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Go Back   SailNet Community > On Board > Gear & Maintenance
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  #11  
Old 04-05-2009
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I'm new to this bought-a-new-used-boat thing, but have had a blast starting with smaller projects, then working up. Now the priority is to have a safe boat to sail for our 3 short summer months in the PNW. And I'm getting tired, too. So I might put off the bottom work until November-if I don't enjoy some sailing over the summer when I can, I just might burn out on the whole thing-don't want that!
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Old 04-05-2009
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Sail when you can and work on the boat when you can. Messing around on a boat is better than just about anything else any way. The work you are doing is really enhancing the sailing so you gotta balance the 2 except when the work is for safety. When the work is getting me and I expect it gets everyone, I look at the value of the outcome vs the pleasure of the sail. The sail usually wins.
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  #13  
Old 04-06-2009
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I would never take out my boat if thought it was not safe. Well never say never I do push somethings to the limit, but thats not the case here. The work I still need to do is mostly cosmetic. It's kind of a cath 22 when I am working I feel I should be sailing and when I'm sailing then I feel guilty that I am not working. Guess I enjoy knowing other people have the same problem.
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Old 04-06-2009
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If you get too sick of working on your boat, call me I'll come pick it up and give it back when the projects are done. It might take me about 5 years or so but I'll work as fast as I can. Of course, I'll have to take it out for a test sail as often as need be to make sure that I'm doing the work right. Oh yeah, I work cheap. only a few bottles of rum. (a week)

Dave
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  #15  
Old 04-07-2009
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Quote:
Originally Posted by lapworth View Post
when I'm sailing then I feel guilty that I am not working.
Not me! I'd rather be sailing than sitting at the dock making the boat look pretty.
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Old 04-07-2009
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I've got to add my $0.02. I bought my boat last June and have been working on her (improving) ever since. Yes, I also feel the need to sail instead of work, and I am almost there.

Since last June I have added the following safety items: two new bilge pumps (primary and dewatering) with switches, hoses and wiring, MOB pole/flag, lazy jacks, all new running rigging, a forward hatch, re-ran all lines to cockpit, high water alarm, LED lighting throughout, telltales on sails, Garmin 545 GPS, and a ditch bag.

Non-safety items are: new head, insulation around cooler, port side flag (radar reflector) halyard, bow roller, Xantrex 40amp batt charger, new VHF radio, new stereo, rope clutches, deck organizers, BBQ, carpeting, water pump impeller and return line bypass, new bottom paint, new SS hand rails on cabin top, etc. etc., you get the idea.

Yes, I love working on her, but I am going to sail this summer and only fix what breaks (yeah, right).

Good luck, Bill
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Old 04-07-2009
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A number of years ago, I was looking for a used 21-24ft sailboat on a limited budget. At one yard, one of the owners, who professionally restores boats to like new conditions (also builds new boats) told me that I should not buy any boat that I couldn't go sailing with immediately (and he knew that I couldn't even think about buying one of his refurished boats on the permitted budget). He said that a project boat, that wasn't sailable would use up my money, and my limited time and eventually get to be a bothersome unending chore, since I couldn't achieve my purpose of actually going sailing. He said even a sailable boat, that had big unfinished projects that needed to be undertaken, would bug me and take away the satisfaction of even that level of sailing because the undone projects would always be hanging over my head.

All of us are different....some get more joy out of fixing up things than in actually using them...for those the above wouldn't apply. But for lots of us, especially including me, he had a valid point. It's something worth thinking about really well before undertaking a project boat. My observation is that there are sailable boats available for about the same price one pays for a project boat when the cost and time spent on upgrading it to sailable condition are added into the mix.
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Old 04-08-2009
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I sail when I want, and work on her when I want.... and sometimes I go down to the boat, pick up a book, lie down on a bunk and in no time at all I'm pushing the z's. She is my 'place' to escape to, she's my hobby, she's my pleasure.
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Old 04-08-2009
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I agree with mawm and working on the boat has helped me learn the inside and outs about boats and sailboats. Like I said I am new to sailing but construction is no problem because I am a contractor ( even figured out how to sew all new cushions). Right now I can't afford to buy a new boat, even if I could I wouldn't know what I wan't. Is it hard to sell a boat that you put alot of work into? This is my first boat and I am getting pretty attached and I don't like attachment, much less to something material.
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Old 04-08-2009
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Quote:
Originally Posted by mawm View Post
I sail when I want, and work on her when I want.... and sometimes I go down to the boat, pick up a book, lie down on a bunk and in no time at all I'm pushing the z's. She is my 'place' to escape to, she's my hobby, she's my pleasure.
Well said Mawn! This, to me, is what owning a sailboat is all about.

Even during the (all too short) summer season in Michigan, I still do some projects when I am at the boat but not able to sail because of time limitations, crew availability, uncooperative wind/weather, etc. Some get done, some don't. I doubt the project list will ever end, so enjoy it when you can. Owning a sailboat is a lifestyle for many of us, which includes the repair/upgrades, relaxing, as well as the sailing.
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