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post #1 of 7 Old 03-02-2010 Thread Starter
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Deck Hand Rails

I have a C&C Redwing 30 that I've recently purchased. The deck hand rails have been removed at some point and were not with the boat when I bought it. The cabin handrails were also removed, however I do have them. I am guessing they were removed to avoid some wet leakage issues, since all the holes have been permanently sealed.

My questions:

- how difficult would it be to replace the deck handrails with none custom (store bought) teak rails? I expect the original rails were curved to follow the cabin roof line.

- do the deck rails screw into the cabin rails?

- if I rebed them, is leaking going to be an on-going issue?

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post #2 of 7 Old 03-02-2010
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All handrails are straight when purchased. You curve them as you install them, starting at one end and working to the other. By cabin rails do you mean the handrails inside the cabin? Through bolting with washers and nuts inside id best if you're going to depend on them. If your cabintop is cored make sure you pot the holes by overdrilling and filling with thickened epoxy before redrilling the proper size holes for the fasteners. This link will help. Sealing Deck Penetrations to Prevent Core Rot Photo Gallery by Compass Marine at pbase.com
If you do it this way there should not be a problem with leaking.

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post #3 of 7 Old 03-03-2010
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I recommend installing deck handrails straight instead of trying to bend them while installing them. On my boat a prior owner bent sail track during installation to match the deckhouse curve. The problem was that the track always remembered that it wanted to be straight. Over time this stress on the fastener holes in the deck caused water to leak into the core. Replacing water saturated core is one of the ugliest boat projects that you can imagine. So either put the handails in straight or get stainless steel ones made that are pre-bent to match the curve you want.
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post #4 of 7 Old 03-03-2010
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Because of cabin shapes straight might not work in all cases. I agree stainless is a stronger zero maintenance way to go. But there should never be a leak into the core with a proper installation. If the holes are potted as shown in the link I posted there should be no problems in the future with leaks, whether wood or stainless is used.

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Last edited by mitiempo; 03-03-2010 at 12:57 AM. Reason: add
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post #5 of 7 Old 07-11-2010
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Sama Sama

Quote:
Originally Posted by mitiempo View Post
Because of cabin shapes straight might not work in all cases. I agree stainless is a stronger zero maintenance way to go. But there should never be a leak into the core with a proper installation. If the holes are potted as shown in the link I posted there should be no problems in the future with leaks, whether wood or stainless is used.
I am having to replace hand rails on my 29' Bristol and wanted to know if there is any reason why I can't just seal the new ones made by Seateak with polyurethane?
Any help would be greatly appreciated!
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post #6 of 7 Old 07-11-2010
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The sealant will not guarantee that it will never leak. If there is a core it should be overdrilled and filled with thickened epoxy before drilling the proper size hole for the fastener and then sealing with polyurethane or whatever sealant is chosen - don't use silicone. The link I posted explains the best way to do this. This way if (when) there is a leak the core will not get wet, which leads to soft decks, rot and eventually an expensive and time consumung recore. Also if you are through bolting anything on deck seal the top but do not seal the backing plate or washer and nut below. If there is a leak you want to know about it so it can be fixed. Sealant used inside will prevent you from knowing the lwak exists, possible forcing the water into the core.

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post #7 of 7 Old 07-11-2010
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BTW, any deck hardware that is THROUGH-BOLTED should probably be bedded with butyl tape, unless it is going to be exposed to fuel on a regular basis.

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