Wood, Diesel or propane bulkhead heating stove? - Page 9 - SailNet Community

   Search Sailnet:

 forums  store  


Quick Menu
Forums           
Articles          
Galleries        
Boat Reviews  
Classifieds     
Search SailNet 
Boat Search (new)

Shop the
SailNet Store
Anchor Locker
Boatbuilding & Repair
Charts
Clothing
Electrical
Electronics
Engine
Hatches and Portlights
Interior And Galley
Maintenance
Marine Electronics
Navigation
Other Items
Plumbing and Pumps
Rigging
Safety
Sailing Hardware
Trailer & Watersports
Clearance Items

Advertise Here






Go Back   SailNet Community > On Board > Gear & Maintenance
 Not a Member? 


Like Tree14Likes
Reply
 
LinkBack Thread Tools
  #81  
Old 12-30-2010
mitiempo's Avatar
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Sep 2008
Location: Victoria B.C. Canada
Posts: 7,071
Thanks: 0
Thanked 68 Times in 59 Posts
Rep Power: 7
mitiempo will become famous soon enough mitiempo will become famous soon enough
You're correct, the on demand water heaters are a big issue with insurance companies and surveyors. But propane heaters like the Dickinson with a vented stack are not a problem as long as the normal propane regs are followed.
Attached Thumbnails
Wood, Diesel or propane bulkhead heating stove?-1.jpg  
__________________
Brian
Living aboard in Victoria Harbour
Reply With Quote Share with Facebook
  #82  
Old 01-12-2011
sailingdog's Avatar
Telstar 28
 
Join Date: Mar 2006
Location: New England
Posts: 43,291
Thanks: 0
Thanked 9 Times in 9 Posts
Rep Power: 13
sailingdog is just really nice sailingdog is just really nice sailingdog is just really nice sailingdog is just really nice sailingdog is just really nice
Hope you have a good CO detector installed..
Quote:
Originally Posted by chrisncate View Post
Here is our new heater:









The Davey Hotpot Stove

Have not installed it yet, but after seeing it in person I have no doubt that it will work really well. I'll update as I go...
Elegua likes this.
__________________
Sailingdog

To view links or images in signatures your post count must be 10 or greater. You currently have 0 posts.

Telstar 28
New England

You know what the first rule of sailing is? ...Love. You can learn all the math in the 'verse, but you take
a boat to the sea you don't love, she'll shake you off just as sure as the turning of the worlds. Love keeps
her going when she oughta fall down, tells you she's hurting 'fore she keens. Makes her a home.

—Cpt. Mal Reynolds, Serenity (edited)

If you're new to the Sailnet Forums... please read this
To view links or images in signatures your post count must be 10 or greater. You currently have 0 posts.
.

Still—DON'T READ THAT POST AGAIN.
Reply With Quote Share with Facebook
  #83  
Old 03-08-2011
Abbott 22
 
Join Date: Feb 2011
Location: south western Ontario, Canada
Posts: 59
Thanks: 0
Thanked 0 Times in 0 Posts
Rep Power: 4
knotted is on a distinguished road
Furnace efficiency dissertation... long

I work in real estate, doing for buildings and houses what surveyors do for boats and their buyers. So I have a little insight into furnaces, and by extension, boat heaters. After all, a boat heater is but a miniature furnace

Fuel is simply an energy source; fuel going into a heater/furnace has a specific energy content, measured in BTUs per: lb, gallon, litre, cu. ft. or cu. M, or what have you. The heater/furnace is designed to consume fuel at a nominal rate, measured in lbs, gallons, litres, cu. ft. or cu. M, etc, usually per hour. Specific energy content times flow rate gives the energy input per hour. You can determine the specific energy content of your fuel of choice for comparison with other fuels. You can calculate how much fuel you need to consume in an hour to get a particular heat output (without regard for energy conversion efficiency - your actual consumption will be higher) Calculating your heat needs, though, is a whole, different animal!

Combustion isn’t 100 percent efficient; some unburned fuel escapes with the combustion products or gases. Conversion by the heat exchanger of heat energy in the flame to usable heat energy outside the furnace/heater is also not 100% efficient, the exhausted combustion gases aren’t at room temperature. If they were at room temperature a venting fan would be needed to draw them out of the combustion chamber; the fan becoming an energy charge against the system. The energy for the distribution fan in a forced air system should also be considered to get the overall energy picture.

