Plan 'B' - SailNet Community

   Search Sailnet:

 forums  store  


Quick Menu
Forums           
Articles          
Galleries        
Boat Reviews  
Classifieds     
Search SailNet 
Boat Search (new)

Shop the
SailNet Store
Anchor Locker
Boatbuilding & Repair
Charts
Clothing
Electrical
Electronics
Engine
Hatches and Portlights
Interior And Galley
Maintenance
Marine Electronics
Navigation
Other Items
Plumbing and Pumps
Rigging
Safety
Sailing Hardware
Trailer & Watersports
Clearance Items

Advertise Here






Go Back   SailNet Community > On Board > Gear & Maintenance
 Not a Member? 
  #1  
Old 12-30-2009
UnlikelyVoyager's Avatar
Member
 
Join Date: Dec 2009
Posts: 94
Thanks: 0
Thanked 0 Times in 0 Posts
Rep Power: 5
UnlikelyVoyager is on a distinguished road
Plan 'B'

As Captain Cook knew, there's always a Plan B. Thus, when the wooden boat that Helena and I had been looking for for years, turned up on eBay, we suddenly needed a Plan B.

Plan A had been to "build the traditional dingy 'Cabin Boy' this winter so when and if we buy a wooden boat, I'll know how to take care of it." But the right boat came along sooner than we expected, and we now owned a boat. A boat in Florida -- about 2000 nm. from home. Clearly, Plan A wasn't going to cut it.

So we came up with Plan B: to sail the new boat home from Florida in stages. Stage 1, the north west coast of Florida to the south east coast of Florida, via the Keys, commencing in 20 days.

And that means this unhandy man needs to finish building my lapstrake dingy in 20 days...

Read complete blog post: Plan B

Enjoy: John
__________________
Check out my blog:
To view links or images in signatures your post count must be 10 or greater. You currently have 0 posts.
Reply With Quote Share with Facebook
  #2  
Old 12-31-2009
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Nov 2008
Location: Long Island
Posts: 2,129
Thanks: 1
Thanked 0 Times in 0 Posts
Rep Power: 6
WanderingStar is on a distinguished road
John, you bought the Gilmer Blue Moon that was just sold in Florida? Strip-planked? Congratulations! A charming boat. I've never sailed one (may not have seen one) But I spent six years sailing and cruising a 26' gaff yawl Friendship. I think you'll find her fun and handy, but very basic for cruising. Think camping, but with a tight roof and firm berth. I'll be in Fort Myers beach Jan 30-Feb6. Keep me posted, I'd love to see your boat, will help if I can. Where is your (home) destination?
Reply With Quote Share with Facebook
  #3  
Old 12-31-2009
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Nov 2008
Location: Long Island
Posts: 2,129
Thanks: 1
Thanked 0 Times in 0 Posts
Rep Power: 6
WanderingStar is on a distinguished road
Oh, and don't go crazy tying to finish the tender. Find a cheap canoe or glass dink in Fl on craigslist. There are several canoes there for $100.
Reply With Quote Share with Facebook
  #4  
Old 12-31-2009
Sabreman's Avatar
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Sep 2006
Location: Yeocomico River, VA
Posts: 1,585
Thanks: 2
Thanked 14 Times in 11 Posts
Rep Power: 9
Sabreman will become famous soon enough Sabreman will become famous soon enough
UnlikelyVoyager - What a great project even if it is in a somewhat compressed time schedule. How are you attaching the keel to the frames? By screws? I recommend silicone bronze. For added measure, you can epoxy (thicken first with silca), then screw.

How are you doing the transom? Plywood or sold wood like mahogany? If solid wood, and you need to glue up several pieces to get the width needed, you should start that glue now, before you get much further. If plywood, you should consider epoxy-ing the end grain to seal it. If plywood, I hope that it's marine grade.

