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Go Back   SailNet Community > On Board > Gear & Maintenance
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  #11  
Old 06-28-2009
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Quote:
Originally Posted by preservedkillick View Post
Excellent information everyone!

Henry, those sail covers look short..do you flake the sail down, then fold it into thirds?

PS. Looked at your pictures, love the woodwork, and your headsail sheet attachment!
Thanks for the compliments. Chiquita is the perfect boat for us in the waters we sail but I do lust after a boat like yours for bigger water!

I made the covers with Sailrite materials and sized them to just fit the sails. I just stuff them in whichever way they will go. The individual headsails on this cutter are much smaller than the jib would be on an equivalent sized sloop. I just got a new suit of sails that are much stiffer than my old sails. It's a real challenge to get the bags to encase them.
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  #12  
Old 06-28-2009
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I do much the same thing with my hank-on headsails as Sailormon et al. (flake down on deck by pulling from the clew, then fold). However, I do the folding part slightly differently, and I think this way is faster and safer if you're doing it in any kind of seas.

Instead of folding the flaked sail from the clew forward, you just sit on the foredeck next to the sail (while it's still hanked on). Say the sail is flaked down on the port side deck; you sit to starboard, facing the sail, about a sail-bag-length away from the tack. You put your right hand under the sail in front of you, reach with your left hand one sail bag length towards the clew, and sort of sweep the sail with your left hand under your right, all the way up to the tack. Repeat until the sail is all folded up; each fold goes under the previous one.

I like this because it doesn't require walking forward with sail in hand. The sail seems to fit much more easily into the bag than when it is haphazardly stuffed, yet it definitely doesn't fold in exactly the same place every time. Also, it leaves the sheets sticking out from under the folded sail; if you pull the sheets, it automatically unfolds the sail, sort of like a poor man's furler. The result fits neatly within the confines of the pulpit.

I started using this method on an overnight trip in April with our 135%; every night I'd fold it up this way, leave it hanked on, and pull the bag over it (sheets sticking out of the top of the bag). Next morning I'd get up and pull the bag off and be ready to hoist right from there.
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Old 06-29-2009
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I should add to my previous comment that, when I made the larger sailbag, I installed a zipper the full length of one side. After I folded the sail, I unzipped the bag all the way, and pulled the open, flat bag under the sail. Then I zipped it up around the sail. It was easier to zip the bag around the sail than to stuff the sail into the bag. The bag also had a drawstring on the open end, and a D ring on the other end, so the sail could be lashed on deck if necessary.
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Old 06-29-2009
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Sailormon: that sounds like a good idea. Did you come up with any way of keeping the bag+sail suspended above the deck, or did it rest right on the deck?
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Old 06-29-2009
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The bag laid on the deck. It was made of Sunbrella that matched the boat's other canvas, and looked good. I never stored it there long-term, so moisture or mildew under it was never a concern.
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Old 06-29-2009
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" Did you come up with any way of keeping the bag+sail suspended above the deck,"
The jib halyard? :-)
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Old 06-29-2009
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We've got a Pacific Blue sunbrella foresail bag that holds a 155 and a 180 Genoa that we bought at Minney's Yacht Surplus. It's got overlapping twist grommets on the front (which snap around the forestay), a nylon mesh bottom that can sit on the foredeck and drain, and a sewn "D" ring at the aft end of the top zipper that takes the jib halyard to hoist it off deck ( good for drying and access to the hawse pipe for the chain locker).
Keeping it hoisted means you have to secure the bitter end of the halyard to the lifeline gate to prevent "halyard slap" and an insurrection by your dockmates. Otherwise, you have the convenience of a hanked on sail ready to hoist and run the sheets (which we keep coiled in the bag as well) and one less bag to store below in a locker.
We see alot of shredded headsails on roller furling because of the UV exposure and alot of them inadvertantly unfurl in a strong blow.
I think replacing the sail bag is probably cheaper, or just leave bare poles if you're not going to be around for a while.
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Old 06-30-2009
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Quote:
Originally Posted by hellosailor View Post
" Did you come up with any way of keeping the bag+sail suspended above the deck,"
The jib halyard? :-)
I tried that but didn't like the way it put strain on the seams of the bag (which btw is not a Sunbrella bag but just a nylon sail bag).
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Adam-
You can probably come up with something simple to releave the strain. Maybe take a loop of tubular webbing, or 5/8" line, with an eye in each end. Then simply loop it around the sailbag, pull one eye through the other, attach the halyard to the top eye. Now the load becomes a compression cord around the bag, squeezing it shut while lifting it, instead of pulling the seam apart.
Or you could simply loop the halyard around the bag and clip it back on itself.
Or have someone sew a piece of tubular webbing into the sail bag, giving you a strong supporting strap to hook onto.
Whatever floats the boat.

I confess, I like the idea of being able to stow sails quickly (no matter which method) and securing the boat in a trice. Of course since that's "boat work" even a trice takes ten times longer and costs four times as much, right? :-)
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Some good ideas... I'll look into them. Thanks for the input.
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