Lazy Jacks...yay or nay? - Page 3 - SailNet Community

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  #21  
Old 08-18-2009
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Lazy Jacks and a stack pack type of sail cover are IMO great for lowering a sail fast and easy, esp when single handing. As far a raising the sail the batons can get hung up ( it helps to loosen the lazy jacks before raising)… but on our boat this requires going forward anyways (where the halyard is), which defeats the objective of staying out of the weather,, unless this can all be led aft.

Regarding Jeff’s comment about the flaking of the sail properly I think the Stack Pack helps in this regard, our sail seems to flake itself quite nicely inside its open “clam”. Ours is a custom made cover and not a “Stack Pack” or other proprietary system. Chafing inside of a sail cover can wear a sail too so a good fit and not folding the same way every time keep the wear from occuring in one spot.
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  #22  
Old 08-18-2009
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I have the Doyle stac-pack system with lazyjacks on my current boat, had a Dutchman on my previous boat and nothing on the boat before that. None of the systems are perfect, but both the Dutchman and the lazy jacks/Stac-pack were big improvements over nothing. I enjoy shorthand or singlehand sailing, and I always found the single biggest PITA was dropping the main, especially in a strong breeze. Neither the Dutchman nor the Stac-pack make it as easy as it looks on the advertisements, but both work fairly well. The Dutchman works much better on a crisp new sail than an older sail. With both systems I found that the sail does not always just drop down as advertised. With my Dutchman I rigged a downhaul line to a turning block at the mast base, which helped immeasurably when I was single handing (no autopilot, so I did not like to go forward in a breeze). With the Stac-Pack and lazy jacks I set the autopilot and usually do go to the mast base to help it fall smoothly and keep things folding in an orderly manner. I have seen the disadvantages mentioned by others, but don't regard them as overwhelming. I also note that the Stac-Pack does provide some extra windage when the sail is furled, though that is also not the end of the world.
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  #23  
Old 08-18-2009
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i am considering the idea of losing the battens--i learned on gaff rig--didnt have them---and i donot race--so i donot mind not having perfect sail shape----makes a lot of singlehanding with a nearly 20 ft boom easier lol...
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Old 08-18-2009
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I think for most of us it is a Love Hate relationship.

I love them when dropping sails short or single handed particularly when higher winds are about which is often in the West Indies.

I hate them when short / single handed raising the sails.

I hate them when at anchorage and attempt to set up sun awnings to cool the cabin.

I hate them when the wind get up at anchorage and they start of vibrate and make noise.

I hate them when I'm getting the boat ready to go on the hard at the end of the season.

I hate them when I'm getting the boat ready to go back in the water at the start of the season.

I hate them when I'm at the mask working on lines/ halyards. They always seem to overlap what I need to get at.

I hate the cost and limited benefits.

After due thought I guess I hate them....

But... I'm not going to take them down....... yet/ maybe... It is a love hate thing.
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Old 08-18-2009
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I just completed my set of lazy jacks with my own design the lines stow forward along the boom to the mast and then clip into place. A tug on the lines deploys them from the cockpit so they are only up when I drop the sails. I also have the tides Marine track system for my main. The combinaton of the two makes depoying and furling my fully battened main very easy (compared to before) from the cockpit. Luv it so far.
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Old 08-18-2009
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I will put in my 2 cents: Dutchman is the best.

I have used them all. The Dutchman takes a little adjusting to make it right, but after that, it is a clean sail and easy to put the cover back on. Lazy jacks is my second prefernce.

Of course, since this is the internet and money is never an object, I would buy a inboom furler instead. If I was coastal and not a racer, an inmast (Which I have now). I actually prefer the dutchman to the inmast, believe it or not - but that is another conversation, isn't it?

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Quote:
Originally Posted by eherlihy View Post
I have sailed with the Dtuchman system, and admire the clean neat flaking. However, the monofilament line adds additional windage,
Lets not forget the added weight aloft, in addition to extra windage.
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Old 08-18-2009
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I usually agree with most of what Jeff H says, but in this case I must say that the laztjacks I made using heavy shock cord have made life easy for us. We retract them to the mast after we get to the dock and flake our sail (with no crimps like Jeff said so as not to ruin it) and have no problem therefore with our sail cover.

We have never lost them up the mast. They have 2 major triangles and the hook on the boom we place the cord under when setting them in place never lets them loose (we loop it around it).

The are against the mast when raising the main and are a non issue. It sure is easier and safer to just drop the main and neaten things up when we get back to the dock

Dave
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  #29  
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I had a Dutchman set up on my Ericson 32 and ended up taking it off. Just didn't like it and it didn't seem to do a very good job of gathering the sail. My current boat, a J40 came with lazyjacks and while I liked them I found putting the sailcover on a bit of a hassle. Earlier this season I sewed up a homemade version of the stack pack and redesigned the lazyjacks (from three to four legs) and now like it very much. I do have to take them forward to raise the sail to keep the battens from fouling, but that's not that hard. Dropping the sail is now a dream. Loosen the halyard and then zip it up. Presto, all done. I prefer the added work to come when raising, when usually fresh and in calmer conditions rather than when dousing, which can come at a difficult time or when tired.
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Old 08-19-2009
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With a StackPack-type sail cover, how are the sailcover "flaps" positioned when sailing? Are they pulled up by the lazyjacks? Or do they flop down around and below the boom? We have lazyjacks that we pull forward around the reefing hooks at the gooseneck before we put on the current sailcover and to keep out of the way when raising the sail. I like the idea of sewing up a homemade version of the stack pack, but am trying to picture how it looks when under sail.

TIA
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