Galvanized Rigging - SailNet Community

   Search Sailnet:

 forums  store  


Quick Menu
Forums           
Articles          
Galleries        
Boat Reviews  
Classifieds     
Search SailNet 
Boat Search (new)

Shop the
SailNet Store
Anchor Locker
Boatbuilding & Repair
Charts
Clothing
Electrical
Electronics
Engine
Hatches and Portlights
Interior And Galley
Maintenance
Marine Electronics
Navigation
Other Items
Plumbing and Pumps
Rigging
Safety
Sailing Hardware
Trailer & Watersports
Clearance Items

Advertise Here






Go Back   SailNet Community > General Interest Forums > Gear & Maintenance
 Not a Member? 
  #1  
Old 04-12-2009
tager's Avatar
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Nov 2008
Posts: 991
Thanks: 0
Thanked 0 Times in 0 Posts
Rep Power: 6
tager is on a distinguished road
Galvanized Rigging

I plan to replace much of my standing rigging soon. I am relatively sure that the rig is original stainless from 1968. It is an Islander Bahama 24', a simple masthead sloop with an Aluminum alloy mast. ISLANDER BAHAMA 24 - SAILBOAT PORTAL (specs. English)
It is currently rigged the way you would expect an old masthead sloop to be: Stainless swaged terminals to bronze turnbuckles on stainless chainplates. Corrosion does not seem to be a big issue as of right now. Once upon a time this boat must have been sailed in the ocean (Originally from Hoquiam, WA), because there is an insulated backstay. I have no such plans, yet. I am going to do away with the insulated backstay, and do a straight run of galvanized. I am also planning on getting a new stainless headstay, as I use hanked on sails.

I am going to carefully inspect all of the fittings, and I already have spotted a few that really need to be replaced. Right now, I am trying to decide on something:

How should I terminate the wire?
Eyesplice?
Talurit Splice?
Nicopress?
Bulldog clamps and thimbles?
Professionally Swaged Terminals?
Quick-Attach, Norseman, Sta-lok etc?
WireVise ?

I know that an eyesplice is the most solid way to go, and perhaps most aesthetically pleasing (imho) but I want to use 1x19 galvanized wire because it has less constructional stretch. Would this be almost impossible to splice, even at the small diameter of my wire? I have heard it is not difficult to do the splicing, but that the size of thimble needed would be absurdly large. How large?

I have heard that nicopress and Talurit should not be used on standing rigging. The main argument being that they do not do well with 1x19, and that you would need 2 sets of swages to get good strength.

I am leaning towards bulldog clamps. Ugly, cheap, functional, reusable. Easy to service and easy to use. I have not heard an argument against them other than that they are ugly... (that's a weak argument)

Pro swaged terminals. Not too expensive if done in galvanized by an industrial rigger (like the company in Everett, WA that does all the tug-cables). Not serviceable! I want this rig to be easy to work on in case it fails at sea. Jury-riggability is key!

Norseman, sta-lok, suncor quick attach etc. These are all good. But kind of expensive, and would only apply to the headstay.

Has anyone seen a wirevise in use in a marine environment? It seems like a simple and extremely cheap way to terminate galvanized wire, especially 1x19. It simply lets wire go only one way through! These are widely used in agriculture, and reportedly retain 90% of wire strength. I am considering using these, though they seem untested. I do see them terminating guys for telephone poles.

I suppose, in short, I am asking for experience... I hard thing to get through an internet forum. Yet I think that I can learn something!

I have also considered lanyards, as an alternative to turnbuckles, routed direct through the eyes of the stays, and lashed... good idea or bad?

If you were to rig up my boat, in a seamanly way, and a cheap way, how would you do it?
Reply With Quote Share with Facebook
  #2  
Old 04-13-2009
tager's Avatar
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Nov 2008
Posts: 991
Thanks: 0
Thanked 0 Times in 0 Posts
Rep Power: 6
tager is on a distinguished road
Another thing: Poured sockets!

These are no longer done with molten zinc, usually they are bedded with an epoxy polymer! That sounds easy!
Reply With Quote Share with Facebook
  #3  
Old 04-13-2009
tager's Avatar
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Nov 2008
Posts: 991
Thanks: 0
Thanked 0 Times in 0 Posts
Rep Power: 6
tager is on a distinguished road
Poured sockets retain 100% of the breaking strength of the rope. Damn good.
Reply With Quote Share with Facebook
  #4  
Old 04-13-2009
sailingdog's Avatar
Telstar 28
 
Join Date: Mar 2006
Location: New England
Posts: 43,291
Thanks: 0
Thanked 8 Times in 8 Posts
Rep Power: 13
sailingdog is just really nice sailingdog is just really nice sailingdog is just really nice sailingdog is just really nice sailingdog is just really nice
Just curious, why are you going with galvanized wire for the backstay?
__________________
Sailingdog

To view links or images in signatures your post count must be 10 or greater. You currently have 0 posts.

