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Go Back   SailNet Community > General Interest Forums > Gear & Maintenance
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  #21  
Old 09-22-2009
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I think there is way to much being made of a simple fix here. I've replaced seacocks with the boat in the water probably a dozen times. I can do it spilling less than 1 cup of water. I would have a helper or a cell phone handy. Also have a wood plug and plumbers putty in case the seacock breaks off (which is extremely unlikely). But with those in hand, just remove the hose, unscrew the seacock, pull it off, cover the hole with your hand, then quickly thread the new one on. It's just not a big deal.
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  #22  
Old 09-22-2009
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No, it's not a big deal until the mushroom turns as is likely with an old fitting. I would use the sink outlet until a haulout is possible.
Brian
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  #23  
Old 09-22-2009
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Yep. What worries me is that the overall look of the fittings is... rotten.
Maybe after a washout they'll look a bit better.

As i'm likely to panic if something breaks... Best to play it a bit safe.

Sol
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  #24  
Old 09-22-2009
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You might just get 15-20 feet of the right diameter hose, and secure it to the toerail with the end a foot or two under water.

Purposefully laying the boat over is a can of worms, may work OK, happens to a lot of boats when they run around...but sometimes it doesn't work out so well... and the boat fills rather than floats, or suffers damage to the hull. Suppose the bay bottom isn't flat and your hull lays into a depression? Grounding your boat on purpose would look mightly dumb if you end up trashing the boat.

Replacing the valve while in the water is another can of worms...may work fine..does often...but sometimes it doesn't. Suspose you can't get the new valve on because the valve seat itself needs replacing...with an older boat, will you even be sure you are starting with a replacement valve whose threads match the original? Pulling a thruhull while in the water would look mightly dumb if you end up trashing the boat.
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Well to each his or her own. It's really no big deal though.

How about this...since you are going to haul the boat out, ask the lift operator to give you a few minutes once the have the lift rigged. Then give the seacock go in the water. You may see it's no big deal and you will save yourself a bunch of money next time.

BTW - You should clean and lube all seacocks annually and operate all of them a few times once a month. That helps prevent this problem.

In response to mitiempo and sailingfool - If the new seacock doesn't fit, you can put the old one back on or insert the plug. The if thru-hull fitting spins, then haul the boat out. It may drip a tiny bit after spinning but that's not going to sink the boat. You could actually just unscrew the seacock and play the the small geyser for quite a long time before you get very much water in the boat. Remember that you are only a foot or two below the surface and at the most they geyser will only go that high. It's not like you're working on a submarine deep under water.
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Old 09-22-2009
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Steve
She apparently has no haulout facilities available nearby. Besides, advising someone new to boats in a foreign country what to do is a bit different than doing it yourself, with your boat, I think.
Brian
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Old 09-22-2009
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Another idea,
Get a piece of hose the same size as the engine hose, about 10 feet long, and a barbed hose splice fitting. Put it in the water over the side and let the whole length fill with water. Kink over one end and pull that end into the boat while the other end remains in the water. Put the end of the hose onto the engine hose using the splice. Remove the kink. You now have a filled hose which will start siphoning instantly when you start the engine. No thruhull needed. I do this all the time to drain large plastic tanks that don't have a bottm drain.

Gary H. Lucas
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  #28  
Old 09-23-2009
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Quote:
Originally Posted by sailingfool View Post
You might just get 15-20 feet of the right diameter hose, and secure it to the toerail with the end a foot or two under water.

Purposefully laying the boat over is a can of worms, may work OK, happens to a lot of boats when they run around...but sometimes it doesn't work out so well... and the boat fills rather than floats, or suffers damage to the hull. Suppose the bay bottom isn't flat and your hull lays into a depression? Grounding your boat on purpose would look mightly dumb if you end up trashing the boat.

Replacing the valve while in the water is another can of worms...may work fine..does often...but sometimes it doesn't. Suspose you can't get the new valve on because the valve seat itself needs replacing...with an older boat, will you even be sure you are starting with a replacement valve whose threads match the original? Pulling a thruhull while in the water would look mightly dumb if you end up trashing the boat.
Well, if I fail to use the sink "out" to install the engine's water inlet, this is a safe idea. Something similar to what GaryHLucas advised.

Could the lenght of the hose, or the fact that it'll have to go all the way up to the deck and then back down over-board, somehow cramp the flow of water to the engine...? Or is the water pump powerfull enough to compensate for this?

Sol
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Old 09-23-2009
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When you completely fill a hose up over the side and down to the engine the water on the outside going up, gets pulled along by the water on the inside going down. The pump only has to make up the difference in height. If your engine is below the waterline then it will get water even without a pump. If it is above the waterline the pump must make up the slight difference.

I have siphoned water almost completely out of tanks that are 14 feet tall, over the top! In fact we frequently install siphon breaks to prevent it from happening when we don't want it to. This is the reason for the 'vented loop' in the line from your head to the tank.

Gary H. Lucas

Gary H. Lucas
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  #30  
Old 09-24-2009
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Here in the Pacific Northwesr where we have a 9 ft tidal swing we use "grids" where we tie the boat up alongside a warf and let the tide go down so we can work on the under water part. They do this a lot in the UK and the current, October, issue of "Practical Boat Owner" (my wife gets a laugh over the contradiction) has a good how to do it article on it "How to dry out on piles".
I had a gate valve fail and replaces it on the grid. Expect Murphy's law it will inevidably not go as planned... wrong tools, stuck or frozen retainer nuts, wrong size replacement valve etc. Have a wood plug handy you hammer into the opening if you can't get the valve replaced before the tide comes up.
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