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-   -   Rotten Deck Core (http://www.sailnet.com/forums/gear-maintenance/55809-rotten-deck-core.html)

mjrogers 06-30-2009 12:19 PM

Rotten Deck Core
 
My C-22 has developed a soft fore deck. There are areas of delamination on port and likely rot on the starboard deck and the vertical face forward of the cabin. The fore stay is tied to the bow eye, the side stays are tied to the midship bulkhead, and the fore and aft shrouds have 1' square 1/8" stainless steel backing plates. The deck is solid under the mast and the standing rigging.

Obviously, the first option is to remove the deck from the top and replace the 1/4" plywood core. The second option is to sell the boat for whatever I can get. There is a third option which is use the boat gently until I fix it or get rid of it. Now if I chose the third option I would be mindful to sail within a few miles of land and get the sails down if the wind pipes up. Somewhere like the Chespeake Bay, the rivers emptying in the North Carolina's sounds, or the bayou's in the Flroida panhandle

I have been considering getting rid of the boat since we have a H-25 as well (but its too big to trailer), the last thing I need is another project, and we plan to ultimatly sell both boats and find a bigger boat to move aboard. My question posed to the collective wisdom of the site is, would option 3 be too risky to consider? Thanks, Michael

DwayneSpeer 06-30-2009 05:34 PM

Full of C**p
 
I almost hate to suggest this because the "experts" on this site will say I'm full of crap but there is yet another option. You can stabilize in place what you have and make it considerably stronger. Drill 1/4 inch holes in a one inch pattern thru the top fiberglsss over the soft places, let it dry for a considerable time and fill the space with Smith Systems penetrating sealer. Make sure the interior is dry before applying the Smith Systems. Once all is cured, seal the holes, apply a little paint and go sailing.

DrB 06-30-2009 08:12 PM

Agree with Dwayne...
 
Drill it, dry it, fill it, sand it, paint it, sail it.

DrB

sailingdog 06-30-2009 08:30 PM

IF the area is larger than about a square foot... you really should re-core the area.

Maine Sail 06-30-2009 08:34 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by mjrogers (Post 501609)
My question posed to the collective wisdom of the site is, would option 3 be too risky to consider? Thanks, Michael

Probably not seeing as a HUGE number of sailboats out there are sailing with soggy decks. Just be mindful of where your moisture is. At chain plates or mast steps it's not so good but in random spots I have yet to see a deck or boat catastrophically self destruct.

I have had buddies ask me to bring my moisture meter along when I arrive for a sail. They are always amazed at how much moisture we find..

Personally, based on your future plans, I would say to sail it now then sell it as is. You may actually further reduce the value by cutting up the decks if you are not proficient at fiberglass repairs. I would be very wary of buying any boat with DIY deck repair unless I had a full stack of photos to asses the techniques used.

I vote for sail it and then sell it.. ;)

MedSailor 06-30-2009 08:37 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by DwayneSpeer (Post 501706)
I almost hate to suggest this because the "experts" on this site will say I'm full of crap but there is yet another option. You can stabilize in place what you have and make it considerably stronger. Drill 1/4 inch holes in a one inch pattern thru the top fiberglsss over the soft places, let it dry for a considerable time and fill the space with Smith Systems penetrating sealer. Make sure the interior is dry before applying the Smith Systems. Once all is cured, seal the holes, apply a little paint and go sailing.

A word of advice on this technique. Have someone below make sure you're not drilling all the way through. A, um... friend of mine:rolleyes: was drilling what I thought were shallow holes, but the lack of resistance from the rotten deck felt different than normal drilling. I-um... my friend ended up with lots of epoxy all over his seat cushions. :mad:

MedSailor

mjrogers 07-01-2009 06:29 AM

So, we have one vote for sail it and sell it. That is my real question. Is this boat safe to sail conservatively?

If it were a small area I would drill and inject, but I am suspicious of the entire foredeck as well as the vertical face forward on the cabin. I suspect it would take less time to cut the deck than it would to drill all those holes.

I haven't done a repair like this but, I was a journeyman (approaching master) carpenter in my first career, so, I'm good with my hands and could probably do a decent job. I just don't have time for another big project. We have an ancient house which we are remodeling and like an idiot I told my new wife that I was a good carpenter. She's a doll and it is impossible to turn her down.

Thanks, Michael

CaptainForce 07-01-2009 06:39 AM

Most vessels are designed with the structure of the hull and rig not dependent on the deck. I believe most surveyors would consider this a cosmetic problem as opposed to a structural problem. I think you would be able to get away with option three and not even be extra "gentle" except for no "rhino stomping" on the deck. 'take care and joy, Aythya crew

saildork 07-01-2009 10:24 AM

MJ, Given that your stays and shrouds are attached at stout and uncompromised structures, I would say you can sail her like you would if she were brand new. Get the rigging tensioned appropriately and have fun.:D

If you start seeing the deck peel up at the headstay chainplate or you're taking on water through your shroud chainplates, then you have a problem that needs attention.:(

One good thing about the C22 is that you don't have a fortune invested in her. And even if you get to the point where you can't safely sail her, you can part-out the boat and at least recoup some of your investment. Big market out there among C22 sailors for parts, project boats, etc.

Don't disappoint your wife.:( She needs you to make her a home. In the meantime, I'll wager she will be happy to have you spend some time rehabbing your boat if you want to.:)

Pat
C22 'Stargazer'

mjrogers 07-01-2009 11:41 AM

Well, I like what I'm hearing. The forward lower shrouds are close to the rot but sound OK when I tap the deck though there is no guarantee they won't "pump" from wind and wave action. I have enough time to pull the forward chainplates for inspection and reinforce as needed. I'll Inspect the other chainplates and stem fitting closely and if they are OK I'll declare "Damn the core-rot, full speed ahead!" Thanks, Michael


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