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cnc33voodoo 05-06-2009 11:31 PM

Best value furling
 
This month I will be dropping my mast to have some deck work done and While its out I have been thinking of replacing my furling unit.
I have an old school hyde streamstay one furling unit.
I replaced all the bearings/retaining nuts on it last season and it works well.
My concern is that this is a 30 year old unit and it also serves as my forestay.
I am concerned on how strong this thing still is and dont even want to think about what the end results will be if it lets go under sail.
Me and my wife plan to do some extended cruising this summer and im trying to take all precautions to make sure the boat is safe.
I have been looking at different units from a bang for buck standpoint and would like some advise.
I was leaning towards this unit as it would suit my needs and the price isnt too bad:
Harken: Cruising Furler
but then I have seen these CDI furling units and the price is even better but I know nothing about them.
I dont want to buy junk just because its cheap but due to the other repairs on the boat my budget is limited.
Any thoughts/advise?

sailingdog 05-07-2009 06:39 AM

I'd avoid the CDI furlers, as Harken or Furlex make a far better unit IMHO. The CDI furlers use an integrated halyard, and that can make adjusting the headsail luff tension difficult. They also have other problems, like coming apart in high-load situations... that are less than desirable.

drynoc 05-07-2009 07:55 AM

Alado
 
Simple, inexpensive, easy to install yourself. That's it. End of discussion. Time to close this thread.

patrickrea 05-07-2009 08:11 AM

I was also going to say the Alado. I have a CDI that I can't get parts for anymore and it's time to kill it off.

JomsViking 05-07-2009 08:19 AM

I never heard of the Alado, but if you want to go the "less expensive" route, Plastimo also makes some low cost furling systems, that are OK. Depending on how much it is going to be used, I'd still go for more expensive furlers as those discussed herein

jimq26 05-07-2009 08:46 AM

I'm very happy with my CDI
 
So were 100% of the other people who bought CDI according to a survey by Practical Sailor. Parts are readily available, service is excellent, and product is very functional and well designed.
Read about it and decide - CDI - Flexible Furlers

svHyLyte 05-07-2009 08:49 AM

Based on our experience with 3 different furling systems, I'd say go with the Harken. It's about as reliable as you're going to find. the Company always stands behind their products in the unlikely event you do have problems, and the units seem to continue to work no matter how much they are abused or mistreated (tho' I reccomend neither).

FWIW...

DrB 05-07-2009 09:08 AM

I have a Schaefer
 
and it has been pretty good to me and the PO. It has ceramic bearings, a simple design, and it has never jammed. Maintenance is a simple as an occasional fresh water rinse of the bearings.

My cousin had either a Furlex or Profurl, Furlex I think, on his previous boat and he said it always jammed and eventually broken. He ended up replacing it with a Harken.

DrB

deniseO30 05-07-2009 09:19 AM

I can't afford even a cdi just now, but from what I see in all furlers other then the continuous types with large sheaves is the effort required because of the small spool the line goes around. larger spool = less effort (imho) I had a cdi on my hunter 23 it was great. many people I know have cdi also and love it... but they are not blue water sailing.

gc1111 05-07-2009 09:35 AM

I also have a Streamstay dating from 1972. I talked to the local guru a while back and he said that as long as you keep the bearings in good shape (i.e. well lubed and no water in the fittings) and don't kink the furler taking it up and down, that it is good forever. The aluminium rod is much stronger than any replacement. A potential problem is that the rod hardens as it ages and loses some flexibility. But the only time that is an issue is taking it down or putting it back up.

But then again I have this bias "Old is better than new"


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