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Go Back   SailNet Community > On Board > Gear & Maintenance
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  #11  
Old 03-17-2009
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You could get rid of the cotter pin completely and close up the wide spot in the mast slot (gate) with a couple of pieces of aluminum plate screwed to the side of the mast. Don't close it up completely, just narrow the opening down to the same width as the slot in the rest of the mast. Your sail slides will drop all the way down to the boom when the sail is lowered. This will also allow you to reef from the cockpit without removing any of the sail slides. Of course you will have to remove the aluminum plates if you remove the sail, but this is a small price to pay for the convenience of reefing from the cockpit.

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  #12  
Old 03-18-2009
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Backstay Tensioner replacement

So today's project is the split backstay (see below for update on reef point) As per insurance requirements, "the backstay tensioner must be replaced with an appropriate mechanical unit".



As you can see, it's really just a length of line tied off with no proper way to adjust it. It runs through a wire splice at the top, and through a shackle bolted to the deck at the bottom. I assume a turnbuckle would do the job - however, I'm not sure if there's a better way for a fractional rig, especially one with a split backstay, something a bit more readily tuneable perhaps? FYI, the block at the top of the split is just a basic round original 1970s block, with the topping lift hanging off the connection to the rest of the backstay.

Thursday's projects are installing hose from the sink drain to the thruhull (yes, it currently has a sink - that doubles as a step once you step into the companionway - which apparently drains directly into the bilge - and no bilge pump. Don't ask. Many of the "creature comforts" aboard had been removed, apparently in an attempt at weight reduction for racing.), an attempt at reseating the head and filing down a jagged metal edge on the luff foil. I seem to recall that once upon a time I had a life... and it's only been a few weeks!

As for the reefing cringle, the battle lines have been drawn. We went down to the boat last night, mostly to do a full clean. We talked about the reefing system... well, argued about the reefing system. He feels that simply raising the boom to its highest point will suffice, and doesn't seem concerned about the gap between boom and reefing point. He is adamantly opposed to removing the pin to let the bottom two slides fall below.

So am I being the nut to insist on getting that point lower? Does it really matter that much? Will the integrity of the sail be compromised, potentially resulting in a rip, either at the mast or at that fore diamond reefing cringle? (I realize that line will have to be incredible loose, but I'm concerned about the odd angle of force...)

So we've discovered what's going to make this project boat difficult - two headstrong individuals with separate sailing backgrounds coming together on one project I think this is going to turn into a question of "Do I want to be right? Or do I want to be happy?" Any tips there?
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  #13  
Old 03-18-2009
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Thanks heinzir and Faster - I think I will certainly be replacing the cunningham end with a hook. Significantly quicker to attach and to shake out.

Does anyone recognize what the Sigma on the sail is? Could it be from the original? As I believe Faster mentioned in a previous thread, the (relatively new looking) headsails appear to have been made by Thunderbird sails (my apologies on the confusion that they were from a Thunderbird) though the main and downwind sails (older) all appear to be from Macken.

** Nevermind! took a look at the one other swiftsure I can find pics of - same sail. So original 1974 main sail...
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Last edited by serah; 03-18-2009 at 06:11 PM.
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  #14  
Old 03-18-2009
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Serah,
Regarding the reefing and boom height question.
As I think you know, the idea behind reefing a main sail is to 1) reduce total sail area and 2) reduce sail area primarily at the top of the mast so raising the boom to reef kind of negates this purpose by raising the sail higher into the stronger winds aloft. A few inches in boom height may not matter that much but I would shoot for reefing at the height you normally have the boom at. The higher up the mast the sail is the more leverage it has to push the boat over in a stiff breeze.
For the split back stay you have wouldn't some small hardware with either fiddle blocks or double blocks work? Think of the pulleys involved with a main sheet or boom vang.
It sounds to me as though you have a pretty good handle on much of the standard rigging.
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  #15  
Old 03-19-2009
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Serah—

You really do want to have the cringle for the reefing point come down as close as possible to the boom. For instance, the higher up it is, the more slack that the reefing line has to have, and the less control you have over the reefed sail's shape. Ideally, you want a reefed sail to be as flat as possible, since you're in a high-wind situation and need to depower the boat as much as possible. Not being able to tighten the reefing cringle down to the boom and mast as close as possible means that you can't shape the sail. This is in addition to CalebD's point about raising the boom moving the center of effort higher, which is what you're trying to avoid doing.

As for the split backstay. Attach a block for wire to it... and then attach a piece of wire to one side, run it through the block and terminate it with a fiddle block on the other end. then put a fiddle block with becket and cam cleat on the bottom on the hull on the other side. Tie a line to the becket and run it up reeve it between the two blocks and then through the cam cleat, and you'll have a nice 8:1 backstay adjuster.

To get the blocks, buy a Garhauer boomvang block setup, like their series 25 UAG 4-1, shown here, currently on sale. Only $76 or so. You'll need a short piece of wire rope that has a toggle on one end and a fork on the other and a wire rope block with a fork on it to attach to the backstay—but any good rigging shop can set you up with that.



Photo courtesy of Garhauer Marine, click to go to their website.

It'll basically end up looking like this Harken setup, but 8:1 not 12:1, image courtesy of Harken.com

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You know what the first rule of sailing is? ...Love. You can learn all the math in the 'verse, but you take
a boat to the sea you don't love, she'll shake you off just as sure as the turning of the worlds. Love keeps
her going when she oughta fall down, tells you she's hurting 'fore she keens. Makes her a home.

