard of one breaking. Any anchor can have its limit exceeded, so you have to have the right size for your boat (same as any other type).
Any point that has two surfaces in friction under pressure like the bulwagga stock does is going to wear through the galvanization, meaning that those areas will likely become exposed to corrosion more quickly. That's a big factor in durability.

Quote:
I think that depends on what you mean by "reliability" and "durability". I find the Bulwagga design to be the most reliable I've used, or seen used (i.e. sets reliably and in every type of bottom, resets reliably and quickly, holds well) and it seems more than durable enough (again, if sized properly for the boat).

In fact, the sliding shaft is good insurance if it gets hung up, and thus can provide more reliable retrieval. So it's certainly a matter of perspective whether a one piece anchor is necessarily more reliable or durable.
My argument against the sliding shaft and the "rock slot" on the Manson Supreme is simple—how can the anchor know if the rode's change of position is due to the intentional attempt to retrieve it? It can't, so a wind or current shift could accidentally lead to the anchor being pulled free and not able to reset.

Quote:
Rocna was my second choice, and I think it's a really good looking anchor. I'd much prefer to have that hanging off my bow than the Bulwagga, but in the end, it's not about form, but function. I'd rather have an ugly anchor if I can rely on it more.

Agreed. Other than occasionally just tossing out a lighter anchor from the stern when stopping briefly, I use the Bulwagga for all "real" anchoring, and then don't have to worry about any surprises.
I think the Rocna or Manson Supreme set as well the Bulwagga without its durability, stowage, or design issues.
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Old 03-11-2009
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Talisman66 View Post
There were discussions about anchors but no definative answers. My obsessive research has lead to more questions than answers. All the test data from mfg's say theirs is the best over the others. The independent tests I've read conflict with one another. I've looked at anchors being used by cruisers and liveaboards in marinas, the ones being hauled out, because otherwise they are on the hook. I left out "new generation" and a few others due to the availability to buy one on the fly. The market is full of the 4 basic anchors, new or used, if I needed to find one outside the US. Most tests say the "Spade" is the best, but I only left it out due to cost, however, if it is the "best" I'd buy it and be done. Some say Rocna, but I'm not sold on the rollbar concept. I've wondered if any of the rollbar anchors have ever landed upside down and not rolled over, only to set itself against rocks on the rollbar, then breakout, or worse get lodged and not breakout. SD, maybe you could explain how you arrived at a Rocna?

I'm sure this debate stirs up some dust. Its like the endless "cambelt change" debate among Ferrari owners. Nobody really knows, we just do what we think is best. That is why I started this, for real world experiences. I like everyones comments. Keep them coming...

There is no definitive answer.... you'll just have to go with who and what you trust. Most of the boats in my area of the Great Lakes use either the Bruce or CQR, beacuase they've worked for years, although I've seen a couple drag past me in a storm, while I sat tight. I did lots of research and went with a Rocna based on the many recommendations I received on the forums and from the testing video that Maine Sail did on a few anchors by himself.


I'm not sure why you'd want to buy one "on the fly" are you transient that you can't wait for a shipment.
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