Wood, Diesel or propane bulkhead heating stove? - Page 10 - SailNet Community
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post #91 of 181 Old 08-24-2011
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Enclosed combustion regardless of type of fuel, is generally safer, and it also requires, as in 'must have', gas tight venting to the outside to safely dispose of combustion gases. Without gas tight venting it is as dangerous as any other type of heating; ALL heating systems must have this. Power venting may be needed, with an interlock to turn off the fuel if the fan stops running.

Diesel fuel is safer because it has a much lower flammability, both as liquid and vapour, than other fuels (except perhaps coal).

Combine these two considerations and you have a relatively safer system. "Relatively safer" because you still have to maintain it leak proof from both fuel and combustion gas.

As always, make-up air for the air burned in combustion and exhausted with the combustion gas, has to be provided - don't close you boat up airtight, or flames will eventually go out... and you might be suffering from lack of oxygen! (Remember the high school experiment of the candle burning under the inverted drinking glass?)
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post #92 of 181 Old 08-24-2011
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Wise and clear words Knotted. With regard to the combustion air, Wallas at least do two models that duct this from outside, and you can chose to bring circulation air from outside.
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post #93 of 181 Old 08-24-2011
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Dickenson's Newport propane 'fireplaces' have a fully sealed combustion chamber (provided you close the gasketed door once lit) and draw combustion air down a double flue. They are T/C protected and offer a safe, much less expensive/easier install than forced air systems.

They are not as effective as ducted forced air, but they are a less costly, equally safe option.

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".. there is much you could do at sea with common sense.. and very little you could do without it.."
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post #94 of 181 Old 08-24-2011
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The Dickensen type Vs the forced air diesel burners is probably not a clear argument and I guess it is important to weigh up all the differences. The two things that are a clear difference though is that the forced air Wallas/Webasto/Eberspacher have much smaller flues between 1 and 2", and there is no diesel smell.

The diesel smell is a common comment I get. The other thing that I am increasingly getting is a desire to abandon LPG (Propane) both for the explosion fear and the problem of it's tendency to increase the cabin humidity - in the case of open flame and radiant burners.
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post #95 of 181 Old 08-24-2011
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We have a Dickinson propane "fireplace" and it provides sufficient heat down to about 3C on our C27. I'd prefer a diesel heater but thats probably for the next boat. The only problem I have had is that occasionally the fan will blow the fire out and you need to re-light it. We typically go out for day sails or overnight. If living aboard this would not be my choice of heating system.
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post #96 of 181 Old 08-28-2011
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Good Information on this topic. I live on the Calif Delta, and if I plan on extended cruizing I will exit the"Gate" and turn left. Locally here if it's so cold, I bundle up (hate doing that), and have a small electrical heater to take the edge off. My house batteries are 4 group27 deep cycle marine batteries. I plan on solar panals and a wind generator.
All that mostly cures the fear of toxic gas buildup. That brings me to my point, I use propane on deck for the BBQ, so no prob there. In the Galley, I use CNG. It was on the boat when I purchased her. I did some research, and it seems to be the safest of fuels (lighter than air), and was just wondering if anyone has researched this for a heater/fake fireplace.
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post #97 of 181 Old 10-29-2011
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Hi for what its worth I have a small Morso coal stove its great, you can store the coal anywhere,wet does not bother it and if you burn anthracite its clean and long burning and safe. also the stove will burn wood if you want.

Last edited by wooden; 10-29-2011 at 02:18 PM.
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post #98 of 181 Old 10-29-2011
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I see a lot of advantages in coal over wood. Note the 2 just mentioned--more heat per unit, so easier storage and less weight, and no bugs.
Coal burns cleaner and safer--less ash and no creosote, so not the risk of chimney fires. That last point is a huge plus.
Coal doesn't need to be stored for months to dry. Unseasoned wood will not produce nearly as much heat as seasoned wood.
You don't have to cut/split it to a size that fits your stove. Most wood you buy or scrounge won't fit as you find it. Also, most scrap or drift wood you find is apt to be old lumber, and coniferous, so less dense and less efficient than hardwood.
I've been burning wood for heat for years. There are good reasons why everybody switched to coal as soon as it became widely available hundred and fifty years ago. I'd switch in a minute if I didn't have lots of trees and a good chainsaw.
And I have neither trees nor a chainsaw on my boat.
JV
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post #99 of 181 Old 10-30-2011
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Here a picture of my coal stove on the boat, you can get smaller ones.
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post #100 of 181 Old 10-30-2011
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Sweet!
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