Installing a Brass keel shoe - SailNet Community

   Search Sailnet:

 forums  store  


Quick Menu
Forums           
Articles          
Galleries        
Boat Reviews  
Classifieds     
Search SailNet 
Boat Search (new)

Shop the
SailNet Store
Anchor Locker
Boatbuilding & Repair
Charts
Clothing
Electrical
Electronics
Engine
Hatches and Portlights
Interior And Galley
Maintenance
Marine Electronics
Navigation
Other Items
Plumbing and Pumps
Rigging
Safety
Sailing Hardware
Trailer & Watersports
Clearance Items

Advertise Here






Go Back   SailNet Community > On Board > Gear & Maintenance
 Not a Member? 
  #1  
Old 11-13-2002
Junior Member
 
Join Date: Nov 2002
Posts: 2
Thanks: 0
Thanked 0 Times in 0 Posts
Rep Power: 0
Joshuadawn is on a distinguished road
Installing a Brass keel shoe

I recently had a brass keel shoe re-installed which supports the bottom end of my rudder, which has a similar shoe. two un-threaded brass rods were used to secure the shoe to the keel.They were hamered into a pre-drilled hole which went in one side of the shoe through the keel and exited the opposite side of the shoe. Prior to hammering them in the holes were filled with silkaflex. Is there a chance thes pins could work themselvews out over time? It just doesnt seem like there is much holding them in place other than the silkaflex. Is this the proper way to install un-threaded brass pins? If anyone can answer my longwinded question it would be great.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message Share with Facebook
  #2  
Old 11-13-2002
Member
 
Join Date: Oct 2002
Posts: 46
Thanks: 0
Thanked 1 Time in 1 Post
Rep Power: 0
windship2 is on a distinguished road
Installing a Brass keel shoe

Joshuadawn,
I would also be worried about this.
These brass rods will probably Work their way loose and I think it could happen in a short period of time.
Could they use brass lag bolts? Or better yet, they could have used slotted head tappered bolts and tapped the holes on one side of the shoe? This is the way I''ve seen it done.

Dennis
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message Share with Facebook
  #3  
Old 11-13-2002
paulk's Avatar
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Jun 2000
Location: CT/ Long Island Sound
Posts: 2,555
Thanks: 4
Thanked 23 Times in 22 Posts
Rep Power: 15
paulk is on a distinguished road
Installing a Brass keel shoe

Drifts are a common fastener for holding large timbers together, and make sense in this application. Chappelle mentions them extensively, as do the Pardeys. Sometimes the ends are peened over if they project, essentially turning them into huge rivets. They are likely what was used originally, and if they''re long enough to hold well, the yard probably saw no reason to change. They are cheaper than bolts, less likely to break in driving than carriage bolts, and because they don''t have threads, don''t have little channels for water (and rot) to get in. A little like metal trunnels, and very traditional. Ask the guys who did the work.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message Share with Facebook
  #4  
Old 11-13-2002
Jeff_H's Avatar
Moderator
 
Join Date: Feb 2000
Location: Annapolis, Md
Posts: 6,669
Thanks: 5
Thanked 103 Times in 79 Posts
Rep Power: 10
Jeff_H has a spectacular aura about Jeff_H has a spectacular aura about Jeff_H has a spectacular aura about
Installing a Brass keel shoe

While I agree with Paul that Drifts are a traditional fastening, they are used where there is a lot of bearing such as might occur in edge fastening a wooden rudder or tieing dead wood together. They were often peened over a washer at the ends. Where drifts were used with less bearing they were often splayed at an angle so that the drift pins would need to be withdrawn in total to allow the parts to separate.

There are a number of problems with what you discribe. First, brass is a very poor choice for this application. Brass is very electrolytically active and not especially strong. Silicone Bronze or everdur bronze would have been a much better choice. The holes in both sides of the the bronze shoe should have been countersunk and bronze rods used. The Bronze rods should have been peened over on each end to form flush rivet heads. This is a very traditional way to install a shoe.

Jeff
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message Share with Facebook
Reply

Quick Reply
Message:
Options

By choosing to post the reply above you agree to the rules you agreed to when joining Sailnet.
Click Here to view those rules.

Register Now

In order to be able to post messages on the SailNet Community forums, you must first register.
Please enter your desired user name, your email address and other required details in the form below.
Please note: After entering 3 characters a list of Usernames already in use will appear and the list will disappear once a valid Username is entered.
User Name:
Password
Please enter a password for your user account. Note that passwords are case-sensitive.
Password:
Confirm Password:
Email Address
Please enter a valid email address for yourself.
Email Address:

Log-in

Human Verification

In order to verify that you are a human and not a spam bot, please enter the answer into the following box below based on the instructions contained in the graphic.




Currently Active Users Viewing This Thread: 1 (0 members and 1 guests)
 
Thread Tools

 
Posting Rules
You may post new threads
You may post replies
You may post attachments
You may edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is On


Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
Fixed or swing keel, which is better? TimG2 General Discussion (sailing related) 17 07-30-2014 10:23 AM
Fin Keel or Shoal Keel acmecoyote General Discussion (sailing related) 11 05-06-2011 05:39 PM
reducing keel/adding fin? abacosol Gear & Maintenance 9 07-01-2007 10:32 PM
Keel Anxiety! Spang Boat Review and Purchase Forum 8 06-19-2006 04:09 PM
Short Keel vs Normal SEAJM General Discussion (sailing related) 1 03-12-2003 03:13 AM


All times are GMT -4. The time now is 01:20 PM.

Add to My Yahoo!         
Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.7
Copyright ©2000 - 2014, vBulletin Solutions, Inc.
SEO by vBSEO 3.6.1
(c) Marine.com LLC 2000-2012

The SailNet.com store is owned and operated by a company independent of the SailNet.com forum. You are now leaving the SailNet forum. Click OK to continue or Cancel to return to the SailNet forum.