How to tension forestay - Page 2 - SailNet Community

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  #11  
Old 02-10-2010
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I do have an adjustable split backstay, and double lower shrouds.
With the back stay relaxed howmuch deflection should I have in the headstay?
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Quote:
Originally Posted by svobsession View Post
I do have an adjustable split backstay, and double lower shrouds.
With the back stay relaxed howmuch deflection should I have in the headstay?
It needn't be sloppy, (do you have a furler? I'm guessing not) but I wouldn't be alarmed if you could deflect it by hand a few inches or more with the backstay off, and much less, of course, with it tensioned.

Be sure it's not inducing any reverse pre-bend, then let the backstay apply the sailing tension and mast bend you need.

btw - who's preparing the new stay (ie cutting it to length and swaging terminals? You should use a rigger for this and they will have a good idea of how to set things up. Also, if things are good now you can use the normal setting for the old stay as a guide for the overall length.
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I had a local rigging shop make the new stay and swag the terminals.
The old stay had mismatched terminals and the turn buckle was out of adjustment room (bottomed out). I do have a furler. I Installed the stay and the furler. I eye balled the tension, the boat hasnt been out yet with the the new stay or furler.
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The tension on the forestay should be applied by tightening the backstay. You adjust the length of the forestay and backstay primarily to create the proper rake in the mast. The proper rake is that which provides minimal weather helm.

When the boat is at rest there can be little or no tension on the forestay...depends on whether you have an adjustable backstay. At rest you release the adjuster. Adjuster or not, adjust the backstay so there is adequate tension to minimize luff sag ubder upwind load, to say 6" on a 50' luff.
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Fractional

Quote:
Originally Posted by Gary M View Post
Sorry tager but it is the other way around. A fractional rig will have less forestay tension than a mast head rig with the same back stay tension.
On a masthead rig the back stay pulls directly on the attachment point of the forestay and tensions it.
This is also true for a fractional rig with swept back spreaders and no backstay, the upper shrouds are attached at the same point as the forestay and pull the mast aft, so I might assume that mast bend is induced by the lower shrouds which are attached at the spreader in this case.

With a fractional rig, the back stay pulls the top of the mast back but the forestay being attached farther down the mast does not see as much tension. You generally will get more mast bend on the fractional however.
Which way should mast bend be directed? With her belly pushing forward or her behind pushing aft?
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