Re-routing rigging on an older boat - SailNet Community

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  #1  
Old 04-01-2009
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Re-routing rigging on an older boat

If you want to update the routing of halyards and controls lines on an older boat that just has swivel blocks attached with shackles to the mast base mount, feeding back through bullseyes, to cabin top winches and fixed or cam cleats...

What do you have to do to mount the following hardware so that it will handle the line loads without ripping out of the cabin top?
  • Deck Organizer Block Strips
  • Rope Clutch Banks

Is it as simple as just putting mounting plates under the new hardware inside the cabin? If so, is there any formula for how large the plates need to be? Is marine plywood or stainless the preferred material? And what's the best way to deal with a fixed headliner (or repair it afterward) that may be covering the location you need to reach?

And is there any specific method that needs to be used to calculate locations. Or can you just eyeball it?

Last edited by backcreeksailor; 04-01-2009 at 08:30 PM.
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Old 04-01-2009
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The headliner depending upon what type it is, can be a PITA< or real simple. Mine is a plywood with vinyl over it, remove a bunch of screws, and off it comes, along with removal of the wires to the overhead lights.

I used some REALLY big diam fender washers under the new clutch's, organizer blocks etc. The washers I used had probably 4 times area as the washers used by the manufacture. Where there was the issue with up forces, then there was ply wood backing. Otherwise, if horizontal in nature, just washers. Even my genoa tracks has washers only. About 1/2", if that in size. When I put new tracks on, I used 1.5" washers under.

I should point out, my roofing has about an inch of balsa core too.

Bulls eyes, frankly, just a long screw to hold them on. They do nothing more between the organizer and the clutch than keep the line off the deck.

I also used silicone? when putting in the new fasteners.

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Old 04-01-2009
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Quote:
Originally Posted by backcreeksailor View Post
If you want to update the routing of halyards and controls lines on an older boat that just has swivel blocks attached with shackles to the mast base mount, feeding back through bullseyes, to cabin top winches and fixed or cam cleats...

What do you have to do to mount the following hardware so that it will handle the line loads without ripping out of the cabin top?
  • Deck Organizer Block Strips
  • Rope Clutch Banks
Is it as simple as just putting mounting plates under the new hardware inside the cabin? If so, is there any formula for how large the plates need to be? Is marine plywood or stainless the preferred material?
Actually, fiberglass is probably the best material Wood rots, and stainless steel has a different expansion coefficient than does fiberglass, and is exceptionally hard to work with and would probably leave hard edges if the plates are not designed properly. If you use fiberglass or wood backing plates, you'll want to use the largest fender washers you can fit on the bolts as well. The bolts should be 316 stainless steel if you can find it, and the nuts should be nylon-lined lock nuts, to prevent them from loosening up.

If the deck is cored, you will need to pot the fastener holes properly by drilling the holes slightly oversized, inserting a tool to ream out the core surrounding the fastener hole and then filling the hole with thickened epoxy. Countersinking the top of the fastener holes a bit is also a very good idea, as it allows the sealant to form an "o-ring" and helps prevent leaks from occurring. Run the countersink bit in reverse to prevent the bit from taking too much material from the fastener hole.

Maine Sail has an excellent web page detailing this process located here.

Quote:
And what's the best way to deal with a fixed headliner (or repair it afterward) that may be covering the location you need to reach?
It really depends on the boat. Some have headliners that are removable, others will have to be modified to gain the access you'll need.

Quote:
And is there any specific method that needs to be used to calculate locations. Or can you just eyeball it?
The best way to figure out the locations is to mock them up by placing the line organizers and clutches on the actual deck, and running line through them to see if the lines lead fair.
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Last edited by sailingdog; 04-01-2009 at 09:11 PM.
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