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  #11  
Old 03-01-2010
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If it isn't rotten yet, and you aren't going offshore. Just leave it alone. Maybe try the dehumidifier. Re coring would be foolish as the core is still good.

Last edited by tager; 03-01-2010 at 11:28 AM.
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Old 03-01-2010
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I am dealing with a wet plywood core right now

1. I have had one 8" X 12" section of wood out of the boat for a week it is NOT getting dry

2. There are many areas on my boat that while damp are BEST left alone as there is no delamination of the wood OR the inner and outer glass ,even the worst wood is still intact BUT is not bonded to the glass causing flex


3. In my case i have to work inside as the inner skin is REALLY thin
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  #13  
Old 03-01-2010
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While worth a shot, I'd point out that this will likely only dry out the innermost layers of the plywood and that the uppermost layers will still be damp and rotting... The brown water you've been seeing is generally a sign of the wood rotting.

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Originally Posted by laHolland View Post
That's a good idea, Rosa. I think I will try that first, and then reevaluate.
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Old 03-01-2010
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You can find industrial grade masks and respirators at safety equipment industrial supply houses to commercial business. Especially look in stores catering to automotive and professional painters. Try the upscale Sherwin-Williams industrial outlets. Any paint store that sells 2-part Urethane paints. Also look in McMaster-Carr on line. You want the mask with the screw-on replacement cartridges with the proper fill, such as activated carbon etc. it wont make you invincable but will protect from casual inhalation.

BTW, I found very inexpensive white 2-part at Sherwin-Williams they sell for water tank lining and bilge water proofing. It did a really nice job below deck and chain locker. Pick the slow cure or you will be hustling.
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Old 03-02-2010
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I'd suggest also that you will never dry it effectively in place. The moisture has travelled along the plies of the plywood far and wide and probably took ages to move throughout the wood. This is one of several reasons that plywood is such a bad core. It will continue to rot and freeze/thaw cycles in the winter will eventually cause delamination. I suggest complete removal of the wet plywood and a recore with either end grain balsa or a foam core. It is a tough job from below. A neighbor just had 1/2 of his cabintop recored which included removing wet plywood and it took a pro about a month to complete the job (32' Westsail) from below.
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Old 03-02-2010
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Tommays, I looked at the picture of your "coffee" leak and it is very similar to mine (Cal 27, pop-top). The interior FG is thin in many spots, or poorly laid, so it doesn't seem worth wrecking a perfectly nice exterior when the interior is kind of crap anyway. The problem is the frost-heave with the wet wood.. when it expanded in the winter, it broke apart the seam where the cabin ceiling meets the pop-top frame, which is where it is slightly oozing coffee. It took me a while to figure out why it was oozing from the HIGHEST part of the boat, rather than a lower spot, and an area that isn't near any source of potential water intrusion.. it's oozing from that spot because it's the only area with an open seam to ooze from.
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Old 03-03-2010
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wet plywood core

As others have said you need to remove wet core. Attached is a picture of the plywood core in the cockpit sole of my boat. The boat was inside in a heated dry shop for two months before we cut the skin off and started removing the core. The plywood was totally delaminated and dripping water. Wow. Interestingly due to the heavy lay up there were no gelcoat or stress cracks on the sole. The pedestal would deflect the deck when leaned on but not that much. Fortunately my surveyor caught this and the buyer adjusted the price which covered the cost of the repair.

For those interested, the repair entailed a new plywood core with the center section being sold glass. This means that in the future the sole penetrations for the pedestal and rudder post will be through sold glass with chance for the plywood to get wet.
Attached Thumbnails
Wet plywood deck core - how to dry?-cocpitsole1.jpg   Wet plywood deck core - how to dry?-newsoleglass.jpg  
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Old 03-04-2010
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Saw an interesting thread on another board discussing the use of microwaves to dry core.

Using Microwaves to Dry a Wet Deck Core - Cruisers & Sailing Forums
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Old 03-04-2010
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One of the things you'll see posted on sailing forums is the old "drill a lot of holes and inject penetrating epoxy into it" trick. Let me tell ya, it don't work. All you end up with is sheets of rotten ply with lots of little epoxy towers in it. A PO tried this with Oh Joy's decks and I personally saw the results when I tore them off.
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Old 03-11-2010
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next steps in process

Here are some new pics of the plywood core adventure. One shows plywood and balsa cores laid in. The next shows the old skin placed on top as a template to drill new holes.
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Wet plywood deck core - how to dry?-sole-3.jpg   Wet plywood deck core - how to dry?-sole2.jpg  
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