Sculling sailboats? - Page 3 - SailNet Community

   Search Sailnet:

 forums  store  


Quick Menu
Forums           
Articles          
Galleries        
Boat Reviews  
Classifieds     
Search SailNet 
Boat Search (new)

Shop the
SailNet Store
Anchor Locker
Boatbuilding & Repair
Charts
Clothing
Electrical
Electronics
Engine
Hatches and Portlights
Interior And Galley
Maintenance
Marine Electronics
Navigation
Other Items
Plumbing and Pumps
Rigging
Safety
Sailing Hardware
Trailer & Watersports
Clearance Items

Advertise Here






Go Back   SailNet Community > On Board > Gear & Maintenance
 Not a Member? 
  #21  
Old 11-29-2010
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Sep 2009
Location: Kingston Washington
Posts: 506
Thanks: 0
Thanked 2 Times in 2 Posts
Rep Power: 5
Waltthesalt is on a distinguished road
I've sculled my 21 foot trailer sailer boat. On one trip I found I'd left the rudder home and used the scull oar as a repalcement. It worked. For my 29 ft Cal, I have 10 ft oars and can row it. They need to be at least that log to reach the water. I think the Pardeys just rowed with a single oar with thier first boat. worked fine and was a simple arrangement
Reply With Quote Share with Facebook
  #22  
Old 11-29-2010
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Oct 2009
Location: Gloucester, MA
Posts: 586
Thanks: 0
Thanked 0 Times in 0 Posts
Rep Power: 5
klem is on a distinguished road
While it is a very neat way to move a boat about for short distances, it is incredibly tiring to move a big boat at any speed or for any real distance. As Jeff mentioned, it can be hard on the wrists. The real advantage to me is that you can see where you are going and you can fit in between docks barely wider than your boat.

Personally, I prefer to row than to scull a boat. I can make the boat go much faster and it is much more pleasant. I leave sculling for the tight quarters maneuvering (be careful, some sculling setups make it hard to stop or go backwards while it is easy with others, it all depends on how much you can pivot the oar).
Reply With Quote Share with Facebook
  #23  
Old 11-29-2010
Member
 
Join Date: Nov 2010
Posts: 32
Thanks: 0
Thanked 1 Time in 1 Post
Rep Power: 0
patrickbryant is on a distinguished road
Quote:
Originally Posted by speciald View Post
Another way to do it is to fix the rudder amidships and rool the boat from side to side. It works on racing dinghys
I'll have to try that, but... only first in a very private setting. Given the amount of attention I got from other boaters by just moving the tiller back and forth to move along, I suspect that their seeing me running repeatedly back and forth across the deck from one beam to the other might get me locked up for psychiatric observation.

I've found sculling with the rudder to also be a good way to rescue my boat when she's caught in irons - while keeping the sailing pure of noisy smelly beasts with propellers.

Last edited by patrickbryant; 11-29-2010 at 09:03 PM.
Reply With Quote Share with Facebook
  #24  
Old 12-04-2010
Junior Member
 
Join Date: Nov 2010
Posts: 7
Thanks: 0
Thanked 0 Times in 0 Posts
Rep Power: 0
Tazsprout is on a distinguished road
Klem (or other rowers of smallish sailboats..)
How do you set up the boat for rowing? I can't quite work out what you do for oar locks or where one would sit. Can you explain?

I used to scull home all the time in my Beetle Cat... it had one of those huge barn door rudders.

Chris
Reply With Quote Share with Facebook
  #25  
Old 12-04-2010
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Oct 2009
Location: Gloucester, MA
Posts: 586
Thanks: 0
Thanked 0 Times in 0 Posts
Rep Power: 5
klem is on a distinguished road
How you set it up is really a function of the boat. The critical dimensions in it are the seat height, oarlock height, distance between oarlocks and oar length. Things like the fore and aft placement of the seat and oarlocks do matter but are not as important.

