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  #1  
Old 05-05-2009
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Marine Toolkit

My father just purchases a used 1980 CAL 25. Since he lives out of state, it's my job to commission, and deliver the new boat to a slip that we have in the San Juan Islands (about 50nm away). I've gone through the normal checklist, but one thing that stuck out in my mind was tools and spares.

What is an acceptable toolkit (not just for the delivery, but for everyday use) for a small(ish) sailboat?

Along the same line... what is an acceptable list of common spares and useful things to have on board?

I'd love to hear from the experienced SailNet'rs on what tools they consider a must and what tools they wish they had had when XXX broke on that trip to XXX

Thanks!
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Last edited by WhatTheFoley; 05-05-2009 at 05:35 PM.
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Old 05-05-2009
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Take a look around the boat. Is it an engine with metric sizes, or standard? You can get one of those convenient tools boxes from Home Depot, sears, etc, etc. Then there are the usual hammers, hacksaw, punches, chisel, screwdrivers, pliers, and vice grips. Most of everything needed comes in those little suitcase carrying tool boxes.

On Frolic I added as needed, and took away when I dound no real use for a tool. Everything was in a hand carrying plastic case.....i2f
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  #3  
Old 05-05-2009
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A fairly complete tool kit would include:

Mechanics tools like:

A Craftsman mechanics set,—this includes both metric and imperial, since I've found on my boat there is a mix... the outboards use metric, the rest of the boat is pretty much imperial
Several assorted visegrips
Several assorted screwdrivers, including torx, allen, flat and phillips blades
A large set of channel locks
A pipe wrench
A hacksaw
Some chisels—wood and metal,
A few drift punches
A small sledge,
A ball peen hammer,
A few assorted files and rasps
A set of calipers
A tape measure
A strap wrench
An oil filter wrench

Electrical kit that includes:

A multimeter,
An electrical terminal crimping tool,
A butane torch for heat shrink terminals
Assorted heat shrink terminals
Some assorted wire in red and yellow, 12 AWG is a very useful size.
Electrical tape, a good brand, like 3M
Spare fuses for any carried aboard

A rigging kit that contains:


Spare clevis pins, cotter rings and cotter pins
Some small line, say 1/8-1/4" for various repairs, lashings, messenger lines, etc.
A sailmaker's palm
Spare sailcloth
Sail repair tape
Sailmaker's needles
Sail repair thread
Some stainless steel rings
Whipping twine
Beeswax
A couple of spare blocks of the most common kind used on your boat
A bosun's chair
A good awl

A repair kit that contains:

3M 5200 Fast Cure
3M 4000 UV
Lanocote
Loctite (both red and blue)
Some epoxy putty that sets underwater. Progressive Epoxy Polymers has some really good stuff.
Boeshield T9
McLube SailKote
Some regular epoxy resin and hardener
PBlaster
Heavy waterproof bearing grease
Some fiberglass cloth
Some colloidial fumed silica (Cabo-sil) for thickening the epoxy
Some disposable gloves—nitrile preferably
Respirator mask
Some mixing supplies—cups, containers, sticks, etc.
Acetone
Denatured Alcohol
Teflon Tape
Plumber's Putty
A roll of butyl tape
Rescue tape or some other self-fusing silicone tape
A roll of duct tape

Spares

Spark plugs for your outboard motors
Fuel and oil filters
Impellers for the various pumps aboard
An assortment of stainless steel screws, nuts and washers
Shear pin for outboard motor
Props for outboard motors, or spare blades if using a modular composite prop like a Pirahna

Miscellaneous Tools I've found very useful:

A pocket multitool, like the Leatherman Core or Surge
A cordless toolset including a drill, a sawzall, a jigsaw and a circular saw is often very useful
Battery lug crimping tool
Several flashlights, including a headlamp
A dremel rotary tool is often useful
A set of taps and dies
A pop rivet tool with aluminum and stainless steel rivets up to 3/16" in diameter
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You know what the first rule of sailing is? ...Love. You can learn all the math in the 'verse, but you take
a boat to the sea you don't love, she'll shake you off just as sure as the turning of the worlds. Love keeps
her going when she oughta fall down, tells you she's hurting 'fore she keens. Makes her a home.

—Cpt. Mal Reynolds, Serenity (edited)

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Last edited by sailingdog; 05-05-2009 at 02:15 PM.
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Old 05-05-2009
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Since this has most likely an outboard on it, make sure you have a plug wrench that actually fits the plugs used. While a craftsman kit is fine, my Honda 7.5 OB uses an 18mm deep socket to reach the plugs and the 2 standard sizes don't/won't work in a pinch and there isn't enough room for a wrench.
I'd also throw in a Awl, or ice pick. They work wonderful for lining up parts and lots of other uses.

Kary
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Old 05-05-2009
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Quote:
Originally Posted by sailingdog View Post
A fairly complete tool kit would include:

Mechanics tools like:

A Craftsman mechanics set,—this includes both metric and imperial, since I've found on my boat there is a mix... the outboards use metric, the rest of the boat is pretty much imperial
Several assorted visegrips
Several assorted screwdrivers, including torx, allen, flat and phillips blades
A large set of channel locks
A pipe wrench
A hacksaw
Some chisels—wood and metal,
A few drift punches
A small sledge,
A ball peen hammer,
A few assorted files and rasps
A set of calipers
A tape measure
A strap wrench
An oil filter wrench

Electrical kit that includes:

A multimeter,
An electrical terminal crimping tool,
A butane torch for heat shrink terminals
Assorted heat shrink terminals
Some assorted wire in red and yellow, 12 AWG is a very useful size.
Electrical tape, a good brand, like 3M
Spare fuses for any carried aboard

