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Go Back   SailNet Community > On Board > Gear & Maintenance
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  #21  
Old 09-18-2009
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Agree on the mirror - I knew a dental assistant years ago and got some discarded dental mirrors. Teflon tape for pipe connections, copper cutting and flaring tool but haven't used this for a few years, double crimpers for 22ga to 4/0, heat gun as I don't use a butane torch, 2 19.2 volt drills w/ matching 19.2 volt lights - great because they stand up and have a rotating head, full tap and die set, lots of clamps and hex key screwdriver bits in a box of 100 assorted.
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  #22  
Old 09-18-2009
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I have one box of tools, one box of electrical stuff (crimps, crimper, soldering iron, shrink wrap) and 1 box of boat parts (spare shackles, small blocks, etc) and screws/bolts.
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  #23  
Old 09-18-2009
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Quote:
Originally Posted by labatt View Post
By the way - regarding inverters and power tool charging - if you have a modified sine wave inverter it MAY burn out your chargers. It's a known issue (and unfortunately one that we have).
Would it just be easier to take a corded drill? I already have one and when you think about it a 25 meter extension cord means I can use the drill anywhere on the boat. But I guess that means running an inverter.

What about a small gas generator for when I need to use the power tools? It could double as an efficient way to charge the batteries if I am on the hook for a few days and don't want to run the diesel?
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Old 09-18-2009
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Originally Posted by labatt View Post
For wrenches, get some ratcheting wrenches. When working in a confined space where it's difficult to get the wrench on something in the first place, the ratcheting wrench is worth its weight in gold. For socket wrenches, do not get the inexpensive sets. Get really heavy duty socket wrenches. We broke several of the cheap ones and then got some Sears Craftmen socket wrenches. We can hammer on the things all day (which has happened) and they don't give an inch. On the cheap ones, you lose half your power in the flex of the handle. A rubber mallet, chisel set, etc. are very handy. I'll have to go through our kit later. For storage (in addition to the larger nylon toolbag we have), we bought these pouches from Loews. They are $12 for two. We use one for all of our pliers, another for all of our screwdrivers, another for all of our wrenches, and the last for all of our electrical connectors. By the way (no relation here), but good quality electrical supplies can be bought from GenuineDealz.com - Marine Electrical, Boat Wire & Cable, Custom Battery Cables. Oh yes - a good ratcheting screwdriver with storage for tips in the handle is very handy. Just make sure you get good quality tools. We prefer craftsmen since we can replace them, no questions asked, when we're in the US. Oh yes - other things - Black and Decker Mouse Sander (we have lots of wood), headlamps (energizer LED ones are great - the red light is really a red light, not a red plastic cover).
I grew up in my grand fathers 3 bay auto service center. Back when you needed your brain to diagnose a problem with a car, not a computer. He defiantly taught me the value of a good tool set and taking care of your tools. He retired some years ago and I inherited some tools from him including a 200 piece socket set (S&K i believe) he had been using for 25 years. My worry is that I don't want to take in on the boat for fear of loosing a piece over the side. I suppose to my grandfather not using them to take care of my marine engine would be more of an insult than loosing a piece though.

Most of my tools are either Mac, Craftmen, DeWalt or Makita.
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  #25  
Old 09-18-2009
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Quote:
Originally Posted by redcobra View Post
I have one box of tools, one box of electrical stuff (crimps, crimper, soldering iron, shrink wrap) and 1 box of boat parts (spare shackles, small blocks, etc) and screws/bolts.
I keep thinking I need to prepare for the worst and yet I get the feeling i will be lugging around a bunch of tools I won't ever need.

As will be the case though, no matter what I take there will be a tool I need that I will not have and cannot find where I am.




And thanks everyone, I would never have thought of bolt cutters, a turkey baster or chisels.

Keep 'em coming if there is something else out there, I love the knowledge on this site;

Robert
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  #26  
Old 09-18-2009
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I also stow my tools by kind:
There's a box just for power tools, which for the boat means mainly the drills (battery and AC) and bits of all kinds including hole saw and wire wheels. That's fairly substantial but a job either needs it all or not.

And an 'electrical' box, which has the crimpers, linesman's dike, terminals, splicing materials...soldering gun.

Then there's the plain old tool box, which is where the screwdrivers and pliers and everything else live. There's electrical tape in everything except the drill box, some redundancy happens as you acquire tools.

The socket set lives in it's own case, as does the Dremel tool. Things just don't always organize neatly, but rather into "everything in this box/case/roll has a similar purpose" and from there, you learn to either grab the cases you need, or pull them out and grab the tools you'll need for a job. I have a very very old army surplus musette bag that simply refuses to die, which winds up being the "I'll throw whatever I need in here" bag, mainly because it has some pockets and dividers that help keep things orderly--but not too orderly.

What I'd really like, and can't seem to find at any reasonable price, are a couple of old fashioned TOOL ROLLS. Plain canvas tool rolls with either pockets or decent elastic webbing in them. Seems like they've gone out of style except for some high-priced sources, but somewhere in China, someone must be stitching them up and selling yard long ones for under ten bucks a piece. Surely, somewhere.
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Quote:
Originally Posted by hellosailor View Post
What I'd really like, and can't seem to find at any reasonable price, are a couple of old fashioned TOOL ROLLS. Plain canvas tool rolls with either pockets or decent elastic webbing in them. Seems like they've gone out of style except for some high-priced sources, but somewhere in China, someone must be stitching them up and selling yard long ones for under ten bucks a piece. Surely, somewhere.
Hellosailor,

I make those, for example I have a roll that I use for different sized diodes, very small, put the diodes in and then roll them up. Really easy to make if you can sew. I use ripstop nylon for the ones I have made but I would use canvas or a heavier nylon for big tools and such.
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  #28  
Old 09-19-2009
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Separate boxes for electrical versus non-electrical. I've actually moved *every* tool I have from the house to the boat, and then moved back those I didn't need. Especially when on the hard, I just work on the boat so much more than the house now. (That needs to change a bit. I have a gutter to put back up, and there are other things. Those can wait until sailing season is over.)

