Which goop for bedding - SailNet Community
Reply
 
LinkBack Thread Tools
post #1 of 18 Old 10-12-2009 Thread Starter
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Feb 2002
Location: Oceanside CA
Posts: 788
Thanks: 19
Thanked 10 Times in 10 Posts
Rep Power: 14
 
Which goop for bedding

I have done my search here and figure 4200 would be best for bedding all my hardware and other upcoming projects.

As my first project I had drilled a hole below water line and installed a drain plug to clean out the bilge, its a trailerable boat. I have had trouble finding 4200 here in town. I had a huge 10 oz tube of 4200 the only size I could find locally. When reading the back of the tube it said, the tube should be used up within 24 hours of opening. I ended up just applying silicone and using screws to hold the drain, to fill the hole and will do it with an appropriate polyurethane when doing other projects coming up.

As my schedule has me away from home all day only to return late each evening, I was hoping to be able to come home and add install a few items each night if time and energy allows.. At this pace i will have to open a tube of 4200 each night then throw it away.

With this in mind I am looking to order a bunch of small tubes of 4200 to get this project going. I might get one long weekend day to do lots of these things at once but so far the weather has not cooperated and the season is nearing the end.

Is there another product that might be a suitable substitute for my needs say 3m 101 or Life-Calk? Or should I just order lots of small tubes of 4200? Is a primer recommended?

Thanks

Jordan
West Wight Potter 14 "Lemon Drop"
Oceanside CA
To view links or images in signatures your post count must be 10 or greater. You currently have 0 posts.
.
jephotog is offline  
Quote Quick Reply Share with Facebook
Sponsored Links
Advertisement
 
post #2 of 18 Old 10-12-2009
Tartan 27' owner
 
CalebD's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2008
Location: NYC
Posts: 4,784
Thanks: 5
Thanked 109 Times in 101 Posts
Rep Power: 8
 
Check defender.com for 3M 4200. They sell the smaller tubes. I find that they last quite a long time if properly capped after use. Sometimes you have to puncture the tube to get the stuff out though. For small projects don't get the caulking gun tubes as they're harder to re-seal.
Wipe surfaces with acetone prior to applying - no other primer needed.
Good luck.

"The cure for anything is salt water~ sweat, tears, or the sea." ~Isak Denesen

Everybody has one:

To view links or images in signatures your post count must be 10 or greater. You currently have 0 posts.
CalebD is offline  
Quote Quick Reply Share with Facebook
post #3 of 18 Old 10-12-2009
Special Delivery
 
speciald's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2007
Location: live on boat
Posts: 661
Thanks: 0
Thanked 0 Times in 0 Posts
Rep Power: 9
 
Send a message via Skype™ to speciald
Use LifeSeal insteadof 4200 or 5200.
speciald is offline  
Quote Quick Reply Share with Facebook
post #4 of 18 Old 10-12-2009 Thread Starter
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Feb 2002
Location: Oceanside CA
Posts: 788
Thanks: 19
Thanked 10 Times in 10 Posts
Rep Power: 14
 
Thanks Any idea of shelf life on these two products

I am going to order some of each and perform a test on the two different products. I know for a fact the life-seal has a fairly short expiration date on it in terms of a year or two while still in the tube. Does 4200 suffer this same fate?

If not I will just stock up on 4200.

Jordan
West Wight Potter 14 "Lemon Drop"
Oceanside CA
To view links or images in signatures your post count must be 10 or greater. You currently have 0 posts.
.
jephotog is offline  
Quote Quick Reply Share with Facebook
post #5 of 18 Old 10-12-2009
Telstar 28
 
sailingdog's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2006
Location: New England
Posts: 43,290
Thanks: 0
Thanked 15 Times in 12 Posts
Rep Power: 14
         
I'd recommend you read the primer on marine sealants I wrote a while back. Many sealants are moisture curing and will go bad shortly after being opened.

Sailingdog

To view links or images in signatures your post count must be 10 or greater. You currently have 0 posts.

Telstar 28
New England

You know what the first rule of sailing is? ...Love. You can learn all the math in the 'verse, but you take
a boat to the sea you don't love, she'll shake you off just as sure as the turning of the worlds. Love keeps
her going when she oughta fall down, tells you she's hurting 'fore she keens. Makes her a home.

—Cpt. Mal Reynolds, Serenity (edited)

If you're new to the Sailnet Forums... please read this
To view links or images in signatures your post count must be 10 or greater. You currently have 0 posts.
.

Still—DON'T READ THAT POST AGAIN.
sailingdog is offline  
Quote Quick Reply Share with Facebook
post #6 of 18 Old 10-12-2009
Senior Member
 
Maine Sail's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2003
Location: Maine Coast
Posts: 5,887
Thanks: 20
Thanked 222 Times in 169 Posts
Rep Power: 16
       
There is no need

There is no need to glue this stuff onto your boat. Adhesive sealants are one of the biggest scams this industry has succumbed to. 5200 is devils glue and 4200 is the devils little brothers glue.