In a domestic furnace an efficiency of about 90% to 92% is good and not expensive, and efficiency of about 96% is achievable with present technology (2011) but about twice as expensive. I never advise getting the 96% efficient furnace because the payback period from the savings in the gas cost is way too long to be worthwhile, at present natural gas prices. The 90% to 92% furnace pays for itself quite quickly if you're upgrading from say 65% efficiency.

So the heat energy equation becomes:
Energy in less lost energy from unburned fuel less lost energy in hot combustion gas exhaust = energy out
Fans have an energy cost but not in terms of the combustion fuel.

The efficiency of the heater/furnace is the energy input/energy output times 100 percent. This number seems to be never quoted by heater suppliers or manufacturers. It should be based on actual testing in accordance with specific standards.

It is somewhat of a cop-out to quote a rated heat output and a fuel consumption rate without a standard against which it is measured, although comparison between heaters can be made on the basis of fuel consumption for heaters rated at the same output, and if you can trust the manufacturer's figures. But this won’t let you accurately compare a heater rated at 3,000 BTU per hour with one rated at say 4,000 BTU per hour.

Re the Platinum Cat Heater, as it's based on radiant heating, its effect is limited to line of sight, although possibly a water filled heat exchanger (copper tubes in front of the catalytic bed but not covering it totally, connected to a pump and radiator(s)…) could carry say half the heat output elsewhere, leading you to double the heater size...
Quote:
Originally Posted by sailingdog
Somehow, I seriously doubt that they can vent all the combustion by products through a 1.5" hose
Modern furnaces of high efficiency have induced draft or pressure venting fans to exhaust combustion gases. The exhaust gases for a condensing furnace are nearly at room temperature and are typically piped with ABS plastic of about 1˝ inch diameter for a furnace with capacity of say 75,000 BTU or more. They are often sealed systems with inlet piping to bring in fresh combustion air from outside. Sealed systems are safer. I wouldn’t see any difficulty in handling the exhaust gases from a heater of say a tenth of that size with 1˝ inch diameter pipe and a properly sized exhaust blower, as the Platinum Cat Heater states it has.

In summary, and I hope this likely too lengthy explanation has been of some value,
  • Fuel consumption rate comparison can only be made between heaters of the same rated output, and then only based on 'trusted' figures from the manufacturer.
  • Manufacturers should provide efficiency figures, based on standard testing, for comparison purposes between brands and sizes of heater.
  • You personal choice of heater is just that, your personal choice. There's no getting around it!
  • and lastly, ALWAYS, ALWAYS have in the same compartment as the heater a battery operated CO detector, check the batteries regularly and change them as needed.
Reply With Quote Share with Facebook
  #84  
Old 07-14-2011
Member
 
Join Date: Jun 2007
Posts: 31
Thanks: 0
Thanked 0 Times in 0 Posts
Rep Power: 0
tankersteve is on a distinguished road
Boat heat

I was wondering about coal as a fuel source. It was mentioned once or twice in the 8+ pages of this thread, but no one really addressed it as a realistic (or not) fuel.

Does it share the problems of wood? It seems it would have higher BTUs per pound vice wood. Obviously, it could be messier. And it may be hard to find in say, the Caribbean, but may be a good alternative in northern Europe.

Anyway, just looking for some thoughts or experiences, and if anyone has pics of a marine coal-stove.

Tankersteve
Reply With Quote Share with Facebook
  #85  
Old 07-14-2011
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Nov 2008
Location: Long Island
Posts: 2,129
Thanks: 1
Thanked 0 Times in 0 Posts
Rep Power: 6
WanderingStar is on a distinguished road
A friend uses a Navigator to burn coal, it works fine and he likes it. But it isn't small, it's a cookstove too.
Reply With Quote Share with Facebook
  #86  
Old 07-14-2011
Tim R.'s Avatar
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Mar 2003
Location: Portland, Maine
Posts: 1,541
Thanks: 1
Thanked 27 Times in 26 Posts
Rep Power: 12
Tim R. is on a distinguished road
I would have to think that diesel is the best all around fuel. Efficient and obtainable anywhere in the world. Why would you want to carry a bucket of coal or wood around? It does not store efficiently and is heavy.

