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Go Back   SailNet Community > On Board > Gear & Maintenance
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  #21  
Old 04-01-2009
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I'm just finishing up this project now:
Winterhawk Restoration

Using battens is great for the insulation and wiring. Home depot has been good to me so far. Keeping them of a manageable size is important. Making kefr cuts helps it bend.

One product I think could be neat, and cheap is the same material they make the political yard signs out of. Some sort of PVC material. It's super light weight and cheap and around $20 for a 4x8 sheet. They have it at our local lumber yards, not sure about home depot.

If I had more of a race boat I think I would have tried that. If it fails is some way, then I can use them as patterns for the new material and you're only out $80.
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Old 04-01-2009
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xort i do mean the pebble stuff, it is easy enough to clean at first but let it go a few times and it gets harder to get between the pebbles. go look in a few restaurants and you will see it gets harder to keep clean. but i do think formica would do well.

gerald you would not want to try the 3/8 stuff the cedar stuff is closer to 1/4 and the T and G gives it some easy curve. but once again compound curves are the hard part you would need to break up the ceiling in to straight sections
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scotty

I was thinking of putting the pebbly side facing the insulation so I would have the smooth side to clean. Looks like this confirms that I should

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Old 04-01-2009
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I would scuff up the shiny stuff on the glue side to help it adhere and clean it really well with wax, grease, and silicone remover to remove whatever mold release compound that they used. I'd probably hit it with 220 grit on an orbital sander, 180, 240, something like that.
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Old 04-01-2009
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Not sure I would use the formica or not. But sounds similar to my ceiling, but it was a vinyl glued and stapled to a 3/16" plywood.

When I redid my interior, where their was on the curved hull a foam backed vinyl, I did a similar option. On some places under the deck where there were deck fittings, and it was flat, I took some door paneling, bought at HD no less, and then used the same non foam back vinyl and contact cemented the finished side, with about an inch overlap to the back side, stapled, and then screwed up the panels. The screws I covered with a screw cap that come in about 4 colors IIRC from WM, a brown, black, white and a tan? or maybe it is just the three colors.

Probably a bit more expensive than the formica panels, but IMHO, probably a nicer finish. You can get a number of colors in vinyl.

A link to the how I did the aft cabin, and at the bottom is a link to the head area.
Headlining Replacement

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I used a polyurethane construction adhesive to glue up the firring strips. Then screwed tongue in groove vinyl panelling from Home Depot. Teak strips held them in place and covered the screws. I thought it looked very nautical.
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Old 04-01-2009
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New headliner

An owner of one of my sisterships recently upgraded their headliner using formica. It looks great. Perhaps you would consider that. See a photo of it here http://www.sailnet.com/photogallery/...0/ppuser/10031
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Old 04-01-2009
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I'd be afraid of panelling over furring strips on a boat. It isn't a house! The odds are that moisture will be trapped back there, and mold and mildew will follow, and then it will be almost impossible to access and clean without dismantling. Or, carefully designing it with ventilation in mind and then crossing your fingers.

I'd rather use a conventional mastic from a tub and bonding the panelling down with no place for mildew to grow. Or, white strips with no sheets bonded over them, similar to the traditional varnished or painted ones used on boats to ensure there's ventilation to the hull.
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Old 04-01-2009
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That job looks quite nice.
Quote:
Originally Posted by DwayneSpeer View Post
An owner of one of my sisterships recently upgraded their headliner using formica. It looks great. Perhaps you would consider that. See a photo of it here http://www.sailnet.com/photogallery/...0/ppuser/10031
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Old 04-02-2009
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FRP Panels

FRP panels are often used in coolers, commercial bathrooms and commercial kitchens. Call these guys D.W. Ross Company - Freezer, Cooler, Hardwoods, Windows, Doors and Much More. to see about getting frp prelaminated to plywood, foam core, or other substrates. The laminated panels are the way to go. These guys laminate their own panels. Ask for Danny. I have no connection with these guys other than I bought some FRP panels for another use once.
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