A rigging kit that contains:


Spare clevis pins, cotter rings and cotter pins
Some small line, say 1/8-1/4" for various repairs, lashings, messenger lines, etc.
A sailmaker's palm
Spare sailcloth
Sail repair tape
Sailmaker's needles
Sail repair thread
Some stainless steel rings
Whipping twine
Beeswax
A couple of spare blocks of the most common kind used on your boat
A bosun's chair
A good awl

A repair kit that contains:

3M 5200 Fast Cure
3M 4000 UV
Lanocote
Loctite (both red and blue)
Some epoxy putty that sets underwater. Progressive Epoxy Polymers has some really good stuff.
Boeshield T9
McLube SailKote
Some regular epoxy resin and hardener
PBlaster
Heavy waterproof bearing grease
Some fiberglass cloth
Some colloidial fumed silica (Cabo-sil) for thickening the epoxy
Some disposable gloves—nitrile preferably
Respirator mask
Some mixing supplies—cups, containers, sticks, etc.
Acetone
Denatured Alcohol
Teflon Tape
Plumber's Putty
A roll of butyl tape
Rescue tape or some other self-fusing silicone tape
A roll of duct tape

Spares

Spark plugs for your outboard motors
Fuel and oil filters
Impellers for the various pumps aboard
An assortment of stainless steel screws, nuts and washers
Shear pin for outboard motor
Props for outboard motors, or spare blades if using a modular composite prop like a Pirahna

Miscellaneous Tools I've found very useful:

A pocket multitool, like the Leatherman Core or Surge
A cordless toolset including a drill, a sawzall, a jigsaw and a circular saw is often very useful
Battery lug crimping tool
Several flashlights, including a headlamp
A dremel rotary tool is often useful
A set of taps and dies
A pop rivet tool with aluminum and stainless steel rivets up to 3/16" in diameter


Dog you really got all that stuff on your boat all the time
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1981 J24 Tangent 2930
Tommays
Northport NY


If a dirty bottom slows you down what do you think it does to your boat
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Old 05-05-2009
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Wow nice list SailDog!!!

I also like the idea of "Add as you Go"... Thanks imagine2frolic!

And thanks for the heads up on having a specific wrench for the outboard. I dont have much expirience with outboards so that is very helpful!
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Old 05-05-2009
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My boat's a lot bigger than a J24.... and yes... usually, most of that is aboard. I've fixed a lot of problems for people in various anchorages... and gotten some nice dinners out of it.

As you might have guessed, I was a boy scout a long time ago...and the be prepared part stuck with me...

Quote:
Originally Posted by tommays View Post
Dog you really got all that stuff on your boat all the time
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Telstar 28
New England

You know what the first rule of sailing is? ...Love. You can learn all the math in the 'verse, but you take
a boat to the sea you don't love, she'll shake you off just as sure as the turning of the worlds. Love keeps
her going when she oughta fall down, tells you she's hurting 'fore she keens. Makes her a home.

—Cpt. Mal Reynolds, Serenity (edited)

If you're new to the Sailnet Forums... please read this
To view links or images in signatures your post count must be 10 or greater. You currently have 0 posts.
.

Still—DON'T READ THAT POST AGAIN.

Last edited by sailingdog; 05-05-2009 at 02:58 PM.
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Old 05-05-2009
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This list thread made me laugh. When I was a kid on my dad's 16' Thompson run-about, his toolkit consisted of:

large Crescent wrench
big ball pien hammer
channel locks
side cutters
both kinds of screw drivers (medium)
spark plug socket and ratchet
a couple shear pins, cotter pins and a castle nut
...and there was always a can of ether or carb cleaner wedged behind something.

You could just about wrap everything up in a regular shop towel.

I can remember him smacking that old Evinrude with the hammer a few times.
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Old 05-05-2009
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Your dad's boat probably didn't have an electrical system with inverter, refrigerator, head with plumbing, galley with plumbing, or the electronics found on most of the sailboats today. To add to the complexity of a sailboat, my boat also has a fairly hefty ama folding system and mast-raising system that most boats don't have to deal with.


Quote:
Originally Posted by resdog View Post
This list thread made me laugh. When I was a kid on my dad's 16' Thompson run-about, his toolkit consisted of:

large Crescent wrench
big ball pien hammer
channel locks
side cutters
both kinds of screw drivers (medium)
spark plug socket and ratchet
a couple shear pins, cotter pins and a castle nut
...and there was always a can of ether or carb cleaner wedged behind something.

You could just about wrap everything up in a regular shop towel.

I can remember him smacking that old Evinrude with the hammer a few times.
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Telstar 28
New England

You know what the first rule of sailing is? ...Love. You can learn all the math in the 'verse, but you take
a boat to the sea you don't love, she'll shake you off just as sure as the turning of the worlds. Love keeps
her going when she oughta fall down, tells you she's hurting 'fore she keens. Makes her a home.

—Cpt. Mal Reynolds, Serenity (edited)

If you're new to the Sailnet Forums... please read this
To view links or images in signatures your post count must be 10 or greater. You currently have 0 posts.
.

Still—DON'T READ THAT POST AGAIN.
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  #10  
Old 05-05-2009
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Quote:
Originally Posted by resdog View Post
This list thread made me laugh.
I knew when I read the OP SD would come up with a list a mile long, it was while reading his list that I started laughing, not cause it was a mile long, it was because I'm only short a few ( handful at best ) items on that list and most of them is in the repair kit section

Amazing how this stuff just grows
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Cut off from the land that bore us, betrayed by the land we find, where the brightest have gone before us and the dullest remain behind, .......but stand to your glasses, steady,.......tis all we have left to prize, raise a cup to the dead already, hurrah for the next that dies
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