Cost of replacing stays... - SailNet Community
 
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post #1 of 9 Old 03-01-2010 Thread Starter
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Cost of replacing stays...

My rigger tells me that some of my stays can't stay, so they have to go. He quoted replacement of 6 stays (4x mainmast lowers) and 2 whisker stays which are all 5/16 wire and will all have roller-swedged fittings on both ends. Project cost $1,000.

Having never replaced any rigging before, or gotten quotes before, is this within the realm of reason?

Also part of me wants to have norseman or equivilant fittings, at least on the bottom as many of my other stays have, but I can't actually figure why I really need the more expensive fittings. I already don't trust myself really to replace the stays myself, so why would I need the better fittings, besides the fact that they're, well better....

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post #2 of 9 Old 03-01-2010
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Maybe you don't need the more expensive fittings, maybe your rigger wants to make a better profit if he is the person selling them to you.
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post #3 of 9 Old 03-01-2010
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Medsailor—

One common reason that riggers, at least the better ones I've dealt with, recommend having mechanical fittings at the bottom, is because they tolerate the conditions the lower fittings are normally exposed to better—like salt spray, etc. The mechanical fittings are easier to inspect than swaged fittings. Having swaged fittings at both ends is better for the rigger.

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post #4 of 9 Old 03-01-2010 Thread Starter
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How bout the cost? Within the ballpark of reason?

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post #5 of 9 Old 03-01-2010
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A couple of years ago I replaced the standing rigging on the MC. I can not give you exact $s but the wire was about 300 to 400$. I had the top ends swaged for about 100$. That was six pieces. I bought new cones and reused my Norseman fitting on the lower ends. I had about 6 hrs rigging and a few hrs travel in the job. 5/16 wire, 41 ft mast. Dan S/V Marian Claire

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post #6 of 9 Old 03-01-2010
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The costs sounds right for having it done by the rigger, Though it's not a big job to have them made at less cost and DIY if you're ok with the trips up the mast. I've DIY replaced portions of my rigging on three different ocassions. I use swaged fittings with the expectation of keeping up with inspection. I would choose mechanical fittings for their durability and lifespan, but I wouldn't consider that the swage fittings are difficult to inspect. 'take care and joy, Aythya crew
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post #7 of 9 Old 03-01-2010
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How is the rigger doing the work? Are they going up the mast or do you have to take the mast down and is that going to cost extra?

If that is the total cost, it doesn't sound too high to do everything. I got new rigging for my 30' ketch this winter from rigging only and everything together was $1200 including shipping of the wires both way. It wasn't hard to send everything away at once since the masts are down.
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post #8 of 9 Old 03-01-2010
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The mast doesn't need to come down in this instance. The cost is in the mechanical fittings versus swage fittings.

Not all mechanicals: Norseman, Staloc, ARCO, Suncor, etc., can be "REUSED". They all depend on the initial installation. The biggest problem is in the first application and installation of a mechanical fitting regardless of the vendor!!

It is how the END USER put it together, whether it is reusable or not. That will not be seen until it is taken apart. This will determine how much is left of the threads, how much water/birdpoop/salt/oniondip/ actually corroded the threads, not to mention the galling (missthreading) that actually took place in the initial installation.
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post #9 of 9 Old 03-02-2010
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Galling isn't really "missthreading", but the seizing of the threads due to heat and thread mismatch during manufacture, called cold welding by Carpenter Technologies, the fastener industry's largest supplier of raw stainless steel raw material. It can be eliminated or greatly reduced by using lubrication and/or not going too fast, thereby reducing heat buildup.

Brian
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