Estimating Time to Restore a Boat - Page 2 - SailNet Community
 10Likes
Reply
 
LinkBack Thread Tools
post #11 of 56 Old 09-02-2009
Junior Member
 
Join Date: Aug 2009
Posts: 10
Thanks: 0
Thanked 0 Times in 0 Posts
Rep Power: 0
 
Smile Boat repair

I have an old Endeavour 32 thgat needs replacement of ports and headliner reapirs (among other minor things). Loaction is Northern NJ. I have the new ports and am looking for an experienced person to do the repairs localy.
Any suggestions are appreciated.
Thanks,
nick
nickpapa is offline  
Quote Quick Reply Share with Facebook
Sponsored Links
Advertisement
 
post #12 of 56 Old 09-02-2009
Midwest Puddle Pirate
 
US27inKS's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2005
Location: Gardner, KS
Posts: 2,160
Thanks: 0
Thanked 0 Times in 0 Posts
Rep Power: 12
   
My background is in auto repair. I own an auto repair shop, and also have decent carpentry skills. I bought a 27 ft sailboat that was in need of repairs. The problem that I had with estimating the repair time was that I had no boat experience and especially no water damage experience. I had no idea how the deck was constructed, or that it could be a problem. All I knew was what I could see. The bulkheads were rotten, and the floor was was rotten. Once I got into the project, it seemed to go on forever. Based on what I could see and what I knew about boats (exactly nothing) I assumed a 3-4 month project. I worked every weekend, all weekend for 3 years. Research time was tremendous, but I could do that during the week. Obtaining parts usually happened on the weekend, but I tried to do that while epoxy was drying.

I could have fixed it faster, but once I saw pictures of what the boat could be, I couldn't leave one area old and nasty while others were new. Then I couldn't have a beautiful interior with a crappy looking exterior, so I had to paint it.

I must say that my wife was very patient for the fist two and a half years. Then I endured a solid 6 months of a very unhappy wife who would do almost anything to occupy my weekend.

Here's what I saw.



And what it turned into


In the end it turned out good though, and my wife loves the boat.


To view links or images in signatures your post count must be 10 or greater. You currently have 0 posts.
John USYacht 27 "Cora Lee"
US27inKS is offline  
Quote Quick Reply Share with Facebook
post #13 of 56 Old 09-02-2009
Junior Member
 
Join Date: Aug 2009
Posts: 10
Thanks: 0
Thanked 0 Times in 0 Posts
Rep Power: 0
 
Great Job!
nickpapa is offline  
Quote Quick Reply Share with Facebook
post #14 of 56 Old 09-02-2009
Junior Member
 
Join Date: Aug 2009
Posts: 10
Thanks: 0
Thanked 0 Times in 0 Posts
Rep Power: 0
 
Smile Boat refinishing

Can you provide details of the work done?
I am looking to do the same on a old Endeavour 32 and am trying to figure out if it is worth it.

Thanks,
Nick
nickpapa is offline  
Quote Quick Reply Share with Facebook
post #15 of 56 Old 09-02-2009
Midwest Puddle Pirate
 
US27inKS's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2005
Location: Gardner, KS
Posts: 2,160
Thanks: 0
Thanked 0 Times in 0 Posts
Rep Power: 12
   
Quote:
Originally Posted by nickpapa View Post
Can you provide details of the work done?
I can, but it's quite lengthy and involved, depending on how much detail you want. Let me know how deep into it you want me to go, I will be happy to write a book for you.

Quote:
I am looking to do the same on a old Endeavour 32 and am trying to figure out if it is worth it.
The answer is almost universally NO. Unless the boat was free, needs what appears to be only minimal work on the surface, and will be worth a fortune when you're done, it will be cheaper to go buy a good one.

This is not to say that I'm not proud of my boat, and proud of the fact that I rebuilt it from scrap. I am very proud of it. Financially speaking though, I could have bought a nice boat, and made payments on it. It would have been cheaper, including the interest expense, and I would have been sailing 3 years earlier, without the months of living with a grizzly bear. And I would have had the loan paid off in the same amount of time it took me to rebuild her.


