Polysulfide sealant and outside temperature? - SailNet Community

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  #1  
Old 03-19-2009
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Polysulfide sealant and outside temperature?

Hi all,
I'm planning to rebed my chainplates--I asked a question previously for opinions on which sealant and got great help (thank you). The 3M 101 polysulfide sealant specs state that "service temperature" is įF -40 to 180. I assume that's once cured.

Does anyone know if there are temperature limitations for both application, and also subsequent temperatures while its curing (which can be 2 - 3 weeks)?

I ask because I might do this over the weekend--the highs will be in the mid-40s where the boat is in New England, but the lows could dip to the upper 20s. This cycle will continue over coming weeks as the temp creeps up. Will it cure properly in these conditions?

Thanks!
-J
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Anyone? Anyone? Adler? Anderson? Bueller?
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Old 03-20-2009
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The application

The application range for 3M 101, & all their other marine sealants, is 40f to 100f. I would not apply it if the temps will dip below 40 during the cure..
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Old 03-20-2009
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Maine Sail View Post
The application range for 3M 101, & all their other marine sealants, is 40f to 100f. I would not apply it if the temps will dip below 40 during the cure..
Thanks Main Sail. So quick question then--how does one rebed chainplates up north? Temps will be dipping below 40 degrees in New England well after the boat gets launched, which will be in about 4 weeks. That means I really need to rebed the chainplates now so it has several weeks to cure. But temps at night will be well below the 40s. Do people do this in the middle of summer instead? Seems that would be a problem too, since you'd have to take the boat out of comission for so long.

Thoughts? I really appreciate the help.
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if you have power at the yard how about a small tent made of plastic around the chainplate and a 20 watt light bulb in the tent. if you want to avoid putting out light how about a simple heat tape for water pipes, they turn on at around 36 degrees.

put the poly on, wrap the chainplate with the heat tape. put a cardboard box with duct tape or some plastic to keep the heat in

edit here is one its 7 watts a foot turns on at 38 degrees. if they are longer than you want you can cut most of em down. just dip the end in liquid tape a few times to seal and insulate the end.
water pipe heating cable, insulation water, Easy Heat AHB-115 120-Volt 7-Watt Water Pipe Heating Tape - OneStopShopCatalog.com

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Not a bad idea, scottyt. Our boat currently has a cover with frame, so that helps. I'm wondering though if leaving something on like a light or the pipe heater, for weeks, would all right though. The boat is 300 miles away, so I can't check on it regularly, or even make sure that my power cable stays plugged in at the outlet that's about 75 feet away from the boat. Hmm...
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OK, so I just called 3M's Marine line (didn't know they had one) for technical support and asked them. They said the 3M 101 needs to be above 40 degrees when you're applying it, and ideally during the first 5 hours or so, for it to set properly. After that, if the temperature drops below 40 it's OK while it's curing. It will just slow down the cure time.

So the point is that I can apply it. We might STILL want to consider a heat source to warm it up and get it to cure faster. But according to 3M, the cold temperatures won't harm the bond, just the time to full cure.

So, with that being said, would you rebed your chainplates now, knowing that they had to be ready for use in a month, in New England? Highs are only around 50 up there now and probably won't be breaking 60 degrees before in a month. But if I wait to do this when it's warmer, the mast will be stepped, and that sounds like a huge PITA to me.

Certainly open to suggestions...
-J
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J

A Sabre 34 is a beautiful boat. Wouldn't you rather do the job right the first time and lose a little sailing time versus having to do the job again and lose a lot of sailing time. Just a thought.

Jeff
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You..

You don't need to wait for them to fully cure before use. Remember the sealant is acting as only that, a "sealant", The mechanical fittings, or the nuts and bolts that hold the stanchion, require no cure for use.

Also beyond the point skimming over polysulfide is a moisture cure product meaning the more humidity it is exposed to the faster it will cure. You can use your boat fine minutes after bedding a stanchion provided you don't use the Don Casey two step method..

I usually wait until later in April to do bedding other wise I do them one at a time over the season but then again I am about 300 yard from my boat not 300 miles. If 3M says it's then go for it..
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Maine Sail View Post
You don't need to wait for them to fully cure before use. Remember the sealant is acting as only that, a "sealant", The mechanical fittings, or the nuts and bolts that hold the stanchion, require no cure for use.

Also beyond the point skimming over polysulfide is a moisture cure product meaning the more humidity it is exposed to the faster it will cure. You can use your boat fine minutes after bedding a stanchion provided you don't use the Don Casey two step method..

I usually wait until later in April to do bedding other wise I do them one at a time over the season but then again I am about 300 yard from my boat not 300 miles. If 3M says it's then go for it..
Thanks Main Sail. I'd like to take advantage of the mast being out so I can do them all at once, plus I'd like to inspect them before the coastal sail home. Not sure if you realized I'm asking about chainplate rebedding, not stanchion, though not sure if it matters.

Sooo, I could wait and do it in two weeks, when I'll be back up there again and it'll be warmer (but only 2 weeks from launch). OR, I can do it this weekend when it's cooler but 1 month from launch. What do you think?
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