I've done this job. PM me if you have any questions.
__________________
Sabre 38 "Victoria"

Last edited by Sabreman; 12-31-2009 at 11:27 AM.
Reply With Quote Share with Facebook
  #5  
Old 12-31-2009
CalebD's Avatar
Tartan 27' owner
 
Join Date: Jan 2008
Location: NYC
Posts: 4,515
Thanks: 4
Thanked 84 Times in 77 Posts
Rep Power: 7
CalebD will become famous soon enough
Well written blog and quite a stunner of a boat. Good luck finishing your tender 'Cabin Boy' in 20 days. You sound determined so I bet you will finish it in the allotted time. How were you planning to get your new tender down to Florida?
I have met WanderingStar (John) and he is a great guy with a real penchant for wooden boats. He brought his latest wooden boat ('68 Alden 39') back up to NY from FL recently. He makes a good point about getting a dink in FL.
I have been to ML Condon's lumber yard in White Plains. It is one pretty amazing place that seemed to have nearly every species of wood available.
If you find yourself traveling up the Hudson once you get up to the NY area be sure to stop in at the Nyack Boat Club (cheap transient moorings and great club).
Keep us posted on your first leg.
__________________
"The cure for anything is salt water~ sweat, tears, or the sea." ~Isak Denesen

Everybody has one:

To view links or images in signatures your post count must be 10 or greater. You currently have 0 posts.
Reply With Quote Share with Facebook
  #6  
Old 01-01-2010
UnlikelyVoyager's Avatar
Member
 
Join Date: Dec 2009
Posts: 94
Thanks: 0
Thanked 0 Times in 0 Posts
Rep Power: 5
UnlikelyVoyager is on a distinguished road
Thanks for all the encouragement, guys. I'm excited both about finishing "Cabin Boy", and having her with me to sail the Blue Moon home (in 4 or 5 stages... I'm not completely crazy!)

-- John
__________________
Check out my blog:
To view links or images in signatures your post count must be 10 or greater. You currently have 0 posts.
Reply With Quote Share with Facebook
  #7  
Old 01-01-2010
UnlikelyVoyager's Avatar
Member
 
Join Date: Dec 2009
Posts: 94
Thanks: 0
Thanked 0 Times in 0 Posts
Rep Power: 5
UnlikelyVoyager is on a distinguished road
Day 19: Stem Invention

What a difference a deadline makes. I've been puzzling over a build problem for several weeks now, without success. None of my boat building books has a solution. Even Clem Kuhlig's "Building the Skiff Cabin Boy" just skips over the problem.

Here's the problem: The backbone of the skiff consists of the stem in the front, the keelson along the bottom, and the transom in the back. The stem has to go from about where my hand is in the picture below, down to the leading edge of the ladder frame. What makes this complicated is that the angle and position of the stem is very important, and I knew I'd have to fool around with it a bit to get it right.

So how could I hold the stem in place in a way that was easily adjustable, but also very strong?

Read complete blog post: Stem Invention

Enjoy: John
__________________
Check out my blog:
To view links or images in signatures your post count must be 10 or greater. You currently have 0 posts.
Reply With Quote Share with Facebook
  #8  
Old 01-01-2010
UnlikelyVoyager's Avatar
Member
 
Join Date: Dec 2009
Posts: 94
Thanks: 0
Thanked 0 Times in 0 Posts
Rep Power: 5
UnlikelyVoyager is on a distinguished road
Day 18: Year of the Blue Moon

On this Day 18, my goal was to work on Cabin Boy's transom. I had bought a large plank of Mahogany from Condon's. It was a beautiful piece, but since I'd brought it home to my basement workshop, it had developed a nasty crack. The sudden change in humidity combined with a hidden weakness in the board, I suspect.

Luckily, I'd been smart enough to buy a longer length than I needed...

Read complete blog post: Year of the Blue Moon

Enjoy: John
__________________
Check out my blog:
To view links or images in signatures your post count must be 10 or greater. You currently have 0 posts.
Reply With Quote Share with Facebook
  #9  
Old 01-01-2010
CalebD's Avatar
Tartan 27' owner
 