Usually the first thing to figure out is where you can put oarlocks. If you have a cockpit coaming, it is usually an easy place to bolt on a set. I have also seen people who make a standoff block that bolts through the deck and has an oarlock on it. For boats that don't plan to row a lot, you can wrap a line around the oar and the jib winches (assuming you have them) and it works okay.

Next, you need to figure out where you can sit. Usually a removable seat across the cockpit seats or on top of the centerboard trunk works best. If it isn't fastened down, this will allow you to play around with fore and aft position. The height is important and easiest to figure out sitting in the boat with the oars in the oarlocks. You want the oar handle to be somewhere around shoulder height with the blade just fully buried. If you always row in calm water, you can have it a bit lower but if you row in rough water, you need to keep it high so that the blades don't hit the waves on the recovery.

I hope that this helps.
Reply With Quote Share with Facebook
  #26  
Old 12-05-2010
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Nov 2008
Location: Long Island
Posts: 2,129
Thanks: 1
Thanked 0 Times in 0 Posts
Rep Power: 6
WanderingStar is on a distinguished road
Exactly.
Reply With Quote Share with Facebook
  #27  
Old 12-06-2010
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Dec 2009
Location: Long Beach CA
Posts: 235
Thanks: 0
Thanked 0 Times in 0 Posts
Rep Power: 5
COOL is on a distinguished road
Quote:
Originally Posted by patrickbryant View Post
Chalk up another advantage of tillers over wheels.
My Islander 30's large aft raked rudder makes
a perfect skulling 'paddle', I can easily maintain
over a knot of boatspeed, in a flat calm,
and often skull into the slip when the wind drops off.
Since the rudder can turn all the way around,
I can skull in reverse also , which is a handy
feature when sailing on to a mooring or
backing into a slip.
__________________
Islander 30 II 'COOL'
Reply With Quote Share with Facebook
  #28  
Old 07-01-2013
Andrew65's Avatar
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Dec 2009
Location: Oslo, Norway
Posts: 303
Thanks: 10
Thanked 12 Times in 12 Posts
Rep Power: 5
Andrew65 is on a distinguished road
Re: Sculling sailboats?

I have an engineless 8 ton 29ft gaffrigged cutter. I converted my 5 meter long sweep to a 6 meter long yuloh after learning it was better for my boat. It works like a charm. Anyone want to know the process, write me. It was a long research, but well worth it. Sweeps are good for lighter boats, and yulohs are better for heavier boats. Jeff H is right about it being hard on your wrists, after a few sessions, Popeye comes to mind. A well built and rigged yuloh is easy enough for a 15 year old to use.

Engineless sailing requires a different mindset. The rules of nature make you take on a whole new perspective towards it.
Reply With Quote Share with Facebook
Reply


Currently Active Users Viewing This Thread: 1 (0 members and 1 guests)
 
Thread Tools

 
Posting Rules
You may post new threads
You may post replies
You may post attachments
You may edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is On


Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
A List of ALL sailboats made with layouts? Myblueheaven Boat Review and Purchase Forum 8 10-08-2010 11:32 AM
Steel Sailboats - Opinions of Owners and Others stipakb Boat Review and Purchase Forum 4 01-21-2009 09:58 PM
9 hoisted from NC sailboats as winds hit hurricane force - Wilmington Morning Star NewsReader News Feeds 0 05-08-2007 07:15 AM
Coast Guard rescues 9 from storm-tossed sailboats off coast - KGAN NewsReader News Feeds 0 05-07-2007 08:15 PM
Coast Guard says sailboats in trouble off NC coast - Wilmington Morning Star NewsReader News Feeds 0 05-07-2007 11:15 AM


All times are GMT -4. The time now is 11:26 PM.

Add to My Yahoo!         
Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.7
Copyright ©2000 - 2014, vBulletin Solutions, Inc.
SEO by vBSEO 3.6.1
(c) Marine.com LLC 2000-2012

The SailNet.com store is owned and operated by a company independent of the SailNet.com forum. You are now leaving the SailNet forum. Click OK to continue or Cancel to return to the SailNet forum.