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Go Back   SailNet Community > On Board > Gear & Maintenance
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  #11  
Old 07-25-2009
zAr zAr is offline
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Wow, plenty of good suggestions here. I'm already putting many into practice and I think it's helping. Thank you everyone.
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  #12  
Old 07-28-2009
zAr zAr is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by JimMcGee View Post
Zar,

What brand and type of varnish did he use?

The good news is rigging a fan has a pretty good chance of drying the varnish, but you'll probably have to wash the cushions and carpet to get rid of the residual odor.

Don't even think about moving aboard if there is still a strong odor. Solvent fumes can make you VERY sick or even kill you in high enough concentrations. Long term exposure will definitely cause long term problems.

Jim
Hi Jim,

You're right, I think the ventilation idea is working a bit. The fumes aren't as strong now.

Here's what he used:

Antique Oil Finish - Specialty Products

I hope the "oil" in this stuff is linseed oil and not some sort of petroleum distillate.

Mind, I'm beginning to second guess whether it is varnish that I'm smelling. I've been sniffing the wood and while there is a general smell of linseed oil wafting through the boat, the wood itself only smells very slightly of linseed. I found this baffling.

However, today I was taking off the upholstery fabric covers and washing them. I sniffed them and immediately recognized the "fume" smell which has been driving me crazy - it's the plastic-like bottom of all the covers. Vinyl? Pleather?

I think I should start smoking so as to dull my olfactory senses.

zAr
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  #13  
Old 10-13-2009
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varnish fume abatement

I am dealing with the same issue 4 months after the aft cabin was totally sanded out & revarnished in our Westsail 42.

The aft cabin air is tolerable during the day when the sea breeze is up but at night the air can go still.

Installing a fan in the forward hatch allows air to be drawn in thru the portlights continuously when there is no breeze maintaining a continuous sweep of fresh air into the boat and then exhausted.
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Old 10-13-2009
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Gelcoat fumes are truly terrible... they blew right through my respirator filter, and fuzzed my brain up. I am generally more sensitive to fumes than anyone else I know. I would suggest investing in a good $50 respirator, and some extra filters. Replace the filters regularly. Suggested once every workday. Now, with your respirator on, go in the boat and work out a ventilation system. It helps to pull all of cushions out and leave them in the sun for a few hours. Open all dorades, hatches etc, put on a few small fans (this is better than one large one) . In the future, use something a little less aggressive as an interior wood finish. I use none.
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Old 10-13-2009
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I second havig a heater on in the boat to keep the temp up and speed up curing. Venting will help.
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Old 10-13-2009
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A heater doesn't actually have to heat the boat much. What really makes it help is that it reduces the humidity. Humidty is more of problem than temperature in most cases.

Gary H. Lucas
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