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  #1  
Old 05-11-2009
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Why Teak?

Other then the "traditional" thing, why is most or all of the wood work on sailing boats usually teak?
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Old 05-11-2009
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Quote:
Originally Posted by philo13 View Post
Other then the "traditional" thing, why is most or all of the wood work on sailing boats usually teak?
Because it is extremely rot resistant and therefor highly suitable to the marine environment. At least, as far as exterior wood goes.

Teak is used on interiors as well, but you also see lots of other woods. Cherry is a nice choice.
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Old 05-11-2009
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As well as being a "hard" wood (like mahogany and many other woods), teak has a high oil content which makes it very resistant to rot and to drying out and splitting.

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Old 05-11-2009
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It is about the only wood that if left untreated in an exterior marine environment will weather out to a nice look. Most if not all other woods will deteriorate quickly.
Be aware that Teak is very soft and easily damaged by shoes, scrapers etc.
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Old 05-11-2009
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It is expensive, it is pretty and it is brittle as it dries out. It gives a boat owner something to finish with oil, varnish, Cetol, Bristol Finish etc., or nothing. It is traditionally used on boats as it is well suited for the marine environment.
Did I mention that it is expensive? Marine teak costs even more.
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Old 05-11-2009
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more reasons are; teak has silica in it. it's the only wood that is not slippery when wet. (why it's used for decks) it's stable wet and dry, hardly any swelling and shrinking.
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Old 05-12-2009
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It's a conspiracy by boat products companies, WM and other chandleries to keep us perpetually buying and endless array of teak cleaners, varnishes, oils, urethanes, etc. etc. and forever chat and blog about our choices with fellow boaters!!
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Old 05-12-2009
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So Liether says it's a "hard wood" and DavidPM says its "very soft".

Interesting debate.

I'll go with "hard", I've never heard of teak described as "soft" before now.
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Looking at the tooling after running a few planks through them, makes me opt for hard too (although the silica is partly responsible for the damage to the tooling)
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some information about Teak from Wikipedia. it is classified as a hardwood because it is a deciduous tree. whether or not the wood is actually "hard" or "soft" does not matter in the classification. it just tends to be that deciduous trees are harder than coniferous trees.

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