And a heater named "hotspot" I would avoid like the plague!

I believe in being comfortable. Living aboard in Maine is a pleasure with our Diesel hydronic heater. I can go almost all winter on our tankage(210 gal) and it warms the entire boat(by zone) evenly. And it also can provide engine pre-heating and on-demand HW.
__________________
Tim R.
Out cruising
1997 Caliber 40LRC

To view links or images in signatures your post count must be 10 or greater. You currently have 0 posts.

-----------------------------------------------------
Reply With Quote Share with Facebook
  #87  
Old 07-15-2011
Member
 
Join Date: Jun 2007
Posts: 31
Thanks: 0
Thanked 0 Times in 0 Posts
Rep Power: 0
tankersteve is on a distinguished road
So no signficant advantages over wood? Seems like it might store better/smaller and have better heat, as well as being a truly dry heat source.

Obviously not on par with diesel for ease of use, availability, etc, but perhaps has a role in blending romance of wood with real output.

Tankersteve
Reply With Quote Share with Facebook
  #88  
Old 07-15-2011
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Nov 2008
Location: Long Island
Posts: 2,129
Thanks: 1
Thanked 0 Times in 0 Posts
Rep Power: 6
WanderingStar is on a distinguished road
A quick search showed that coal has about 40% more btu than wood. While I love the idea of coal and wood stoves, I will keep using propane for cooking. Also for heat if I install it. Small wood stoves are inexpensive to buy, but may not withstand the heat of coal.
Reply With Quote Share with Facebook
  #89  
Old 07-15-2011
Tim R.'s Avatar
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Mar 2003
Location: Portland, Maine
Posts: 1,541
Thanks: 1
Thanked 27 Times in 26 Posts
Rep Power: 12
Tim R. is on a distinguished road
Wood can bring pests aboard.

We use electronic candles for the romance factor. They work great in the cockpit enclosure too.
__________________
Tim R.
Out cruising
1997 Caliber 40LRC

To view links or images in signatures your post count must be 10 or greater. You currently have 0 posts.

-----------------------------------------------------
Reply With Quote Share with Facebook
  #90  
Old 08-24-2011
Junior Member
 
Join Date: Jun 2011
Posts: 11
Thanks: 0
Thanked 0 Times in 0 Posts
Rep Power: 0
Markathishome is on a distinguished road
Diesel is safe, if it is a Wallas, Webasto or Eberspacher, as they are all enclosed burn. - No diesel smell, no matches, no soot, dry heat inside, no carbon monoxide if you run them overnight with hatches closed - you cannot do this with any other type of heater with hatches closed or overnight. Anything with an open flame is dangerous in a boat because of the multiple explosion risks, carbon monoxide buildup. Even the Dickensen style explodes if not treated right - look hard enough on other forums and you will see stories of explosions and gas poisonings on this type and propane.
Reply With Quote Share with Facebook
Reply


Currently Active Users Viewing This Thread: 1 (0 members and 1 guests)
 
Thread Tools

 
Posting Rules
You may post new threads
You may post replies
You may post attachments
You may edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is On


Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
Are you scared of wood? CharlieCobra General Discussion (sailing related) 35 04-05-2010 02:32 PM
Propane or Alcohol Stove? bsfree General Discussion (sailing related) 61 03-08-2010 09:42 PM
How to connect American propane line to European stove faithab General Discussion (sailing related) 3 05-25-2006 04:29 PM
portable propane stove rbtpfe9 Gear & Maintenance 11 11-02-2004 02:58 PM
Refilling Propane Tanks Doreen Gounard Gear and Maintenance Articles 0 09-01-2003 08:00 PM


All times are GMT -4. The time now is 02:05 PM.

Add to My Yahoo!         
Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.7
Copyright ©2000 - 2014, vBulletin Solutions, Inc.
SEO by vBSEO 3.6.1
(c) Marine.com LLC 2000-2012

The SailNet.com store is owned and operated by a company independent of the SailNet.com forum. You are now leaving the SailNet forum. Click OK to continue or Cancel to return to the SailNet forum.