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Go Back   SailNet Community > On Board > Gear & Maintenance
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  #11  
Old 03-24-2009
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Make sure you read all the fine print on that top climber. Most folks rig a dedicated line just for the TC with the exact recommended line. Then of course there is the issue of how to get up the first time to set the line.
The idea of the TC it to go it alone but your first time plan on some help.
Bring an extra light line because once you make it to the top you don't want to go all the way down and back up again for a small part.
A helper and some small stuff in your pack saves the day.

Also what some folks do is to tie a halyard to the chair and have someone tail the line as a safty. Maybe overkill but a line that has recently been used for several hundred pounds of pull makes me feel better.

I'm the out of shape guy so I probably couldn't do it but two of the guys I sail with just use a halyard and haul themselves up. I tail the winch with both hands. I find that I can not crank with one hand and tail with the other. The winches are self tailing but I wouldn't trust that with a guy aloft.
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  #12  
Old 03-24-2009
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Maine sail -- another great post. Where is the defect in this picture. (Hard to see is right!)


'dog -- Got it. No going up on the hard. (Well, maybe just a few feet to test out the rig.) Can I just measure the length of the clevis pins and cotter pins, to determine their size? I'm tempted to take pictures of them in front of a measuring tape, so I can look at them later.

David -- I have the separate the line for the TC. Actually I bought the TC used and it comes with the line. I'll have to ask the guy if it's the exact line that ATN sells with it. Either way I'll check it to make sure it's the right size. I'm figuring to attach the TC's rope to the main halyard. And I'll use the spinnaker halyard as the secondary, using one of those knots recommended in another thread. IIRC, the TC has a clip on it that I could attach to the safety rope using that knot. Good idea on the small line for hauling things up.

I really can't wait to go up. Funny how that works. A couple of weeks ago it scared me to no end. Now I'm psyched and can't wait. I'll be able to straighten out the bent windex "arm". I can replace the burnt-out anchor light. I can see about putting a more powerful bulb in the deck light. (The current one is really dim.) And I'll be able to get a look at the mystery antenna, and maybe figure out what it's for.


Thanks for the great replies.
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  #13  
Old 03-24-2009
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One point on the Top Climber. Make sure the shackle is installed the right way. If installed the wrong way, it can come loose, which would be less than pleasant for you... or anyone standing under you for that matter.
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  #14  
Old 03-24-2009
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Quote:
Originally Posted by sailingdog View Post
One point on the Top Climber. Make sure the shackle is installed the right way. If installed the wrong way, it can come loose, which would be less than pleasant for you... or anyone standing under you for that matter.
LOL, I hadn't thought about the other guy.

Not sure which shackle you mean (and what the right/wrong way is). I'll take a look at it when it gets here.
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Old 03-24-2009
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50' is a long climb unless you have no help and have to go up that way

We have the climber on Zzzoom and prefer to be winched up with two halyards One to lift and one just in case

I have never been that comfy on ONE line
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1981 J24 Tangent 2930
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If a dirty bottom slows you down what do you think it does to your boat
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  #16  
Old 03-24-2009
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Bene505 View Post
Maine sail -- another great post. Where is the defect in this picture. (Hard to see is right!)

I put that in there to show why and how difficult it can be. That fitting was junked because the owner used and under sized pin and made the hole out of round in doing so.

The correct size pin in the correct sized hole distributes the loads the way they are intended. With an oblong hole you will have stress points that are uneven and could cause or lead to a failure.

Look close and you'll see how out of round it really is.

Professionals, at least good ones, would pick up on a problem like this in seconds
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  #17  
Old 03-24-2009
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Humbled. Enough said.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Maine Sail View Post
I put that in there to show why and how difficult it can be. That fitting was junked because the owner used and under sized pin and made the hole out of round in doing so.

The correct size pin in the correct sized hole distributes the loads the way they are intended. With an oblong hole you will have stress points that are uneven and could cause or lead to a failure.

Look close and you'll see how out of round it really is.

Professionals, at least good ones, would pick up on a problem like this in seconds
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  #18  
Old 03-24-2009
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You make a good point billyruffn. I often encourage my customers to take into consideration how they are planning to use the boat in the near future when deciding how long to put off maintenance of their rigging. If they are planning to be cruising the Caribbean in the next year or so. I strongly urge them to replace the rigging here.