Join Date: Jan 2008
Location: NYC
Posts: 4,515
Thanks: 4
Thanked 84 Times in 77 Posts
Rep Power: 7
CalebD will become famous soon enough
Quote:
Originally Posted by UnlikelyVoyager View Post
... I had bought a large plank of Mahogany from Condon's. It was a beautiful piece, but since I'd brought it home to my basement workshop, it had developed a nasty crack. The sudden change in humidity combined with a hidden weakness in the board, I suspect.
...
Enjoy: John
I am no engineer but I have worked with wood to know that each species has its own attributes that make it suitable or unsuitable for specific applications. One of the first chronometers was made almost entirely from wood of perhaps 25 different species of varying qualities ( Amazon.com: The Illustrated Longitude: The True Story of a Lone Genius Who Solved the Greatest Scientific Problem of His Time (9780802775931): Dava Sobel, William J. H. Andrewes: Books ).
Certain species of wood are more prone to splitting along the grain then others. Mahogany "is a medium textured wood with straight and even or interlocked grain. Heartwood is reddish brown to deep red." ( Amazon.com: The Complete Manual of Woodworking (9780679766117): Albert Jackson, David Day: Books
).
In many applications of woodworking it would seem that the use of smaller pieces laminated together to make up a bigger piece is better then using one large plank; think butcher block and even some boat tillers. While a nice single piece of mahogany will make a beautiful transom for your 'Cabin Boy' it may still be prone to the splitting you have experienced. Often times a piece that large is made up by joining together several smaller pieces by either using dowels or a 'biscuit joiner', gluing and clamping. Doing this will add a considerable amount of effort to produce the piece of work but often can yield a stronger product in the end.
A nicely varnished mahogany transom on your 'Cabin Boy' dinghy is going to look drop dead gorgeous when it is done.
Keep us posted.
__________________
"The cure for anything is salt water~ sweat, tears, or the sea." ~Isak Denesen

Everybody has one:

To view links or images in signatures your post count must be 10 or greater. You currently have 0 posts.
Reply With Quote Share with Facebook
  #10  
Old 01-01-2010
UnlikelyVoyager's Avatar
Member
 
Join Date: Dec 2009
Posts: 94
Thanks: 0
Thanked 0 Times in 0 Posts
Rep Power: 5
UnlikelyVoyager is on a distinguished road
Quote:
Originally Posted by CalebD View Post
In many applications of woodworking it would seem that the use of smaller pieces laminated together to make up a bigger piece is better then using one large plank; think butcher block and even some boat tillers. While a nice single piece of mahogany will make a beautiful transom for your 'Cabin Boy' it may still be prone to the splitting you have experienced. Often times a piece that large is made up by joining together several smaller pieces by either using dowels or a 'biscuit joiner', gluing and clamping. Doing this will add a considerable amount of effort to produce the piece of work but often can yield a stronger product in the end.
A nicely varnished mahogany transom on your 'Cabin Boy' dinghy is going to look drop dead gorgeous when it is done.
Keep us posted.
I gave this idea serious consideration when the board started splitting. I've been watching it for a couple weeks now, but it didn't split any further. With my accelerated schedule, I don't have time to split and re-glue, so I'm going to have to hope for the best. It will be reinforced by the planking, knees, etc., so hopefully it will be okay. Otherwise, I can always unscrew it and re-do it.... one of the benefits of living a glueless life
__________________
Check out my blog:
To view links or images in signatures your post count must be 10 or greater. You currently have 0 posts.
Reply With Quote Share with Facebook
Reply


Currently Active Users Viewing This Thread: 1 (0 members and 1 guests)
 
Thread Tools

 
Posting Rules
You may post new threads
You may post replies
You may post attachments
You may edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is On


Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
Tashiba 40- Help Me Plan Re-Fit mrybas Gear & Maintenance 13 05-24-2011 11:53 AM
My 3-5 Year Plan toward the Cruising Life ChrisJuricich Cruising & Liveaboard Forum 62 02-03-2011 01:46 PM
Questions on my Cruising Plan Telesailor Cruising & Liveaboard Forum 12 10-16-2009 01:04 PM
Learning To Sail Plan capnsamuels Learning to Sail 11 12-09-2006 04:08 PM
Cruiser's Medical Plan Randy Harman Seamanship Articles 0 08-18-2003 08:00 PM


All times are GMT -4. The time now is 01:50 AM.

Add to My Yahoo!         
Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.7
Copyright ©2000 - 2014, vBulletin Solutions, Inc.
SEO by vBSEO 3.6.1
(c) Marine.com LLC 2000-2012

The SailNet.com store is owned and operated by a company independent of the SailNet.com forum. You are now leaving the SailNet forum. Click OK to continue or Cancel to return to the SailNet forum.