Coated chainplates - SailNet Community

   Search Sailnet:

 forums  store  


Quick Menu
Forums           
Articles          
Galleries        
Boat Reviews  
Classifieds     
Search SailNet 
Boat Search (new)

Shop the
SailNet Store
Anchor Locker
Boatbuilding & Repair
Charts
Clothing
Electrical
Electronics
Engine
Hatches and Portlights
Interior And Galley
Maintenance
Marine Electronics
Navigation
Other Items
Plumbing and Pumps
Rigging
Safety
Sailing Hardware
Trailer & Watersports
Clearance Items

Advertise Here






Go Back   SailNet Community > On Board > Gear & Maintenance
 Not a Member? 
  #1  
Old 03-02-2010
elkscout's Avatar
Member
 
Join Date: Feb 2010
Location: Iraq (landlocked)
Posts: 93
Thanks: 0
Thanked 0 Times in 0 Posts
Rep Power: 5
elkscout is on a distinguished road
Coated chainplates

I've read about chainplates and associated hardware corroding from saltwater and how one type of stainless steel is more resistant than another, and they appear to be the foundation for a boat's rigging. Just like the foundation of a house, it's pertinent to have a strong "healthy" one.

So, are there such things as coated chainplates and hardware? It seems if they were at least powdercoated, then they would be more resistant to corrosion. Assuming they exist, I haven't seen much talk of them.

Last edited by elkscout; 03-02-2010 at 08:17 AM.
Reply With Quote Share with Facebook
  #2  
Old 03-02-2010
JohnRPollard's Avatar
Moderator
 
Join Date: Mar 2007
Location: Chesapeake
Posts: 5,680
Thanks: 0
Thanked 2 Times in 2 Posts
Rep Power: 10
JohnRPollard is a jewel in the rough JohnRPollard is a jewel in the rough JohnRPollard is a jewel in the rough
Quote:
Originally Posted by elkscout View Post
I've read about chainplates and associated hardware corroding from saltwater and how one type of stainless steel is more resistant than another, and they appear to be the foundation for a boat's rigging. Just like the foundation of a house, it's pertinent to have a strong "healthy" one.

So, are there such things as coated chainplates and hardware? It seems if they were at least powdercoated, then they would be more resistant to corrosion. Assuming they exist, I haven't seen much talk of them.
I'm not a metallurgist, but....

The vast majority of chainplates are made from stainless steel. There are different grades of stainless. Some are stronger, some are more resistant to corrosion. Some builders emphasize one attribute over another, which explains the different choices.

But all stainless needs to "breathe", or be exposed to oxygen. Otherwise it loses it's corrosion-resistant properties. So powdercoating stainless chainplates would be a big no-no, and would make things much worse.

As it is, properly sized and fitted stainless chainplates are reliable pieces of hardware offering great longevity, typically providing decades of service. You're more likely to run into issues with how they're bedded/attached.
__________________

To view links or images in signatures your post count must be 10 or greater. You currently have 0 posts.

Pacific Seacraft Crealock 31 #62

NEVER CALLS CRUISINGDAD BACK....CAN"T TAKE THE ACCENT
Reply With Quote Share with Facebook
  #3  
Old 03-02-2010
elkscout's Avatar
Member
 
Join Date: Feb 2010
Location: Iraq (landlocked)
Posts: 93
Thanks: 0
Thanked 0 Times in 0 Posts
Rep Power: 5
elkscout is on a distinguished road
Thanks for the reply John,
It seems with technology so advanced, there would be a substitute for stainless where it wouldn't have to breathe and could be coated to resist the corrosion/cracking, and hopefully last longer.
Most of the readings I've come across as made it sound like 15 to 20 years life expectancy out of the various kinds of stainless hardware, not decades.
Reply With Quote Share with Facebook
  #4  
Old 03-02-2010
CaptainForce's Avatar
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Jan 2006
Location: living aboard since 1972
Posts: 1,699
Thanks: 0
Thanked 12 Times in 12 Posts
Rep Power: 9
CaptainForce will become famous soon enough
Here's a stainless chainplate on a saltwater boat given no maintenance beyond washing and cleaning for 38 years.





Here's the same chainplate after a DIY removal, polishing & inspection.






Of course this is not as easy a task on an embedded chainplate, but it does support the idea of exposed stainless functioning well. 'take care and joy, Aythya crew

Last edited by CaptainForce; 03-02-2010 at 04:44 PM.
Reply With Quote Share with Facebook
  #5  
Old 03-02-2010
tager's Avatar
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Nov 2008
Posts: 991
Thanks: 0
Thanked 0 Times in 0 Posts
Rep Power: 6
tager is on a distinguished road
I am a fan of galvanized stuff. If I ever replace my chainplates, they will be galvanized or bronze. Either of these are very easy to inspect, and last just as long as stainless.
Reply With Quote Share with Facebook
  #6  
Old 03-02-2010
sailingdog's Avatar
Telstar 28
 
Join Date: Mar 2006
Location: New England
Posts: 43,291
Thanks: 0
Thanked 9 Times in 9 Posts
Rep Power: 13
sailingdog is just really nice sailingdog is just really nice sailingdog is just really nice sailingdog is just really nice sailingdog is just really nice
Good chainplates, made of 316L Stainless Steel, should be fine for a long time. One problem that is fairly common is when 304 Stainless was used, since it is far more prone to crevice corrosion issues. Another common cause of problems is when the chain plates are encapsulated in fiberglass and the sealant at the deck goes bad, allowing water into the fiberglass surrounding the chainplate. The water leads to crevice corrosion. 304 is also prone to chloride ion stress cracking.