To view links or images in signatures your post count must be 10 or greater. You currently have 0 posts.
John USYacht 27 "Cora Lee"
US27inKS is offline  
Quote Quick Reply Share with Facebook
post #16 of 56 Old 09-02-2009
Junior Member
 
Join Date: Aug 2009
Posts: 10
Thanks: 0
Thanked 0 Times in 0 Posts
Rep Power: 0
 
Thanks

The boat is free, since it's mine and I have neglected her for the last few years. But there is always the tempteation to buy another one.
nickpapa is offline  
Quote Quick Reply Share with Facebook
post #17 of 56 Old 09-02-2009
Reward for lost Kraken!
 
hellosailor's Avatar
 
Join Date: Apr 2006
Posts: 11,481
Thanks: 5
Thanked 132 Times in 129 Posts
Rep Power: 11
   
It is the little things that keep projects bumped back on the ToDo list forever, or make them take 3x-10x as long as you'd expected, even if know how to multiply out "boat time".

Little things, like the day a friend went looking for some common nuts and bolts to reinstall the repaired pulpit we needed for an uncoming race. Just a 45-minute trip to Home Depot. Except, the three he visited didn't carry stainless bolts in stock. So eventually he returned with galvanized from stop #4...which worked, but then the job had to be redone after the right stainless bolts were ordered end of season. How do you log the time for that quick repair?

Or the small chainplate fix that needed a piece of marine lumber. Which Condon's (thank you!) actually gave us free on a "pity rate", after a two hour ride each way. After excavating enough trim to find the real extent of the damage.

Or the easy engine repairs, oh, did you need a crush washer? Worth about a penny a piece, but if you need a dozen somehow, they have to be special ordered from Sweden, where the days and national holidays and summer closings don't quite align with the same sun and moon.

Working on boat repairs is easy: Like dropping a dime behind the ten yard line on a football field, then trying to find it in the dark. It isn't the magnitude of the task that gets you, but always SOME little thing, some two cent part, that you can't get even after you call the launch and get in the car and make the trip to where someone answered the phone and said "oh sure, we've got those".

Which is what the ToDo list is for, after all, when there's no wind and you're stuck with a hour on the boat waiting for latecomers or weather...there's always something to be done. Does the time you spend on those jobs, instead of idly waiting, get subtracted from the time you spend pursuing the two-cent monsters from another part of the world? :-)
hellosailor is offline  
Quote Quick Reply Share with Facebook
post #18 of 56 Old 09-02-2009
Senior Member
 
mitiempo's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2008
Location: Victoria B.C. Canada
Posts: 7,500
Thanks: 0
Thanked 96 Times in 87 Posts
Rep Power: 8
   
When I started working on my current CS27 last October, I had all the tools needed and hundreds of Stainless screws and bolts, marine wire (14/2 & 10/2), sandpaper, and other things needed for a boat. I have lived in Victoria for 22 years and have relationships with our best marine store (Trotac which is 5 minutes away where I have dealt for all 22 years and get a discount - thanks Cam) and a machinist/welder I have known as long and consider a friend (John at Accufab). There still is sometimes need for 1 3/4" bolts when I have 1 1/2 and 2" only. And then there is the times when your favorite store is out and the next two have none either. Victoria is small and nothing is too far away but it's still easy to waste half the day cruising around looking for something specific. That's all part of the job and I think that if your boat doesn't need too much you should go for it if you're capable of the skills needed, but for a complete restoration, if this is aggravating early on you may never get to the end and will develop a hate for the work before you're finished. I wouldn't be doing what I'm doing if 1. I didn't enjoy the work and the challenge of each job and the pride on standing back at the end of the day and admiring the progress made and 2. the pleasure of knowing every item on my boat and knowing how it's installed and works along with the easy ability to fix or replace in later years.
Brian
mitiempo is offline  
Quote Quick Reply Share with Facebook
post #19 of 56 Old 09-02-2009
Member
 
Join Date: Jun 2009
Posts: 38
Thanks: 0
Thanked 0 Times in 0 Posts
Rep Power: 0
 
I'm currently renovating (not restoring) a 33 year old boat, so this strikes close to home.

