First Fiberglass Project - SailNet Community

   Search Sailnet:

 forums  store  


Quick Menu
Forums           
Articles          
Galleries        
Boat Reviews  
Classifieds     
Search SailNet 
Boat Search (new)

Shop the
SailNet Store
Anchor Locker
Boatbuilding & Repair
Charts
Clothing
Electrical
Electronics
Engine
Hatches and Portlights
Interior And Galley
Maintenance
Marine Electronics
Navigation
Other Items
Plumbing and Pumps
Rigging
Safety
Sailing Hardware
Trailer & Watersports
Clearance Items

Advertise Here






Go Back   SailNet Community > On Board > Gear & Maintenance
 Not a Member? 
  #1  
Old 05-11-2009
Snboard976's Avatar
S/V Sabbatical
 
Join Date: Aug 2008
Posts: 111
Thanks: 0
Thanked 0 Times in 0 Posts
Rep Power: 7
Snboard976 is on a distinguished road
First Fiberglass Project

I have a Pearson 365 Ketch and I need to expand my current battery box. My idea for a new battery box looks like a partial bulkhead with steps cut into it. I will tab two partial bulkheads to the hull and build shelves for the batteries between the two bulkheads. The end product will look like a staircase. Batteries 1 and 2 will go on the lowest step. Battery 3 will go on the second step in line with the first two and battery 4 will go on step two, but aft of battery 3.

My question is how should I tab the bulkheads to the hull? Should the plywood fit snuggly against the hull? I have heard that I should leave a gap so there are no pressure points against the hull. If I do need to leave a gap, how big should the gap be and how do I hold the box in the correct position while I am tabbing? Is there a filler I should apply to the bottom of the partial bulkheads before I tab them? Any ideas, tips or advice would be appreciated. Thank You.
Reply With Quote Share with Facebook
  #2  
Old 05-24-2009
Here .. Pull this
 
Join Date: Jan 2007
Posts: 2,031
Thanks: 0
Thanked 0 Times in 0 Posts
Rep Power: 8
Sailormann will become famous soon enough
Get some airex or corecell to use as a spacer between the hull and the framing piece. Cut cardboard and tape it in place to hold the piece while you are tabbing.

Good luck !
Reply With Quote Share with Facebook
  #3  
Old 05-25-2009
Valiente's Avatar
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Jun 2006
Location: Toronto
Posts: 5,491
Thanks: 0
Thanked 0 Times in 0 Posts
Rep Power: 10
Valiente has a spectacular aura about Valiente has a spectacular aura about
I can't tell from your sketch, but I would hesitate to in any way restrict access to a seacock. Envision needing to reach under those steps to turn off the seacock, to change a hose, to tighten a clamp or, Neptune forbid, to jam in the wooden plug I know you have conscientiously tied to the seacock with string...

Also, while I'm all for short cabling runs, isn't having four batteries on the same side going to throw out your trim? Can you not put Batteries 3 and 4 on the opposite side, nice and low, and perhaps relocate your water heater? Just some thoughts, as batteries are best kept low and not, in my view, stacked.
__________________
Can't sleep? Read my countdown to voyaging blog @
To view links or images in signatures your post count must be 10 or greater. You currently have 0 posts.
Reply With Quote Share with Facebook
  #4  
Old 05-25-2009
sailingdog's Avatar
Telstar 28
 
Join Date: Mar 2006
Location: New England
Posts: 43,291
Thanks: 0
Thanked 11 Times in 11 Posts
Rep Power: 13
sailingdog is just really nice sailingdog is just really nice sailingdog is just really nice sailingdog is just really nice sailingdog is just really nice
A few points...

First, i would agree that you should probably split the batteries port and starboard, as Valiente suggests, to keep the boat better balanced.

Second, I'd hesitate to block access to a seacock, since, in an emergency, you may need fairly decent access to plug it.

Third, adding a box to the hull only on one side may cause problems... generally, you should try and modify the hull in a somewhat symmetrical fashion, so that the hull doesn't have uneven loads on it.

Fourth, to keep the plywood from touching the hull, cut some foam, either Airex or Divinylcell, in a trapezoidal shape, and use it to hold the plywood in place. The trapezoidal shape will help you create a strong fillet joint and not bend the fiberglass too tightly—which would result in damaging the glass fibers.
__________________
Sailingdog

To view links or images in signatures your post count must be 10 or greater. You currently have 0 posts.

Telstar 28
New England

You know what the first rule of sailing is? ...Love. You can learn all the math in the 'verse, but you take
a boat to the sea you don't love, she'll shake you off just as sure as the turning of the worlds. Love keeps
her going when she oughta fall down, tells you she's hurting 'fore she keens. Makes her a home.

—Cpt. Mal Reynolds, Serenity (edited)

If you're new to the Sailnet Forums... please read this
To view links or images in signatures your post count must be 10 or greater. You currently have 0 posts.
.

Still—DON'T READ THAT POST AGAIN.
Reply With Quote Share with Facebook
  #5  
Old 05-25-2009
Valiente's Avatar
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Jun 2006
Location: Toronto
Posts: 5,491
Thanks: 0
Thanked 0 Times in 0 Posts
Rep Power: 10
Valiente has a spectacular aura about Valiente has a spectacular aura about
The foam stand-off is a good suggestion to avoid hard spots, SD. Don Casey's book on deck and hull repair, plus the West System booklet on basic fibreglassing, are going to be helpful here.

Also keep in mind that a "to code" battery installation is going to secure not the batteries, but the boxes in which they reside, usually with webbing tie-downs and either a belt-bucket or clasp sort of band. The lids go on the boxes, and the boxes are strapped to the platform (which benefit from some sort or lip or bits of 1 x 1 to keep them from moving). The straps are usually either run through slots in the glass or riveted through the glass.
__________________
Can't sleep? Read my countdown to voyaging blog @
To view links or images in signatures your post count must be 10 or greater. You currently have 0 posts.
Reply With Quote Share with Facebook
Reply


Currently Active Users Viewing This Thread: 1 (0 members and 1 guests)
 
Thread Tools

 
Posting Rules
You may post new threads
You may post replies
You may post attachments
You may edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is On


Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
The legacy of Philip Rhodes GoodOldBoat Good Old Boat 25 12-14-2012 07:34 PM
Theory on cause of Fiberglass Hull Blisters travistowle Gear & Maintenance 119 10-31-2011 08:59 AM
High Tech vs traditional-Comments? Pangaea General Discussion (sailing related) 38 08-07-2007 01:07 AM
First Fiberglass Repair SailNet Gear and Maintenance Articles 0 09-01-2001 08:00 PM


All times are GMT -4. The time now is 10:46 PM.

Add to My Yahoo!         
Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.7
Copyright ©2000 - 2014, vBulletin Solutions, Inc.
SEO by vBSEO 3.6.1
(c) Marine.com LLC 2000-2012

The SailNet.com store is owned and operated by a company independent of the SailNet.com forum. You are now leaving the SailNet forum. Click OK to continue or Cancel to return to the SailNet forum.