For the electrical kit, I have a good multimeter and a few things that others haven't mentioned: protoboard and an assortment of integrated circuits, logic gates, op-amps, voltage controllers, and (my 2 personal favorites) 555 timers and different sized 12v relays. Add resistors, capacitors, choke/coils of various sizes, led lights, and you can make some useful devices. Like something that keeps your blower on for 5 minutes after you shut down the engine.

Add a remote car starter curcuit and you can have your nav lights flash on and off so you can find your boat at a busy anchorage. (I'm just saying.... you could build it.)

I built an underwater metal detector last year, for finding abandoned moorings and such underwater, but I never got the time to tune it. I really needed an oscilliscope to do that, so I guess for me that's my "other tool" that you find you don't have. (I really should get one, I suppose.)

I don't have it but I've been tempted to get one of those things that you attach to an outlet in your home. It has a small remote that makes a noise when near the outlet's circuit breaker. It helps you determine which circuit breaker is associated with that outlet. That device would be useful for tracing wires on your boat.

Dielectric grease. 2 colors of electrical tape (red and black). 2 spools of 14 guage marine wire (1 red, 1 black). A 50 foot piece of household-type wire -- useful when testing things that are far apart with some temporary power. If it is long enough you could help jump start another boat's engine. A 3 foot piece of thick, 2 guage wire for jumping your house battery to your starting battery. (On our boat they are 2 completely separate circuits except for a common ground. The house's Gel cells at a slightly higher voltage than regular lead-acid, which makes for easier jump starts.) Jumper cables so your wife can jump the batteries when you aren't there -- becuase you have to hold the 3 foot red wire "just so" or else it doesn't work.

Digital camera (the one on the phone works for this) - for when a mirror just won't do. It's how I reached up and "saw" the top of my mast recently. It's how I "read' the model number off the charger that is on the side that I can't read because I can't get my head over there. And I may use it to "see" into the bilge area next to the shower sump. (Either that spot has it's own separate bilge or there's a blockage preventing water in that part of the bilge from flowing to the deep part of the bilge.)

30 feet of garden hose. To siphon water in when you want to clean the bilge. (Hint - Bilge pumps use a lot of power. If you are doing a thorough cleaning, turn your engine on first. Also see the jumper-cable paragraph.) You can also connect the garden hose to a pump of any kind. E.g. wrap electrical tape around the end, lightly overlapping the end, and you've made a softer end that will seat onto the shower drain opening. Turn on your shower sump, hold it firmly onto the drain hole, and you can pump water out from other places on the boat. You want to use a different hose than the one you fill your tanks with.

Spare fiberglass mesh and epoxy kit. With all the trimmings and fillers

Spare injectors, belts, engine hoses -- I guess this is another thread maybe. Extra zincs for heat exchanger, prop shaft, any where else. Extra prop, prop nut, retaining-rig/cotter pin or whatever holds the prop on. (See lost prop thread). Stilson wrench for putting prop back on.

I know Billyruff'n keeps a scuba tank onboard too. That's useful for situations with the prop, or clearing an anchor that got wedged somewhere. Ad mask and fins even if you don't have a scuba tank.

"Kitchen" serrated knife. (Was it CD that got flack for saying he "got a knife from his kitchen" ?? Turns out it was from his land based "galley", so it really was a kitchen.) The serated knife is for freeing a prop from lobster pot lines.

Rigging tension device -- so you know the tension of rigging and can tighten/loosen accordingly.

Manuals on everything -- engine, transmission, windlass, radios, etc. Get the detailed ones with parts lists.

I'm considering these too:

IR temperature detector -- for detecting hot spots on your engine or exhaust.

A spare, self priming pump -- useful for so many things.
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  #29  
Old 09-19-2009
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Quote:
Originally Posted by krozet View Post
Would it just be easier to take a corded drill? I already have one and when you think about it a 25 meter extension cord means I can use the drill anywhere on the boat. But I guess that means running an inverter.

What about a small gas generator for when I need to use the power tools? It could double as an efficient way to charge the batteries if I am on the hook for a few days and don't want to run the diesel?
The answer is yes, take a 115 volt drill.
You would have to run an inverter anyway to charge your power pack and if your power pack is dead when you need it - and it will be - then you are completely out of business for some time.

I have a small inverter that plugs into 12V outlets and it runs just about anything I ask it to. 400 Watts, I believe mine is.

But I'm not a real fan of rechargeable devices. Over time they get weaker and weaker and require charging more and more often. More better I just carry - and protect - spare batteries.
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Old 09-19-2009
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Many great responses and suggestions above.

Here's one nobody's mentioned:



I use this puppy all the time. It really does fit in the palm of your hand. It'll take any 1/4" hex shank bit, so in addition to screwdriver bits you can use nut driver, allen key, torx, etc. Even many of the keyless chuck drill bits use 1/4" hex shanks, and this is great for boring pilot holes in wood.
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