Telstar 28
New England

You know what the first rule of sailing is? ...Love. You can learn all the math in the 'verse, but you take
a boat to the sea you don't love, she'll shake you off just as sure as the turning of the worlds. Love keeps
her going when she oughta fall down, tells you she's hurting 'fore she keens. Makes her a home.

—Cpt. Mal Reynolds, Serenity (edited)

If you're new to the Sailnet Forums... please read this
To view links or images in signatures your post count must be 10 or greater. You currently have 0 posts.
.

Still—DON'T READ THAT POST AGAIN.
Reply With Quote Share with Facebook
  #5  
Old 04-13-2009
tager's Avatar
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Nov 2008
Posts: 991
Thanks: 0
Thanked 0 Times in 0 Posts
Rep Power: 6
tager is on a distinguished road
Galvanized is cheaper, initial cost is lower, and it lasts longer... in my book that makes it superior. Ignore the problem that it requires annual maintenance, and there is no reason to go stainless!
Reply With Quote Share with Facebook
  #6  
Old 04-13-2009
zz4gta's Avatar
I don't discuss my member
 
Join Date: Aug 2007
Location: Chesapeake Bay
Posts: 2,396
Thanks: 0
Thanked 15 Times in 15 Posts
Rep Power: 7
zz4gta is on a distinguished road
Are you in salt water?
__________________
Merit 25 # 764 "Audrey"
Reply With Quote Share with Facebook
  #7  
Old 04-13-2009
tager's Avatar
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Nov 2008
Posts: 991
Thanks: 0
Thanked 0 Times in 0 Posts
Rep Power: 6
tager is on a distinguished road
No. I live aboard in Lake Union. I will be cruising Puget Sound this summer, but I have a one year lease here on the lake.
Reply With Quote Share with Facebook
  #8  
Old 04-21-2009
tommays's Avatar
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Sep 2008
Posts: 4,041
Thanks: 1
Thanked 13 Times in 13 Posts
Rep Power: 6
tommays will become famous soon enough
Its clearly a bad idea to go with what lasted 40 years ?
__________________
1970 Cal 29 Sea Fever

To view links or images in signatures your post count must be 10 or greater. You currently have 0 posts.

1981 J24 Tangent 2930
Tommays
Northport NY


If a dirty bottom slows you down what do you think it does to your boat
To view links or images in signatures your post count must be 10 or greater. You currently have 0 posts.
Reply With Quote Share with Facebook
  #9  
Old 04-21-2009
tager's Avatar
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Nov 2008
Posts: 991
Thanks: 0
Thanked 0 Times in 0 Posts
Rep Power: 6
tager is on a distinguished road
I went with galvanized, and bought a $45 quart of paint. It is cold-galvanize. It is 97% zinc, with an epoxy base. I have heard good things, and dang it is the heaviest quart of paint ever!
Reply With Quote Share with Facebook
  #10  
Old 04-22-2009
tommays's Avatar
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Sep 2008
Posts: 4,041
Thanks: 1
Thanked 13 Times in 13 Posts
Rep Power: 6
tommays will become famous soon enough
I still dont get it the SS wire is the cheep part of the deal IF your buying SS fittings to use with the galvanized
__________________
1970 Cal 29 Sea Fever

To view links or images in signatures your post count must be 10 or greater. You currently have 0 posts.

1981 J24 Tangent 2930
Tommays
Northport NY


If a dirty bottom slows you down what do you think it does to your boat
To view links or images in signatures your post count must be 10 or greater. You currently have 0 posts.
Reply With Quote Share with Facebook
Reply


Currently Active Users Viewing This Thread: 1 (0 members and 1 guests)
 
Thread Tools

 
Posting Rules
You may post new threads
You may post replies
You may post attachments
You may edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is On


Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
Galvanized vs. Stainless Rigging cruiserdave Gear & Maintenance 26 02-24-2010 04:25 PM
Rigging repair at-sea Lin & Larry Pardey Gear and Maintenance Articles 1 02-16-2008 12:28 PM
Standing Rigging Basics Mark Matthews Racing Articles 0 08-29-2004 08:00 PM
Replacing Your Standing Rigging Mark Matthews Gear and Maintenance Articles 0 12-15-2002 07:00 PM
Standing Rigging Storage Jerry Hammill Gear and Maintenance Articles 0 10-15-2001 08:00 PM


All times are GMT -4. The time now is 01:12 PM.

Add to My Yahoo!         
Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.7
Copyright ©2000 - 2014, vBulletin Solutions, Inc.
SEO by vBSEO 3.6.1
(c) Marine.com LLC 2000-2012