Causes of repair nightmares - Page 2 - SailNet Community

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  #11  
Old 02-05-2010
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Quote:
Originally Posted by davidpm View Post
5. Unprofessional repairs
It's often more trouble to undo the bad repair than to do it right the first time.
Example: 5200 where is doesn't belong. Bathtub caulk

I'm interested in any repairs you did that cost too much or took too long and why.
All repairs take longer than I would like but am getting better at that. I just guess at how long and then 10x that time and while it sometimes takes longer most times it doesn't.

BUT the #1 repair problem, by far, is dealing with those repairs or upgrades that were done by "professionals" who were paid top dollar, often thousands of dollars.

These "professionals" often come recommended but I have concluded that many recommendations are based on kickbacks, or ignorance.

The reason these repairs take so long is the time and money spent on them in the first place and then the time to redo the work at least enough to find all the flaws that needed fixing. And of course they often do very permanet damage because it was faster easier for them and to heck with the boat.

It is much better to avoid hiring professionals (sometimes we have to). The number one reason for this is that they are not on your boat when it sinks due to their work. The other reasons include lack of training, lack of interest, lack of time and lack of skills, all something an owner can address.

There is no doubt the POs or even COs (current owners) do crap work but they do not have the experience to hide their poor work and of course I have no problem if they kill themselves.

As for buying used boats and blaming the PO….well that feels like blaming the equipment. A good inspection will show poor PO workmanship and nothing drives down the price like poor work done by the owner.

Poor work done by the "professionals" often looks good, drives up the price, and can result in a failure in the middle of the gulf, filling the bilge with water and overheating the engine at the same time!
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  #12  
Old 02-05-2010
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I'd agree with this completely. Peter Kennedy Yacht Services royally screwed up the electrical system on my boat...

Quote:
Originally Posted by Architeuthis View Post
All repairs take longer than I would like but am getting better at that. I just guess at how long and then 10x that time and while it sometimes takes longer most times it doesn't.

BUT the #1 repair problem, by far, is dealing with those repairs or upgrades that were done by "professionals" who were paid top dollar, often thousands of dollars.

These "professionals" often come recommended but I have concluded that many recommendations are based on kickbacks, or ignorance.

The reason these repairs take so long is the time and money spent on them in the first place and then the time to redo the work at least enough to find all the flaws that needed fixing. And of course they often do very permanet damage because it was faster easier for them and to heck with the boat.

It is much better to avoid hiring professionals (sometimes we have to). The number one reason for this is that they are not on your boat when it sinks due to their work. The other reasons include lack of training, lack of interest, lack of time and lack of skills, all something an owner can address.

There is no doubt the POs or even COs (current owners) do crap work but they do not have the experience to hide their poor work and of course I have no problem if they kill themselves.

As for buying used boats and blaming the PO….well that feels like blaming the equipment. A good inspection will show poor PO workmanship and nothing drives down the price like poor work done by the owner.

Poor work done by the "professionals" often looks good, drives up the price, and can result in a failure in the middle of the gulf, filling the bilge with water and overheating the engine at the same time!
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  #13  
Old 02-05-2010
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In defense of us professionals, the jobs that turn to nightmares the fastest are ones that started with a dock neighbor offering their advice/assistance asking only a beer or six for their expertise. If you need to hire a professional, then hire one.[ not some actor that plays one on the dock] The shadetree boat repair guys give us all a bad name. It's always easier to sort out the b.s.ers from the experienced when the job gets done on paper first.
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Measure twice, cut once... Or measure everything twice, buy once!

I'm redoing the hoses from seacock to strainer, to seafrost cooler to engine seawater pump. I checked one of the fittings and it was 1". Ordered a sea strainer and hoses. When I tried to fit the hose, it wouldn't fit...some of the fittings are 1", some are 1 1/8" and some are 1 1/4". Now I have to figure out which size to standardize and get adapters where necessary.
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I'd say creating your own repairs ... the tedious ones ... simply because the PO couldn't handle the simple but important elements. Deck fittings mounted with ... the _smallest_ washers possible and no lock washers on the hardware. Any job involving sealant and adjoining surfaces (deck fittings, portlights, faucets) and they couldn't simply smooth the bead with a wet finger... Searching for all the electrical accessories that were wired with bare wires twisted together and electrical taped ...

I'm very adept at repairs ... fixing the POs failed repairs takes the longest ... because they tend to be numerous.
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Quote:
Originally Posted by xort View Post
Measure twice, cut once... Or measure everything twice, buy once!

I'm redoing the hoses from seacock to strainer, to seafrost cooler to engine seawater pump. I checked one of the fittings and it was 1". Ordered a sea strainer and hoses. When I tried to fit the hose, it wouldn't fit...some of the fittings are 1", some are 1 1/8" and some are 1 1/4". Now I have to figure out which size to standardize and get adapters where necessary.
Just remember that, in this case, larger is not always better. If your equipment can support adapting a 1 1/4" down to a 1" ... then you only have the possibility of a 1" (vice 1 1/4") seawater leak in the future.
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Architeuthis View Post
There is no doubt the POs or even COs (current owners) do crap work but they do not have the experience to hide their poor work and of course I have no problem if they kill themselves.
That reminds me of a tip a rigger shared with me.
He said that if he sees something that is supposed to be screwed to the mast, pad eye, spreader base, shroud tang etc., he looks closely at the screws. If they all look the same without buggering they are probably original and depending on the age of the boat will probably not come out. If some are newer than others he has found it very common that the new one is really just a head 5200'ed into the hole to cover a twisted off screw. Or it could be the other way around where the new one was good but the buggered ones were dummies.

He has to estimate jobs and gets pretty good of seeing the land mines after doing a dozen tickets a day for years.
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To my list I would like to add bad weather or temperature. We often don't have the option of putting the boat in a heated shed and that makes the job a lot harder and sometimes fails.
If someone would invent a varnish that could be applied in the rain or snow it would be a best seller.
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Old 02-05-2010
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PO'd

My PO glued the portlight frames to the inside of the bulkhead, to make sure all the incoming water was routed through the inside of the paneling, and when i tried to pry off the frame, rip goes the paneling. Really, butyl tape is the only thing i feel has business bedding screwed-down window frames, and barring that sika or silicone, not some adhesive to put one in a destructive frenzy of pushing and prying.

Electrical tape was used to bump up the size on a hose fitting adapter.

My cable from shore power to breaker was too light gauge, with spade connectors instead of ring.

The last two weren't so bad, the real nightmare is when my shore power plug started smoking, and I still don't know the culprit there, as it'd turned to ash and shorted when i figured out what went on. Perhaps the terminal or prongs were corroded.
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