4200 bonds at 300 PSI and can be a bear to remove at a later date. My boat is 30 year sold and was beded at the factory with butyl tape or butyl rubber. Butyl tape has a bond strength of about 10 PSI. 80% of the iofttings on my vessel still DO NOT leak even thirty years later. You do not need a glue..

3M 101 is a polysulfide that only adheres at about 130 PSI, still to much IMHO, and is a far better choice than 4200. EVERYTHING will eventually need to be re-bedded so why make future projects harder than they need to be?

BTW if you seal the tube well 4200 will NOT go bad in 24 hours..

Don't forget to countersink the bolt holes in the deck slightly..

______
-Maine Sail / CS-36T


To view links or images in signatures your post count must be 10 or greater. You currently have 0 posts.




© Images In Posts Property of Compass Marine Inc.


Maine Sail is offline  
Quote Quick Reply Share with Facebook
post #7 of 18 Old 10-13-2009
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Jan 2008
Posts: 149
Thanks: 0
Thanked 0 Times in 0 Posts
Rep Power: 8
 
ultraseal by 3M worked well for sealing the windows on my C@C 24. I used 5200 with little success. Just a suggestion.
ahab211 is offline  
Quote Quick Reply Share with Facebook
post #8 of 18 Old 10-13-2009
Member
 
Join Date: Dec 2008
Posts: 80
Thanks: 0
Thanked 0 Times in 0 Posts
Rep Power: 7
 
I used 3M UV4000

UV4000 is designed to bed metal to fiberglass. Rebedded most of my stanchion bases and deck hardware - no leaking and can be removed at a later date without a blow torch. The tube can be resealed without an issue. Have even used a year later without loss of cure or handling.

Andy
cruisingmom is offline  
Quote Quick Reply Share with Facebook
post #9 of 18 Old 10-13-2009
Senior Member
 
Maine Sail's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2003
Location: Maine Coast
Posts: 5,887
Thanks: 20
Thanked 222 Times in 169 Posts
Rep Power: 16
       
UV 4000 is a polyether product which does appear to have quite a long tube life. Though not as UV resistant as I'd like to see, it does seem to last a while in the tube and may be a good choice in the OP's area.

It should be noted that UV 4000 has the same bond strength as 4200 of about 300 PSI. I have seen 4200 tear the gelcoat from the substrate before so do be careful in the event that you do need to remove these products.

The marketers at 3M seem to call anything less strong that 5200 "easy to remove".... I guess when you compare 700 PSI to 300 PSI it does seem "easy"..

______
-Maine Sail / CS-36T


To view links or images in signatures your post count must be 10 or greater. You currently have 0 posts.




© Images In Posts Property of Compass Marine Inc.


Maine Sail is offline  
Quote Quick Reply Share with Facebook
post #10 of 18 Old 10-13-2009
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Aug 2006
Location: wherever
Posts: 5,283
Thanks: 8
Thanked 17 Times in 16 Posts
Rep Power: 12
     
Quote:
Originally Posted by jephotog View Post
I ended up just applying silicone and using screws to hold the drain, to fill the hole and will do it with an appropriate polyurethane when doing other projects coming up.

Silicone is extremely difficult to remove properly. It leaves a very fine residue that won't come off with acetone or caulk remover. You will have to sand down the areas where you have used silcone. Nothing else seems to work.
I suggest you never use silicone on your boat for anything
xort is offline  
Quote Quick Reply Share with Facebook
Reply

Quick Reply
Message:
Options

By choosing to post the reply above you agree to the rules you agreed to when joining Sailnet.
Click Here to view those rules.

Register Now



In order to be able to post messages on the SailNet Community forums, you must first register.
Please enter your desired user name, your email address and other required details in the form below.
Please note: After entering 3 characters a list of Usernames already in use will appear and the list will disappear once a valid Username is entered.


User Name:
Password
Please enter a password for your user account. Note that passwords are case-sensitive.

Password:


Confirm Password:
Email Address
Please enter a valid email address for yourself.

Email Address:
OR

Log-in









Human Verification

In order to verify that you are a human and not a spam bot, please enter the answer into the following box below based on the instructions contained in the graphic.




Currently Active Users Viewing This Thread: 1 (0 members and 1 guests)
 
Thread Tools
Show Printable Version Show Printable Version
Email this Page Email this Page



Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
Goop to use for gaskets on bronze ports sadie14 Gear & Maintenance 1 04-07-2004 09:42 AM

Posting Rules  
You may post new threads
You may post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is On
Trackbacks are On
Pingbacks are On
Refbacks are On

 
For the best viewing experience please update your browser to Google Chrome