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  #21  
Old 03-18-2009
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As you say: use polyurathane. Osmosis damage is also possible onthe deck due to water penetration. Polyurathane paint is good to overcome water passage. The other advantage is, you paint only ones and use it for a very long time. Other paints are not good on the deck and probably will be affected fromsun, water and your feet. Use polyuratane, it will be less costly in the long run.
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  #22  
Old 03-18-2009
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I think tager on the right track, get what's important accomplished, if it needs sails, run'n rigging, seacocks etc,etc. do that first. work the deck little at a time, go sail when you can, work on the deck when you can't.

If your lucky you'll have break points in the deck, allowing you to do sections at a time without a visual break point in the final finish. When I did my Islander, I did elec. first, then new outboard, then rigging, then sails, then repaint ( with Brightside ) the cabin, then foredeck, then sidedeck, then cockpit, then refinished the spars, then all new canvas.

Took 10 months but, we sailed when we wanted to and worked on the boat when we didn't. In the end, what started as a eye sore taking up slip space, that people were tired of looking at ( before I bought it ) ended up having those same people waiting for the forsale sign to go up when they heard I bought another, bigger boat. It sold within 8 hrs of putting a sign on it

Same thing is happening now with my Tayana, ....................


Ya know, coming from offroad racing background where you come home on a Sunday afternoon and by 8pm the bike was in 100 pieces with only 7-10 days to get it ready for the next event, the hardest thing I had to wrap my head around when we started sailing was, in sailing there is no clock, sh*t gets done when it done, in the meantime you try to enjoy it
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Last edited by poopdeckpappy; 03-18-2009 at 01:48 PM.
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  #23  
Old 03-18-2009
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Quote:
Originally Posted by tager View Post
... The gelcoat on the decks is old, thin, flaking in places, and generally looks a bit crappy. ...
Seems like you'd be best off leaving the deck alone, it sounds like your painting idea will transform a bit crappy situation into something akin to a total mess. Doing a paint job that will improve the deck isn't just a question of the cost of proper marine paint, it's the many hours needed to properly prep the deck for that paint. Buy some new sails and enjoy your sailing.
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  #24  
Old 04-17-2009
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Might want to check this out:
How to Paint Your Own Deck
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Old 04-17-2009
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Question Just a thought

Just a thought, but if this is a new second hand boat, painting the decks straight away is likely to be a bad idea, after all once you've had the boat for a while your almost garunteed to want a fitting in a different place.

If you've already spent countless hours repainting the deck with all the fittings in the original layout you'll be reticent to change anything, however if you sail the boat for a while, you can change fitting locations almost willy nilly knowing that when you eventually get around to painting the deck all past sins will be hidden

I've a backgroud in racing dinghys, we never used to topcoat a new boat straight away, we used to change that much in the first season it made more sense to stay in primer for a while

Just my 2c
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Old 04-17-2009
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Good call on the waiting to rearrange the deck. I am starting to redo a LOT of running rigging.
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Old 04-22-2009
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tager,

Actually, you could go to the paint store and buy some latex house paint...some that they mixed the wrong color for someone,...I'm sure you could save a few bucks there too. As for new sails, I read once about a guy using a recut blue poly tarp...they only cost about $5-6.

Even on an old boat...do it right. It'll save you money in the long run, and you won't be redoing it over and over. And the boat might look nicer.

Most of the marine products are marine products for a purpose...people have, through trial and error and by testing over time, determined that the product has to be of a certain quality to stand up in the marine environment.
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