Rotted core around baby stay tang :( - Page 2 - SailNet Community

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  #11  
Old 05-14-2009
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Okay so my first task is to figure out how big the rotted area actually is. Hopefully I can get that done before the weekend. Thanks for the tips everyone.
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Old 05-14-2009
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I would cut out the top skin of the deck and do the repair from the topside. Recoring a deck isn't all that big a deal, and is pretty simple to do from the top down. It gets a lot more complicated if you try doing it from the bottom up...since gravity is working against you.
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Old 05-14-2009
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Quote:
Originally Posted by sailingdog View Post
I would cut out the top skin of the deck and do the repair from the topside. Recoring a deck isn't all that big a deal, and is pretty simple to do from the top down. It gets a lot more complicated if you try doing it from the bottom up...since gravity is working against you.
Gravity tends to work against you working from the bottom, and with you working from the top......i2f
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Old 05-15-2009
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recoring from the inside

I think we've had this conversation before. I done an extensive recore job from the bottom (and one from the top). IMO, recoring a moderate to small area (or a big area one section at time) from the bottom is not that big a deal, and is time-effective if you have a head liner to cover the repair. If you do it from the top you will be faced with substantial cosmetic work, especially if you want to preserve the factory ((molded) nonskid pattern. From the top you can re-gelcoat a small area, but getting an exact match is difficult to impossible if the deck has weathered at all. Done from the bottom and hidden by the headliner, no cosmetic stuff is needed and no one can even tell that a repair was done. One the other hand if you are planning to paint the deck anyway, it is a no-brainer to do it from the top.
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Old 05-15-2009
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I have some kind of fiberglass rib right below the affected area, which the tang assembly bolts to. Would that rib prevent a repair from underneath?
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Isn't that what i said???
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Gravity tends to work against you working from the bottom, and with you working from the top......i2f
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fiberglass rib

The fiberglass rib definately complicates things if you choose to work from the bottom. If it is fairly narrow you might be able to work underneath it by cutting openings along both sides and chiselling out core and cleaning up , but I would think that would be a real knuckle scraper. It would probably be easier to just cut out portion of the rib over the affected area (or possibly a somewhat larger section to allow some overlap) and reglass it into place after the core repair.
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Today I spent several hours with a cut up coat hanger digging more rot out. As I dug, the junk went from wet to very moist to moistish, and the color went from dark to light. It got much harder to dig toward the end and very little was coming out. I left a heat lamp pointed at it.

I also asked Brewers what it would cost to recore it. They told me a ballpark guesstimate is $500 per square foot! And that does not include finish like gel coat or teak! He also confirmed that matching the nonskid and color will be a challenge, that they can do that if they do the finish work but it won't be perfect.

But, he said I should consider less drastic measures. He is going to come by with a moisture meter and take some readings. he suggested that it might be possible to drill some holes from below and use heat lamps to dry it out over the course of the season. But he won't know until he comes by.

currently, there is a void that extends about 3 to 4 inches from the opening, depending upon direction.

I had an idea. Suppose I enlarge the opening to 3 inches by 1 inch. Then I could get some core material, cut it into 3 inch by 1 inch blocks, and test fit the pieces. Once they all fit, I could coat them with epoxy and slide them in place. I could leave about half an inch of space, which i could then fill with thickened epoxy. Then add a chain plate cover.

Does that make sense?
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Quote:
Originally Posted by jarcher View Post
Today I spent several hours with a cut up coat hanger digging more rot out. As I dug, the junk went from wet to very moist to moistish, and the color went from dark to light. It got much harder to dig toward the end and very little was coming out. I left a heat lamp pointed at it.

I also asked Brewers what it would cost to recore it. They told me a ballpark guesstimate is $500 per square foot! And that does not include finish like gel coat or teak! He also confirmed that matching the nonskid and color will be a challenge, that they can do that if they do the finish work but it won't be perfect.

But, he said I should consider less drastic measures. He is going to come by with a moisture meter and take some readings. he suggested that it might be possible to drill some holes from below and use heat lamps to dry it out over the course of the season. But he won't know until he comes by.
Yes, but you're better off cutting the skin off, cutting the core material away and re-coring. It'll be a lot faster...
Quote:
currently, there is a void that extends about 3 to 4 inches from the opening, depending upon direction.

I had an idea. Suppose I enlarge the opening to 3 inches by 1 inch. Then I could get some core material, cut it into 3 inch by 1 inch blocks, and test fit the pieces. Once they all fit, I could coat them with epoxy and slide them in place. I could leave about half an inch of space, which i could then fill with thickened epoxy. Then add a chain plate cover.

Does that make sense?
I wouldn't recommend this, since there is a good chance you'll leave a void.
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a boat to the sea you don't love, she'll shake you off just as sure as the turning of the worlds. Love keeps
her going when she oughta fall down, tells you she's hurting 'fore she keens. Makes her a home.

—Cpt. Mal Reynolds, Serenity (edited)

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  #20  
Old 05-16-2009
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Quote:
Originally Posted by sailingdog View Post
I wouldn't recommend this, since there is a good chance you'll leave a void.
Okay, is the void I have too big to fill with thickened epoxy?
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