Unfortunately, that's the way it often is. I find myself in the position of trying to convince people to change their priorities. Replacing a set of standing rigging is a big expenditure. I fully understand when someone is trying to extend the life of it all they can before biting the bullet.

As much as I might agree with your analysis of the point loaded StaLok MainSail, I'm pretty sure that it would be near the bottom of my priority list on most all of the boats that I inspect.
It's not easy to get people to spend money on their rigging and most boats have much bigger issues.

The reality of it is this. Rigging is marvelously forgiving. I know this without a doubt.
I have seen some of the most horrendous examples come through my shop and most of them had served for years.
There is another reality however. The sea is not forgiving at all. It only takes one screw up to ruin your day and possibly end your life.

So most of us, keeping those two things in mind will, if we are smart;
Be reasonable about how we take care of our rigging and realize that it doesn't last forever and needs to be inspected and maintained. (Now, as to whether or not someone is capable of performing a perfect inspection or just a competent one the first few times? Who can say? Only the man himself.)
We will also realize that there is a limit as to how much we should test our rigging. That limit should be based on what kind of shape it's in, how old it is and how much confidence we have in the guy who inspects and maintains it.
If we race, are planning to cross an ocean or go cruising or if we want to shoot a BFS video for our favorite website, then we need to have rigging that we can push to a higher level.
If we just want to load up the kids and a six-pack and sail around the bay on a nice afternoon one or two days a week. Then our standards don't have to be quite as high.

I don't want anyone to think that I advocate letting your rigging go. Just the opposite is true. The rigging is what makes it a sailboat. It's more important that the damn engine, the electronics, the fancy electric head or anything else.
But, at the same time. There are times in life when you may have to run your tires a little bald, or wear socks with holes in them or even put off a new forestay.

If you are a prudent sailor, and don't go buying new chart plotters or fancy radio's when you know that you have cracked swages on your 15 year old rig. You don't push the rig when you should reef. And don't sail when the conditions reach a certain point. Then your rigging will probably not fail you.

Now, after saying all that, let me add this.
I charge one hour labor to do an inspection at my dock. Andrew lifts my fat butt up with the crane and as long as it takes less that one hour, that's what the customer pays. Not a bad deal.
If we go to the boat, the customer pays travel and for two men. Still, not a bad deal.
A good rigger can be a source of peace of mind. Unfortunately, a bad rigger can be a source of a false sense of security.
I am a strong believer that a man should be able to take care of his whole boat. Rigging included. But nobody knows this stuff instinctually. So hiring a trusted rigger might be a good place to start learning.
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Old 03-25-2009
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I realize the pin being the right size is a BIG deal BUT


With #2930 being my second 1981 J24 ,it is also the second rig i have found fom the factory with the mast drilled for a 5/16 pin for the headstay and 1/4 for the backstay

BUT the orginal headstay has a 3/8 eye and the backstay 5/16 ,I know the headstay is orginal because i know the orginal owner and it still has the foil feeder on the headstay from before they changed J24s to hanks


I figured at 28 years i was really pushing my luck and drilled the mast to 3/8 because the rigger i sent the parts to to be copyed had a stroke and they think they can make the new backstay in 1/4 or i wil drill it to 5/16 also


BUT it lived through 28 years of racing
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1981 J24 Tangent 2930
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If a dirty bottom slows you down what do you think it does to your boat
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  #20  
Old 03-25-2009
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I'll bet two cents that the mystery antenna was intended for a cell phone.

There are lots of folks who would say if the rigging is 20 years old, just replace it, don't waste your time inspecting it. And the radio coax cable, to replace after 5 years, ten at the outside, while you're pulling wires.

When you replace the anchor light, put silicon grease (aka light bulb grease, aks high temperature brake grease) into the socket to prevent corrosion while you are up there.

Any good machine shop should have a dye check kit available, which you can use to check the stainless fittings. Eyeballing them often is not good enough, the dye check kits use a dye plus a developer, and give you bright red dye filling in cracks that your naked eye would not see.

Hiring a pro can be a great way to save time--assuming you can find one that you are sure is a real pro, not just an alleged one.
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