Rope/Line Terminology Question - SailNet Community

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  #1  
Old 06-27-2009
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Line/Rope Terminology Question

Hello all,

I just took a job on a charter sailboat on a NY Finger Lake, and the captain posed a question for which the reward is a bottle of local wine.

After explaining that all ropes on a sailboat are called lines, he stopped and corrected himself. He said there are 4 ropes on a sailboat excluding this rule of thumb. My question is if any of you veterans know what they are.

We are currently working on a schooner, although I'm unsure if these ropes are exclusive to schooners. Any ideas?

Thanks,
Malabar VII newbie crewman
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Old 06-27-2009
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Rope/Line Terminology Question

Hello all,

I just took a job on a charter sailboat on a NY Finger Lake, and the captain posed a question for which the reward is a bottle of local wine.

After explaining that all ropes on a sailboat are called lines, he stopped and corrected himself. He said there are 4 ropes on a sailboat excluding this rule of thumb. My question is if any of you veterans know what they are.

We are currently working on a schooner, although I'm unsure if these ropes are exclusive to schooners. Any ideas?

Thanks,
Malabar VII newbie crewman
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Old 06-27-2009
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Boltrope - the rope sewn into the luff of the sail.

There's one.
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Old 06-27-2009
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How many masts? Do the sails use bolt "ropes" to attach the luff or foot to grooves in the the mast or boom? (As opposed to slugs or cars.)
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Old 06-27-2009
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sailaway21 is just really nice sailaway21 is just really nice sailaway21 is just really nice sailaway21 is just really nice
Ashley says that traditionally there are seven ropes on board ship but that, in reality, over sixty have been called rope over the years. To the best of my knowledge he does not expand further on the matter!

bolt rope (already mentioned)
bell rope, for the ship's bell
foot rope, suspended beneath the yards for the seaman's feet

I'm sure someone will come up with another, if not all seven (for extra credit?), soon enough for you to pass muster, and win the wine.
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Anchor rode.
Main/Jib halyard.

Kary
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Old 06-27-2009
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Size really does matter

According to the "Oxford Companion to Ships and the Sea" the definition is...

"Rope -- the name given in the maritime world to all cordage of over 2.5 centimeters (1 in.) in diameter, whether made from natural, or manmade, fibres, or wire. ..."

I hope this helps...

Skipper, J/36 "Zero Tolerance"

PS There were no listings under "Rope" specifying particular uses. Likely, the listing(s) would be under the word preceeding "Rope" in a multi-word name.
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Old 06-27-2009
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Does this help?

Bell Rope - attaches to the clapper of a bell
Stonk Knots design in rope - Bell ropes in hemp and cotton

Footrope - a rope rigged below a yard

Bucket rope - a rope attached to the bucket

Manrope - a rope along the side of a ladder or gangway

That's the best I can do.

Rik
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Old 06-27-2009
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What, only four?


According to The Art of Rigging By George Biddlecombe

ROPES. - All cordage in general, above one inch in circumference, which bear different names, according to their various uses.

BOLT-ROPE.—A rope to which the edges of a sail are sewed, in order to strengthen and prevent them from splitting. That part of a bolt-rope which is on the sides of a square-sail, are called the leech-ropes; that at the top, the head-rope; and that at the bottom, the foot-rope. Stay-sails have no head-rope. A Bolt Rope is the rope sewed to the skirts or edges of sails.

BREASTROPE.—To secure the leadsman when in the chains, heaving the lead. A Breast Rope is fastened along the laniards of the shrouds, for safety, when heaving the lead in the chains.

BUOY-ROPE.—The rope which fastens the buoy to the anchor. It should be a little more than equal in length to the depth of the water where the anchor lies, as it is intended to float near, or immediately above the bed of it, that the pilot or officer may at all times know the situation thereof. It should be always of sufficient strength to weigh the anchor, if necessary. (PL 6, fig. 10.) A Buoy Rope is a rope fastened to the buoy of the anchor.

DAVIT ROPE is the lashing which secures the davit to the shrouds, when out of use.

ENTERING ROPES hang from the upper part of the stanchions alongside the ladder at the gangways.

GUEST ROPES is fastened to an eye-bolt in the ship's side, and to the outer end of a boom, project- ing from the ship's side, by guys, to keep the boats clear off the sides.

HEAD-ROPES are the ropes sewed along the upper edge of sails, &c., to strengthen them; when applied to flags, are termed Headlines.

HEEL ROPE is to haul out jib-booms, and the bowsprits of cutters, etc.

MAN-ROPES — A general name given to the small sets of ropes, used for ascending or descending a ship's side, hatchways, &c. Bowsprit horses are also called man-ropes.

PASSING ROPES lead round the ship, through eyes in the quarter, waist, gangway, and forecastle stanchions, forward to the knight-heads.

RING ROPES are occasionally made fast to the ring-bolts in the deck, and by cross-turns round the cable, to confine it securely in stormy weather.
Slip Rope is to trice the bight of the cable into the head, and is also employed in casting off a vessel in a tide-way, etc.

SLIP-ROPE is a rope used to trice up the bight of other ropes; as, Get a slip rope round the bight of the cable, and trice it up into the head.

TILLER ROPE is the rope by which the tiller is worked. (Explained in Part III).

TOP-ROPE.—A rope employed to sway up a top-mast or topgallant mast, in order to fix it in its place, or to lower it in tempestuous weather, or when it is no longer necessary. The rope used on this occasion for the top-masts is, on account of their great weight, furnished with a top-tackle at its lower end, to hoist or lower the mast with greater facility. A top rope is a rope rove through the heel of a top-mast, to raise it by its tackle. to the mast-head,

Last edited by bheintz; 06-27-2009 at 04:33 AM.
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Old 06-27-2009
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I would include the rope on the ships bell.
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