Galvanized steel was used previously, but has issues. While galvanized steel will generally give warning prior to failure, which stainless steel often will not, it takes more work to keep it in good condition, and will often bleed rust on to the surrounding boat.

[QUOTE=elkscout;575837]I've read about chainplates and associated hardware corroding from saltwater and how one type of stainless steel is more resistant than another, and they appear to be the foundation for a boat's rigging. Just like the foundation of a house, it's pertinent to have a strong "healthy" one.

So, are there such things as
__________________
Sailingdog

To view links or images in signatures your post count must be 10 or greater. You currently have 0 posts.

Telstar 28
New England

You know what the first rule of sailing is? ...Love. You can learn all the math in the 'verse, but you take
a boat to the sea you don't love, she'll shake you off just as sure as the turning of the worlds. Love keeps
her going when she oughta fall down, tells you she's hurting 'fore she keens. Makes her a home.

—Cpt. Mal Reynolds, Serenity (edited)

If you're new to the Sailnet Forums... please read this
To view links or images in signatures your post count must be 10 or greater. You currently have 0 posts.
.

Still—DON'T READ THAT POST AGAIN.
Reply With Quote Share with Facebook
  #7  
Old 03-02-2010
elkscout's Avatar
Member
 
Join Date: Feb 2010
Location: Iraq (landlocked)
Posts: 93
Thanks: 0
Thanked 0 Times in 0 Posts
Rep Power: 5
elkscout is on a distinguished road
CaptainForce, you're pictures didn't come through, but I think you're suggesting some degree of PM to prevent a bigger repair job later. I guess I'm mostly thinking of what you're calling embedded chainplates or similar devices anchoring through the deck, and not so much as those fastened on the side of the hull.
Reply With Quote Share with Facebook
  #8  
Old 03-02-2010
CaptainForce's Avatar
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Jan 2006
Location: living aboard since 1972
Posts: 1,699
Thanks: 0
Thanked 12 Times in 12 Posts
Rep Power: 9
CaptainForce will become famous soon enough
Quote:
Originally Posted by elkscout View Post
CaptainForce, you're pictures didn't come through, but I think you're suggesting some degree of PM to prevent a bigger repair job later. I guess I'm mostly thinking of what you're calling embedded chainplates or similar devices anchoring through the deck, and not so much as those fastened on the side of the hull.
I restored the photos to the post and my intent is to show that good stainless steel can function for decades (38 years on this vessel) on a saltwater cruiser with minimal care. By "embedded" chainplates I was referring to those that are encapsulated in fiberglass, not just passing through the deck. I don't see alternatives to easily accessed stainless steel any where near as reliable. 'take care and joy, Aythya crew
Reply With Quote Share with Facebook
  #9  
Old 03-03-2010
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Sep 2009
Location: Kingston Washington
Posts: 505
Thanks: 0
Thanked 2 Times in 2 Posts
Rep Power: 5
Waltthesalt is on a distinguished road
I think coating is irrelavent to stainless steel applications. It's commonly used on commercial marine applications to reduce corrosion on mild steel components. 304 stainless can have chlioride stress corrosion at any stresspoint so all it would take is for the powder coat to have some cracking anywhere. I haven't heard about 304 stainless cracking in chainplates, it's more common in things like nicopress fittings. Chainpalates just don't see that kinda stress. The more common internal chain plate issue is that they're mils steel and they just rust away. If you're in a position to pick your chain plate material 316 stainless has better stress corrosion resistance than 304 ans will have adequate streinght as well. Make sure you do the calculations. Any stainelss needs to be thicker than the mild steel component to have comparable streinght.
Reply With Quote Share with Facebook
Reply


Currently Active Users Viewing This Thread: 1 (0 members and 1 guests)
 
Thread Tools

 
Posting Rules
You may post new threads
You may post replies
You may post attachments
You may edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is On


Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
Chainplates Newport 30 MBesant Gear & Maintenance 6 01-22-2009 03:09 PM
Replacing Chainplates FullandBy Gear & Maintenance 3 02-09-2007 04:13 PM
Pearson10M chainplates duke Gear & Maintenance 10 09-11-2006 10:04 PM
Rebedding Chainplates C&C 30 RobGallagher Gear & Maintenance 2 03-30-2003 08:48 AM
chainplates mary jewell Gear & Maintenance 1 10-25-2002 06:10 PM


All times are GMT -4. The time now is 08:44 AM.

Add to My Yahoo!         
Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.7
Copyright ©2000 - 2014, vBulletin Solutions, Inc.
SEO by vBSEO 3.6.1
(c) Marine.com LLC 2000-2012

The SailNet.com store is owned and operated by a company independent of the SailNet.com forum. You are now leaving the SailNet forum. Click OK to continue or Cancel to return to the SailNet forum.