Permanent Dock Lines, Tie Up Procecures, & Electrolysis - Page 2 - SailNet Community

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Go Back   SailNet Community > On Board > Gear & Maintenance
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  #11  
Old 04-16-2009
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How heavy is your boat...

A good general rule of thumb is that your cleats should be 16x the diameter of your docklines in order to be able to handle two lines on each cleat. For instance, I use 5/8" lines for my anchor line, so I have 10" cleats at the bow. I use 1/2" lines elsewhere, so I have 8" cleats on the rail and on the transom.

However, one project this spring is to add more cleats to my boat, since the cleats are all on the primary hull and it makes it a PITA to tie off when the boat has the amas out. I'm adding cleats to both amas...

Quote:
Originally Posted by backcreeksailor View Post
If I only have 2 aft cleats and 2 forward cleats, can I use my primaries as anchors for both the fore and aft spring lines? Or to they HAVE to be cleated off at the fore and aft cleats too to make them functional?

And I was planning on using 1/2" dock lines for both summer and winter as permanent lines. And probably the same for my transient set. Is that adequate?
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Last edited by sailingdog; 04-16-2009 at 04:56 PM.
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  #12  
Old 04-16-2009
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Backcreek, if you only have 4 cleats you could run the spring lines from the mid ship pilings back to the stern cleats. That's providing the cleats are large enough to handle both sets of your 1/2" lines. That would be 2 lines forward, two at the stern and two for spring lines running from the mid pilings back. If you back in, as planned, the stern lines will keep you from getting pushed out into the fairway. The spring lines should be set so they keep you from being pushed aft into the dock. I've used the same set up for years with both a 31' and 36' with zero issues. Both weathered the severe storms that crop up on the bay delivering 40-50kt winds. If a tropical storm is tracking your way you can double up on the lines. Again that's providing your cleats can handle two sets. Check with other boats at your marina. I think you'll get to see what is the standard for your area.
Mike
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  #13  
Old 04-16-2009
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Don't try to use the ty-up lines when you travel.

Docking in an oversized slip is a pain as it is. Get a travel set too. They will last a long time.

Lines don't fail, they chafe. Cover all chafe points with tubular webbing. It is better than hose. Cheap from REI or other climbing stores.

Springlines really help cut down on surging, and they make it possible to keep the boat closer to the dock SAFELY. My wife has arthritis, and so that is a big factor.

Catamarans are always in over-length slips, so I feel your pain. Rig 2 lines, from the outer pilings to the inners, as guides. BIG help in a cross wind, when the bow pilings seem SO far away while you are getting the stern pilings tied. there is simply no good way to control the situation short of single handed. Don't worry if they look uncool. Scratched gel coat and bashed docks are uncool.

Best tip. Spend several nights on the boat, evaluating how she lies as the tide and wind change. It can be both relaxing and informative.

Don't figure you will get it right the first try. That would make you a god. I like to set it up so that when I get in, all I have to do is drop loops through then over cleats, but getting ALL of the lengths right takes time.

Finally, getting under a dock on a low tide is worse than touching a piling. I've seen the aftermath.
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Old 04-16-2009
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We move around a lot fulltime cruising and we do best adapting to any situation with eight dock lines on my 41' boat. Four the length of the boat and four half the boat length. 'take care and joy, Aythya crew
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One thing that really helps is having an amidships cleat. Mine is a Schaefer rail-mounted cleat... and it is very useful.
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Old 04-16-2009
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Good Advice!

I appreciate having the longer lines for traveling. We visited Rockport last year and nearly had to overnight at the main dock. The tide was out and we must have been around 10 feet below. We ultimately chose a nearby anchorage but I was hustling for a bit looking for long lines. So I've got them now.
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Yes, I have used mooring lines for dock lines more than once!

Quote:
Originally Posted by Joesaila View Post
I appreciate having the longer lines for traveling. We visited Rockport last year and nearly had to overnight at the main dock. The tide was out and we must have been around 10 feet below. We ultimately chose a nearby anchorage but I was hustling for a bit looking for long lines. So I've got them now.
It is inconvenient, but you probably have 2-3 150-300 foot lines there when you need them... unless you use all chain, then you have 1 less.

My first cat I used 4 lines, no springs and it was fine. My new cat I use 4 lines and 2 springs (outers, but not inners). Experiment. It all depends on weight, surge, and protection from wind and wave.
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  #18  
Old 04-16-2009
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Nobody really touched on this, but is there any reason why I couldn't or shouldn't use my primary winches in place of using amidships cleats for springlines? (I know someone that does this on a 34' J105 just down the creek from me that has no amidships cleats either and it seemed to work ok for his boat).

BTW... The PO did leave a couple Schaefer nylon rail-mounted cleats attached to stanchions. But I don't think I'd want an 8000 lb displacement boat pulling on one of my stanchions or my railing via one of those things. So I think I'll just keep those for fender hangers.

Last edited by backcreeksailor; 04-16-2009 at 11:00 PM.
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Old 04-16-2009
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I used the sheet winches for spring lines on my first boat a 23'er. Never had any issues with it.
Mike
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Old 04-17-2009
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dock lines

Backcreek,
I have read that if you use the winches you should make sure that the lines enter the winches at the same angle they are normally used (within reason). They are designed and mounted to handle forces in that plane and direction.

I also have only fore and aft cleats, I have a 35' sailboat at a 40' dock with 3 inside and outside pillings. I use 8 lines. I run criscrossed bow and stern lines from the outer pillings. I started with 1/2" lines, but they looked funny (too thin), so I replaced all my lines with 5/8" (3/4 was too big to put two lines on each cleat). I use chaffing protection on the bow and stern lines, but not on spring as they mostly hang off the boat. I run my aft going spring lines to the forward pillings. These are the longest lines and have the most stretch, so the boat can move further into the dock area. For me that is not an issue as I have a swing keel and with it up I only draw less than 2'. I run my fwd spring lines from the mid pillings to the bow cleats. This gives me extra line there and when I leave I set the ends of these lines on the forward pillings. Then when I back in I can pick up these lines and walk the boat back into the slip. Also, the aft going spring lines lay on top of these spring lines (which are shorter) and keeps them out of the water when slack.

I am also new to this as this is my first boat and first year with it, so I don't have a lot of experience, but the boat has sat well for the last 6 months. The lines are set so that the boat can come to within about 8" of the dock or the pillings, but never touch them. I add an extra line from a midships eye on a slider track to a center pilling. I use this to pull and tie the boat closer to the dock for getting on and off.

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