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  #31  
Old 03-07-2010
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Quote:
Originally Posted by degreeoff View Post
I am debating wethet to make my own wood stove for my Cat 30. It would be easy enough and I have the tooling to make a nice stainless one here at my house. I would (wood) want it for the off season months as well and do not live aboard or anything. I know much about wood burning as it is my primary heat sorce in my 3500 sq ft home (with oil as a backup) and just love the radiant heat!

josh
This is exactly what I have been thinking about doing for quite some time. A liveaboard neighbor of mine enrolled in a community college "intro to welding course". As their end of class project they had to make something. He made his stove. It turned out quite well, not an art piece, but very functional. In total it cost him about $250 in tuition and special matereals (like the glass and gasket) and he got to use all their tools equipment etc. Also at the end of all of it he ended up with a useful skill.


Another type of heat I have been dreaming up when the engineering part of my mind is bored is a hydronic system with circulating hot water and radiators just like a webasto system, except instead of a webasto generating the heat, what about using a small diesel genset? This would of course take up far more space than a webasto and likely use more fuel, and be louder, but if your boat has large power demands, or if you already have a genset, you could use it's coolant to heat your boat. There is lots of existing hardware out there to convert engine coolant into heat, such as red-dot heaters or even car heater parts.

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  #32  
Old 03-07-2010
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I'm considering using my propane oven for heat. If I vent it from the burners (cover two, vent one) out the hatch or portlight, I shouldn't add moisture. The rest of the heat should warm the cabin, and I won't have to add any gear, or take up space.
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Quote:
Originally Posted by WanderingStar View Post
I'm considering using my propane oven for heat. If I vent it from the burners (cover two, vent one) out the hatch or portlight, I shouldn't add moisture. The rest of the heat should warm the cabin, and I won't have to add any gear, or take up space.
I looked at that but here is the catch. Venting removes the heat.

So you want to put something over the burners that is going to be heated and then radiates that heat.

I did a quick design and ended up with something that was quite sizable, had some weight to it and some complexity as I didn't want to use cabin air for combustion air.

I decided to go with hydronic but I'm not sure why there are not more heat adapters out there other than they do have to be custom fitted and of course like all heaters make a mistake and everyone in the cabin dies....
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  #34  
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Quote:
Originally Posted by WanderingStar View Post
I'm considering using my propane oven for heat. If I vent it from the burners (cover two, vent one) out the hatch or portlight, I shouldn't add moisture. The rest of the heat should warm the cabin, and I won't have to add any gear, or take up space.
Yeah, it'll work but not all that well. I have one of these on my boat, which, when you look at it, is just a vented propane stove burner for $500. It will heat up 1/2 of my 41' boat in the spring, or fall. Waste of money and space if you ask me. In fact, the flame isn't even protected and once the cat set her tail on fire with this thing!



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Originally Posted by Architeuthis View Post
I looked at that but here is the catch. Venting removes the heat.


I decided to go with hydronic but I'm not sure why there are not more heat adapters out there other than they do have to be custom fitted and of course like all heaters make a mistake and everyone in the cabin dies....
I have a CO detector on board.
I thought I would put metal plates over two burners, and a vent from the third. The heat should be conveyed through the sides and top of the oven, and the plates, even the stack. I have found that using the oven warms the cabin. I don't plan to use this for freezing temps, just the occasional cool night. What kind of oven were you using? How did you vent it? I figured maybe 3" pipe.
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Someone probably already mentioned this, but I think the classic solution to radiating heat from a burner is putting a clay flower pot over it.

I used oil lamps this year and they really take the edge off of a cool evening.
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Quote:
Originally Posted by MedSailor View Post
Yeah, it'll work but not all that well. I have one of these on my boat, which, when you look at it, is just a vented propane stove burner for $500. It will heat up 1/2 of my 41' boat in the spring, or fall. Waste of money and space if you ask me. In fact, the flame isn't even protected and once the cat set her tail on fire with this thing!



Medsailor

Ahhhh. Now that explains your earlier comment "propane heat sucks".

Yes, that kind of propane heat does suck.

But what you have is nothing at all like the propane heaters offered by Dickinson in the Newport line. Completely different animal.

Yours is just a re-badged galley stove burner, with an "open air" chimney stack.

Not only that, they are not rated to heat a boat anywhere near the size of yours. Can't blame the heater for that.
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Originally Posted by WanderingStar View Post
I have a CO detector on board.
I thought I would put metal plates over two burners, and a vent from the third. The heat should be conveyed through the sides and top of the oven, and the plates, even the stack. I have found that using the oven warms the cabin. I don't plan to use this for freezing temps, just the occasional cool night. What kind of oven were you using? How did you vent it? I figured maybe 3" pipe.
Unless the burner element is in a sealed combustion chamber, you will end up with a lot of moisture in the cabin, just like Medsail's unit.

You may not notice the moisture so much when cooking. Even when you're running the oven, it's generally for a relatively brief period of time. With heaters, you are running them for hours and hours and hours. If you do the same with the oven/stove, you will have high humidity in the cabin space. With the cold outside temp, pretty soon the moisture will be condensing on the cool cabinsides, and in no time you'll have a rainforest.
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Quote:
Originally Posted by WanderingStar View Post
I have a CO detector on board.
I thought I would put metal plates over two burners, and a vent from the third. The heat should be conveyed through the sides and top of the oven, and the plates, even the stack. I have found that using the oven warms the cabin. I don't plan to use this for freezing temps, just the occasional cool night. What kind of oven were you using? How did you vent it? I figured maybe 3" pipe.
Sounds like a clay pot might do the trick for occasional cool nights.


My design was based on heat exchangers that transferred heat to air which is all it would really be. I had the whole top of the stove, encased. Mine is square, steel and easy to cover. Thick aluminum plates would be across the top of each burner a several inches above the flame (actual distance and flame setting would be determined in testing). The plates would angle up toward the middle so the hot exhaust gases would rise and combine then hit other plates which would direct the gases through a 3" insulated duct to the portlight or the hatch directly above.

The main part would look like a box about 12” high sitting on the top of the stove. Most of it would be made of flat bar aluminum including fins on the outside over which fans would blow cabin air. I think I would end up using a heat shield so people could fall against it or grab it for support and to direct the heat to the center of the cabin.

A fun project that can be done with basic tools but not one I wanted to do on the boat though I still think about it. The advantages were cost. A few hundred dollars buys a lot of scrap flat bar (none of the pieces are longer than 2’), it uses outside air for combustion air, exhausts through an already existing hole in the deck and can break down for storage. It also collected water, not that I would drink it.

But still not as nice as Hydronic. Hydronic is crazy expensive and much harder to install than making a heat exchanger for the stove but it is push button easy to use and doesn’t preclude having coffee in the morning!
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Is anyone familiar with these? I have seen them on a couple Friendship Sloops (my "someday..." boat). Cropped this image from an ad.

I like how they look classic.. I'm wondering if they work well to take the edge off of a chill.

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