I have found, for myself, that the greatest obstacle is perfectionism.

I try to remember what I was told in Israel while training with the IDF. An Israeli officer said, "The enemy of 'good' is 'great'". He meant that in our striving for "greatness" or perfection, we often fail to obtain even a "good" result.

While this advice was meant to apply to military operational planning, I think it has merit, for me, for working on my boat.

I have to force myself to only do that work which will get me safely back onto the water. Everything else can wait. The absolutely necessary work is done to a high standard, but secondary work must wait.

I think that many people just can't help themselves try to get their $4000 boat to look like a $40,000 boat, and instead of actually sailing it in a year, they are still working on it (and spending money) ten years later.

Sometimes you must say, "good enough."
OhioTom is offline  
Quote Quick Reply Share with Facebook
post #20 of 56 Old 09-03-2009 Thread Starter
Senior Member
 
davidpm's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2007
Location: Madison
Posts: 3,996
Thanks: 250
Thanked 61 Times in 52 Posts
Rep Power: 8
 
Quote:
Originally Posted by US27inKS View Post
I can, but it's quite lengthy and involved, depending on how much detail you want. Let me know how deep into it you want me to go, I will be happy to write a book for you.

The answer is almost universally NO. Unless the boat was free, needs what appears to be only minimal work on the surface, and will be worth a fortune when you're done, it will be cheaper to go buy a good one.

This is not to say that I'm not proud of my boat, and proud of the fact that I rebuilt it from scrap. I am very proud of it. Financially speaking though, I could have bought a nice boat, and made payments on it. It would have been cheaper, including the interest expense, and I would have been sailing 3 years earlier, without the months of living with a grizzly bear. And I would have had the loan paid off in the same amount of time it took me to rebuild her.
Thank you for your post, you are the poster child for the point of this thread.
Here we have a skilled tradesmen with tools and a shop at his disposal.
The estimate was off by a factor of 10.
Many of the young folks that stop by here every few months do not have skills, or space and the only reason they want to restore an old boat is to save money.
Congratulations for working through the job even though it took so long and cost so much. Most people would have given up.

If you would start a new thread with a blow by blow description of the project I for one would love to read it.
It could be in installments, Month 1 etc.
Jgbrown likes this.
davidpm is offline  
Quote Quick Reply Share with Facebook
Reply

Quick Reply
Message:
Options

By choosing to post the reply above you agree to the rules you agreed to when joining Sailnet.
Click Here to view those rules.

Register Now



In order to be able to post messages on the SailNet Community forums, you must first register.
Please enter your desired user name, your email address and other required details in the form below.
Please note: After entering 3 characters a list of Usernames already in use will appear and the list will disappear once a valid Username is entered.


User Name:
Password
Please enter a password for your user account. Note that passwords are case-sensitive.

Password:


Confirm Password:
Email Address
Please enter a valid email address for yourself.

Email Address:
OR

Log-in









Human Verification

In order to verify that you are a human and not a spam bot, please enter the answer into the following box below based on the instructions contained in the graphic.




Currently Active Users Viewing This Thread: 1 (0 members and 1 guests)
 
Thread Tools
Show Printable Version Show Printable Version
Email this Page Email this Page



Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
Big Freakin' Sails smackdaddy General Discussion (sailing related) 3066 2 Weeks Ago 10:24 AM
Modern Hull forms and Motion Comfort Jeff_H Sailboat Design and Construction 193 10-31-2013 09:29 AM
Coastal v. Bluewater cruiser, your thoughts EveningStar Sailboat Design and Construction 17 11-02-2007 06:13 PM
Understanding Time for Navigation Jim Sexton Seamanship Articles 0 10-14-2004 08:00 PM
Naming and Renaming Your Boat Sue & Larry Cruising Articles 0 12-15-2003 07:00 PM

Posting Rules  
You may post new threads
You may post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is On
Trackbacks are On
Pingbacks are On
Refbacks are On

 
For the best viewing experience please update your browser to Google Chrome