—Cpt. Mal Reynolds, Serenity (edited)

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Last edited by sailingdog; 03-19-2009 at 08:28 AM.
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  #16  
Old 03-19-2009
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Re your backstay... replacing that piece of line with a multipart tackle (6:1 min) will probably get you where you need to be. If you're worried about the security of the adjustable part, then have a wire piece made up that loosely competes the current backstay, and connect it to the deck and the split part. It will slacken as you tension the backstay adjuster, but provide a safety in the unlikely event that the adjusting tackle were to part.

Our boat is a similar frac rig to yours, with perhaps more severely swept spreaders. I've just replaced the shrouds and headstay with new wire, but have gone to an all-spectra backstay system, and a cascading 12:1 on the same split arrangement that you have.

And I agree with you (and the others) that you should be getting the reef tack down to the normal gooseneck position. Close the slot as heinzir suggests, or learn to live with letting out a couple of slides.

I think you're doing great here, btw!
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  #17  
Old 03-20-2009
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We had a productive night last night (though no resolution to the reefing point battle.) I'm not sure if I mentioned this: we bought the boat so we could use her. We've decided that we are not going to undertake any projects that will keep us off the water (excluding a haul & paint in the fall, and possibly repairing the delaminated foredeck - we'll figure details on that one out when it's a bit warmer out) Another thing of note is that though I'm relatively handy, bigger projects tend to intimidate me, especially those that require drilling/cutting and in general putting more holes in the boat. However, I've insisted that I be the one who does most of the work on Samurai - mostly in the interest of learning these skills, but also so that if something does go wrong, I (kind of) know how the systems work. I did most of the initial rewiring (with the boy's excellent guidance of course) of the lights and the bilge pump. Anyway, just trying to explain my fascination with this, and why what seems to be simple projects seem momentous to me.

The projects we've been focusing on have been ones that make it more comfortable to be out. We knocked off three projects last night, two of which needed to be done before we could comfortably spend any time aboard:
1. Attached drain and hose to sink and connected it to the thruhull. This drove us nuts on the trip home - dishes were done in a bucket, usually on deck in the snow. No more, thank you. Also, it's nice to have somewhere to wash your hands. This was "my" project - first time using a jigsaw in anything but ideal shop conditions. The contortions required to cut while laying on your stomach in the bilge! The reason we chose to cut a piece out of the bulkhead was because there was no way the hose could run from drain the thruhull without dips in the hose for water to collect/clog in.


*please note the beautiful 1970s original cushions - in mint condition!!

2. Unbolting the head and remounting it. This still had the original 1970s non-stainless wood screws (the ones with the square heads) "holding" (read: the head itself had about two inches of give in all directions when sat on, or pumped). We drilled new holes, filled the old ones with sikaflex, made an attempt at removing the rust stains and remounted her. Solid as can be now. Also, as per the surveyor's recommendation, we poured a tablespoon or so of vegetable oil into the bowl, and pumped it through - this trick works remarkably well! It was incredibly difficult to do before, requiring both hands and body weight to persuade it to pump - now she quite happily pumps away! Some of the seals are obviously shot (water squirts out the handle as you pump - lovely!) but they no longer make seal kits for this model of Bryden Boy (I think that's the make) If anyone happens to know someone who has extra parts kicking around...
3. Very simple project of cutting a thick dowel to length so as to fit in the "hanging locker" This boat is great for relatively inaccessible storage (under the v-berth and setees) or non-dry storage (huge lazarettes and bilge storage) but little for quick-access.

We haven't touched the jagged luff foil, or the backstay yet. It's rained every night we've been down - surprise, surprise (well, it is early spring in Vancouver!) Actually, we haven't even given her deck a proper scrub yet Sunday is the day though! Supposed to be sunny, and we'll see how this lady actually sails
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  #18  
Old 03-20-2009
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Serah

If you've got a head you can't get parts for, the Jabsco heads are quite inexpensive these days, under $200, many rebuild kits run upwards of $50 so the difference isn't all that much and you get something new. Not the quality of a good Raritan, or others, but certainly servicable.

We're off to Bowen Island tomorrow, will keep an eye out for you on the Bay Sunday (if you get out there!)

btw- nice job on the sink drain... using expensive hose too!!
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Old 03-20-2009
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From what Peggie Hall said on another forum, if the head is in need of replacement, a good option is to buy the base and pump for a Raritan PHC or PHII head and re-use the bowl. She said that most bowls with four bolts will fit the base and pump setup. The Raritan PHC and PHII are among the most reliable of manual heads and doing it this way you save considerably on shipping and on the cost of buying a new head.
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New England

You know what the first rule of sailing is? ...Love. You can learn all the math in the 'verse, but you take
a boat to the sea you don't love, she'll shake you off just as sure as the turning of the worlds. Love keeps
her going when she oughta fall down, tells you she's hurting 'fore she keens. Makes her a home.

—Cpt. Mal Reynolds, Serenity (edited)

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  #20  
Old 03-20-2009
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Quote:
Originally Posted by sailingdog View Post
From what Peggie Hall said on another forum, if the head is in need of replacement, a good option is to buy the base and pump for a Raritan PHC or PHII head and re-use the bowl. She said that most bowls with four bolts will fit the base and pump setup. The Raritan PHC and PHII are among the most reliable of manual heads and doing it this way you save considerably on shipping and on the cost of buying a new head.
Not a bad idea, SD... but I reckon that the Raritan parts (pump) will run more than a Jabsco head complete - of course the quality will be better.
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